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INTERNATIONAL 




\ 2 -A/) 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




Paris, Saturday-Sunday, August 20-21, 1994 


No. 34,672 



Threatens to 
Shut Border 

With French Leaving, 
Officials Fear Repeat 
Of Desperate Exodus 

By Keith B. Richburg 


BUKAVU, Zaire — As thousands of ■ 
Hutu refugees continued to stream out of- 
Rwanda in advance of- the completion of 
France’s military withdrawal, Zaire threat- " 
ened Friday to shot its border to prevent a' 
repeat of the exodus that ovenvhdmed the 
frontier town of GomaJast month - 
- The office of the tTmted T^atioas High 
Commissioner for Refugees in Bukavu, 
which is across the border from southwest- 
ern Rwanda, said the authorities in Kin- 
shasa, the Zairian capita], had informed 
them of their intention to close the border 
“if the situation gets out of h&nrL” 

No deadfine was given, but one UN 
refugee official said the action w<mld prob- 
ably come Sunday, the daybefore French 
intervention troops leave their humamtar- 
ian protection zone in. the region. • 

[In Kinshasa,. Depnty Prime Minister 
Mahimba Mbangtda said in a telephone 
interview with Agence France-Prcsse that 
he had given instructions for the border to 
be dosed aioundBukavu. 

“The bonder is dosed in the direction 
from Rwanda to Zaire but remains open in 
the other direction,. to allow refugees to 
return to their country,” he said.] . 

“They’re going to close the border defi- 
nitely by noon Sunday,” said Jerry van 
Mourik, the UN refugee representative in . 
the Rwandan town of Cyangugu, across 
(be congested narrow bridge from Bukavu. 

“If they close the border, people are 
going to be desperately trying to cross in 
another way.” he said, predicting that 
many refugees might tty to swim across the 
Ruzxri River to Zaire. He- stud about 100 
Zairian troops had already been seen mov- 
ing toward the border. 

News of the posable border dosing and 
reports that the new Rwandan government 
might be preparing^ send: troops into the 
“safe zone” seemed, to have prompted the ■. 
largest sngtedayYexo<&sy« mtoBuka-V 

VU. 

UN officials said refugees were crossing 
atarateof about 30 per minute, for a total 
of 15,000 to 20,000 new arrivals.. There 
were already an estimated 350^000 Rwan- 
dan refugees in the Bukavu area. 

In addition to the refugees who had ■ 
already crossed,, relief officials estimated 
that tens of thousands more were on the 
move in Rwanda, heading west through 
the Nyncgwe Forest, which separates the 
interior town of Gtkougoro from Cyan- 
gugu, malting the treacherous 120-kzlome- 
ter (75-mile) walk over a winding hillside 
road through rain and cold. 

Rwanda’s Hutu say they fear retribution 
by the Tutsi-dominated Rwanda Patriotic 
Front, which won a renewed cavil war after 
three months of fighting and a series of 
orchestrated massacres that left up to half 
a million people, mostly Tutsi, dead. 

Alan Riding of The New York Times 
reported from Paris: 

.Asserting that it had fulfilled its duty, 
France again rejected appeals on Friday to 
prolong its military mission in Rwanda 
and confirmed drat aD its troops would 

See RWANDA, Page 5 



Mtefaad A/znnd/Thr AJwmtcd Press 

A newly arrived Cuban refugee bugging bis brother on Friday in Key West. They had not seen each other in 11 years. 

Plutonium: World Peril or Cornucopia? 

U.S. and Russia Differ Sharply on What to Do With Material 


By Matthew L. Wald 
and Michael R. Gordon 

. New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — To Americans, it is an albatross, an economic 
liability and a threat to global security that must be rendered 
untouchable or be destroyed. 

But to Russians it is, as one official put it, “a national 
treasure,” to be husbanded now in order to produce boundless 
catargy for future gineratiOins^ - . ■ - - 

The object of these clashing views is prime weapons- grade 
plutonium, produced during the Cold War by each side at 
enormous cost in money, health and environmental damage. 

With the arms race winding down, huge stocks of plutonium 
are coming out of weapons — over the next decade at least 50 
tons each in the United States and Russia, American officials 

say- . . 

In Russia, this comes on top of plutomtun stocks accumulated 
for use in power plants. 

But now, as the United States searches for a safe way to get rid 
of plutonium, Russia wants not only to save the material being 


taken from weapons but also to make still more in the quest for 
energy. 

The country is planning a new generation of nuclear power 
plants called breeders that create more plutonium than the 
nuclear fuel they consume. And that plutonium, while not as 
pure as that from weapons, would sull be readily usable by 
weapons makers. 

What is more, senior Russian officials say they plan to pay for 
these costly plant-*. with dollars from the U.S. government, 
money that the Ministry of Atomic Energy here will cam from a 
contract to sell America still another weapons fueL highly 
enriched uranium. 

The United States has contracted to buy Russian plutonium to 
use it in civilian reactors Tor energy, but the real American 
purpose was to reduce the chances of theft or sales on the world 
market, a goal that could be undercut by the Russians’ use of the 
revenues to build breeder reactors. 

Thus, while the Cold War may be over, the gap in attitudes 
about its nuclear legacy could hardly be larger. And the Rus- 

See TREASURE, Page 5 


Nuclear Thefts Do Happen, Russian Says 


Compiled by Our Stuff Frvm Dupouhts 

ST. PETERSBURG, Russia — An official of the Russian 
nndear watchdog agracy, acknowledging for the first time lax 
security at nuclear sites/ said Friday that theft of radioactive 
material was not unusual. . 

“ft is a fairly common occurrence,” Sergei Novikov, deputy 
head of the northwestern section of Gosatonmadzor, said by 
telephone. "We have discovered many cases of theft of radioac- 
tive materials since we came into existence.” 

of Atomic Energy, responsible for 
new checks carried out 


But the Russian Ministry of Atomic 1 
top-secret military nuclear facilities, said 


at the orders of President Boris N. Yeltsin showed that no 
weapons-grade nuclear material was missing. 

“We can say quite clearly ibat nothing is missing and nothing 
has been lost,” said a spokesman, Georgi Kaurov. 

“We have completed investigations at all places holding pluto- 
nium and uranium-235,” he added. "We really have nothing 
missing" 

Concern about the safety of Russian nuclear facilities flared 
after German officials seized four lots of radioactive material. 

See BOMB, Page 5 


Downsides Seen if Bosnia Arms Embargo Is Ended 


By John Pomfret . 

WcBtoigKM Pm Service 

BUGOJNO, Bosnia - H erz eg ovi na — 
Lifting the arms, embargo on Bosnia's 
Muslim-led government, a move threat- 
ened by President Bill Clinton to put pres- 
sure on Bosnian Serbs, could speQ tragedy, 
not triumph, for the Bosnian Army and the 
war-weary peopleit represents, in the view 
of some officers in the united Nations and 
Bosnian forces. 

Exempting the Muslim side from the 
embargo imposed on Yugoslavia and us 
former republics three years ago would be 
intended to give its forces an edge m what 
many expect to be continued conflict un- 
less the Bosnian Serbs succumb to interna- 



tional pressure and sign the peace plan 
devised by the United States, Russia and 
European allies. 

Mr. 
: embar- 
go on Bosnia if the Serbs fail to accept the 
plan by the end of October. 

France and Britain, which constitute the 
backbone of the UN humanitarian mission 
in Bosnia, have warned that they will pull 
out their troops if the embargo is lifted. 
TbeJUN secretary-general, Sutras Butros- 
Ghali. has declared that if those two na- 
tions puB out. the entire 36,000-strong 
force in Bosnia and Croatia would have to 
be withdrawn. 

Despite recent gains, the Bosnian Army 


is unprepared to use the heavy weapons it 
wants and remains too weak to defend the 
hundreds of thousands of Muslim civilians 
along with significant chunks of territory 
currently protected by UN forces ana 
NATO warplanes, the UN and Bosnian 
officers say. 

The trouble for Sarajevo would begin, 
these officers predict, with Serbian troops 
punching north from the mountains above 
Mostar to sever the Muslims' main supply 
route up the Neretva Valley, which links 
central Bosnia to pons on the Adriatic. 

They envisage the Serbs then profiting 
from what appears to be the likely with- 
drawal of UN forces by squeezing 'Saraje- 
vo, the Bosnian capital, and rolling 


through three lightly defended Muslim en- 
claves in eastern Bosnia — Zepa, Srebren- 
ica and Gorazde. 

NATO warplanes, assigned to protect 
those enclaves, would be ineffective, argue 
these officers — who include the UN com- 
mander in Bosnia. Lieutenant General Mi- 
chael Rose of Britain — because no UN 
tactical air controllers would be present to 
call in aircraft against Serb forces when the 
possibility of bombing civilians is high. 

Jay Carter, a former lieutenant colonel 
in the U.S. Army who drew up war games 
for the Pentagon and was a planner during 
the Gulf War. estimated that it would take 

See BOSNIA, Page 5 


U.S., in Policy Shift, 
Will Turn Back 
Refugees From Cuba 

Alarmed by Surge, Clinton Shuts 
Door That Was Open for 3 Decades 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — Alarmed by a surge 
in the number of Cuban refugees reaching 
Florida, President Bill Clinton said Friday 
that “illegal refugees from Cuba will not be 
allowed to enter the United States.” 

He said Cubans who reached the United 
States “will be apprehended and treated 
like others.” Each refugee’s case would be 
reviewed for eligibility to remain, he said. 

Mr. Clinton said those picked up at sea 
will be taken to the U.S. naval base at 
Guantanamo. Cuba. He said his adminis- 
tration was exploring other regional ha- 
vens for Cuban refugees. 

The move was a dramatic shift from a 
three-decade-old, open-door policy to- 
ward Cubans, who traditionally have been 
granted free entry into the United States 
after a brief interview by immigration au- 
thorities. 

But Mr. Clinton has been under heavy 
pressure from Florida politicians as the 
tide of refugees making their way from 
Cuba has reached its highest level since the 
Mari el boatlift of 1980. 

The president, speaking at a White 
House press conference, called the sudden 
surge in the refugee How “a cold-blooded 
attempt to maintain the Castro grip on 
Cuba.” 

Mr. Clinton remained firm in his sup- 
port of the U.S. economic embargo against 
Havana. 

Additional U.S. ships are to be sent to 
the waters between Cuba and Florida to 
help intercept refugees making the treach- 
erous 90-mile (145-kilometer) trip in 
makeshift vessels, he said. 

Mr. Clinton said he had spoken to De- 
fense Secretary William J. Perry on Friday 
about shifting naval vessels from other 
duties to help patrol the Florida Straits. 

A Pentagon official said earlier that 
Coast Guard and navy ships would be 
pulled from dreg interoiction and Haiti 
embargo duty to deal with the Cuban refu- 
gees, or moved from ports on the U.S. 
coastline. 

The president said he was determined to 
avoid a repetition of the I9SG boatlift, in 
which 125,000 Cubans reached the United 
States over five months. 

“I'm not going to let it happen again,” 
he said. 

He said the government will detain Cu- 
bans who make it to the United States and 


“we will review all their cases.” He insisted 
the government was within the law in do- 
ing so. 

Under the 1966 Cuban Adjustment Act, 
Cubans who reach U.S. shores are effec- 
tively granted immediate political asylum. 
By custom, although it is not spelled out in 
the law, automatic asylum was extended to 
Cubans rescued at sea. 

Under the new policy, officials said, 
Cubans taken to GuantAnamo might have 
to apply for asylum under normal proce- 
dures. That means they would have to 
show a well-founded fear of persecution by 
Cuba's government. 

The refugees might also be able to apply 
for routine immigration, by virtue of fam- 
ily ties or other criteria. The precise proce- 
dures were not yet clear. 

There already are more than 14,000 ref- 
ugees from Haiti at Guantanamo, living in 
tents. 

Governor Lawton Chiles of Florida had 
been demanding that the administration 
change procedures under which “with a 
15-minute processing, these people were 
being sent to Miami, where they were be- 
ing released.” 

Interviewed Friday on NBC and ABC, 
he said that the move sent a firm signal 
from the U.S. government that could slow 
the exodus from Cuba. Cubans should be 
encouraged to stay home and “bring about 
the fall of Castro rather than escape.” he 
said. 

Dee Dee Myers, the White House 
spokeswoman, said ihe new policy was 
intended “to demagnetize the United 
States.” After the administration declared 
that Haitians would not be allowed to 
remain in the United States if they entered 
illegally, the flow of refugees from that 
Caribbean island slowed dramatically. 

The Coast Guard has picked up more 
than 2.700 Cuban refugees this month. 

Many Cubans in South Florida were 
first stunned, then outraged, by the an- 
nouncement 

“What this is is an insult to the Cuban 
people and nothing more,” said Julia Bar- 
rera, one of several exiles in Miami's Little 
Havana neighborhood who expressed an- 
ger over the plan. 

Cubans in Miami said the detention 
policy was foolish because the refugees 
would have to be released eventually. 


■'In- 


coming Monday: News of Liberation 


When Paris was liberated from its 
Nazi occupiers in 1944, the immediate 
effect was an immense outpouring of joy. 
Longer term, liberation has served as a 
powerful symbol always at the forefront of 
French political life. 


The 50th anniversary of the liberation, 
which will be celebrated Thursday, will be 
the subject of several articles in next 
week's issues of the Herald Tribune — 
including, on Monday, recollections by 
witnesses to that extraordinary period. 



Thf Pres* 


American soldiers marching down the C3uunps-Efys6es in August 1944. 


Kiosk 


Somali Gunmen Surround UN Office 


MOGADISHU, Somalia (Reuters) 
-A dozen UN foreign staff members 

era being held as virtual hostages Fri- 

ay by Somali Fii nmen who surrou nd e d 
icir house in Mogadishu, a UN 
»kesaan said 


Major Richard McDonald said that 
about 60 gunmen surrounded the 
World Food Program building on 
Thursday because of a money dispute. 
“People's lives are not under immediate 
threat,” he said. 


Advising Saudi King, New Council Walks a Tightrope 


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By Nora Boustany 

Washington Past Service 

RIYADH — In a joke making the rounds, the speaker 
of Saudi Arabia's wVmcmber Consultative Council is 
offered the gift of a parrot ,w*ite traveling abroad. 
“Thanks.” he replies. “I have 6uof them." 

“You may laugh,” one of the recently appointed mem- 
bers said when confronted with the jest. “It is not always 
yes, yes, yes. Sometimes we say no." 

Just when the 60 wise men say no is a secret, along with 
almost everything else about the council, the Majlis al 
Shura. In an absolute monarchy with no tradition of 
democracy, the new body giving some of King Fahd’s 
subjects a limited voice in the affairs of the kingdom 
remains a fragile experiment. 

The Saudi royal family has long argued that it has its 
own form of democracy in the tradition of the rnajlis, or 
“sitting,” when subjects are allowed into palace recep- 
tion halls to press petitions on princes and, often, the 
long himself. But in response to changing times and in 
some measure to urgings from Western countries such as 


the United States, King Fahd last year named the formal 
consultative body to review royal decisions. 

The experiment had been promised for decades. King 
Fahd renewed the pledge in 1979, after 500 aimed men 
occupied the Grand Mosque in Mecca. Islam's holiest 
site, m a protest against Western-style social liberaliza- 
tion. Little was heard about the prqject again until after 
the 1991 Gulf War. 

After still more delays, attributed to difficulties in 
balancing demands of the Western-oriented elites and 
conservative religious leaders. King Fahd named a 
speaker last August and the remainder of the council by 
December. The council has met 14 times and has passed 
18 resolutions, according to a rare statement issued 
recently by the speaker. 

Of the dO members, at least 35 hold doctorates. None 
is a member of the royal family. They are mostly Ameri- 
can-educated, hard-nosed technocrats. 

They enjoy a magnificent new headquarters bui tread 
carefully, for this is a country where the tradition of 
consultation is often referred to but remains a vulnera- 
ble, undeveloped concept. 


“We are trying not to rock the boat,” one council 
member confided. “We don't want (the council] dis- 
solved” 

“We are studying Robert's Rules of Order and modi- 
fying the book for our purposes." another member said, 
adding, “You can change anything except the word of 
God.” 

Regardless of how far the council goes once its mem- 
bers have a taste of power, at present it UmiLs itself to 
petitioning the king with local grievances emanating 
from the provinces or from a discussion among Majlis 
members. 

“There is no freedom of expression when it comes to 
religion or attacking the higher policies of government.” 
said one member, Fahd Harithi. 

Members are trying hard to help son out the country's 
administrative problems. They review projects referred 
to them by the government, such as the country's sixth 
five-year economic development plan. 

“The sixth plan will not be approved unless we review 

Sec SAUDIS, Page 5 



Page 2 



France’s Pesky Pasqua Grabs the Spotlight 


By Jonathan C. Randal 

Wiii&ifigifvi Pmt Sen nf 

PARIS — Turn on televi- 
sion. tune in radio, scan head* 
lines or glance at magazine 
covers: Even in France’s sac- 
rosanct vacation month, the 
larger-than-life figure of Inte- 
rior Minister Charles Pasqua 
enjoys star billing. 

Fresh from engineering the 
capture or the international 
terrorist known as Carios. Mr. 
Pasqua is at the zenith of his 
influence. France's “top cop" 
is described as such “an omni- 
present force" that political 
commentators mention him as 
a possible rightist successor to 
President Francis Mitterrand 
next year. 

Mr. Pasqua does nothing to 
discourage such speculation. 
With an admitted penchant 
for excessive remarks and acts, 
he has enjoyed a long career 
with other victories and plenty 
of controversy. 

His down-home, if some- 
times deliberately provoca- 
tive. style of political dis- 
course is reassuring to many 
French, ft is marked by a 
Gaullisl sense of nationalism 
and appeals to strong leader- 
ship and law and order, re- 
minding critics of what is 
known as the Bonapartist — 
or dictatorial — streak in 
French politics. 

Mr. Pasqua 's style strikes a 
deep chord with many French 
people otherwise troubled by 
the populist rhetoric of the 
righust extremist, Jean-Marie 
Le Pen, and the leftist crowd- 
pleaser. Bernard Tapie. 

Even before nabbing Car- 
los. Mr. Pasqua, 67, enjoyed 
substantial public approval 
for widespread identity checks 
of immigrants. 

Although he recently said 
he was “closing no doors." his 
chances of obtaining the presi- 
dency are considered slim. 



IVm <\pnn- Tranix-Pre-c 

Interior Minister Charles Pasqua was flanked by Mayor Jacques Chirac, left, and President Francois Mitterrand at 
ceremonies on Friday in Paris marking the start of celebrations of the 50th anniversary of the city's liberation. 


even if the front-running 
prime minister. Edouard Bal- 
ladur. and the perennial 
Gaullisl candidate. Jacques 
Chirac, knock each other out 
nexi year. But he certainly has 
enhanced his reputation as a 
kingmaker. 

His First term as interior 
minister between 1986 and 
1988 was marked by contro- 
versies. He chartered a jetliner 
to summarily deport 101 Mali- 
ans without due process. He 
provided a passport to a pros- 
ecution witness, allowing him 
to flee abroad and avoid testi- 
fying at the trial of a former 
Socialist minister accused of 
corruption. And his muscular 
approach to security was 


blamed for the death of a 
Franco- Algerian student in a 
Paris demonstration. 

Since resuming office in 
1993. Mr. Pasqua has raised 
eyebrows by sending home 
two Iranians wanted in Swit- 
zerland on terrorist charges, 
by granting a visa on medical 
grounds to an Iraqi cabinet 
minister. Tariq Aziz, and by 
consulting with his Saudi 
counterpart in the disputed 
Western Sahara. 

From his power base in the 
Hauls-de-Seine, France's 
wealthiest department. Mr. 
Pasqua has the money and in- 
fluence to indulge his contro- 
versial taste for intrigue in the 
Arab world and French- 
speaking Africa. 


He cultivates Third World 
sources — often said to fi- 
nance much of French politi- 
cal life — which in the past 
were part of a jealously guard- 
ed presidential domain. 

His practices have caused 
turf battles, notably with For- 
eign Minister Alain Juppfe. 

Mr. Pasqua recently took 
the United States, Britain and 
Germany to task for refusing 
to back the beleaguered Alge- 
rian government in its struggle 
with Islamic fundamentalists. 
His criticism of France's allies 
for maintaining relations with 
Algeria's Islamic Salvation 
Front was undercut when it 
came to light that he too was 
in touch with its representa- 
tives abroad. 


Moreover, domestic and 
foreign critics worry that his 
tactics may end up worsening 
France's relations with a fu- 
ture fundamentalist govern- 
ment as well as poisoning the 
lot of France's 3 million Mus- 
lims. 

“1 think Pasqua is taking a 
lot of risks for Iris petty per- 
sonal ends." said Jean Gla- 
vany. spokesman for the op- 
position Socialists. 

Despite partisan barbs, Mr. 
Pasqua is the season's super- 
star. The newspaper France- 
Soir said this was “Pasqua’s 
summer." adding that “every 
day adds something to the the- 
ory that he is not interior min- 
ister. but deputy prime minis- 
ter.- 


East Timor Guerrillas Say They’ll Deal, if Jakarta Is Ready 


Reiuen 

LISBON — Guerrillas fighting for the indepen- 
dence of East Timor said Friday that they would 
declare a unilateral cease-fire if the Indonesian gov- 
ernment was prepared to start serious talks with them. 

Jose Ramos Horta. the Australia-based overseas 
representative of the armed resistance movement in 
East Timor, said he had been specifically authorized to 
make the offer by a guerrilla leader, Konis Santana. 

Mr. Ramos Horta made the cease-fire proposal in 
an interview with Portugal's TSF radio following a 
series of moves by the Roman Catholic church and the 
Indonesian armed forces suggesting the start of a 
dialogue on the former Portuguese colony. 


“The moment that Indonesia shows it is seriously 
ready for dialogue the resistance will declare a cease- 
fire. 4 Mr. Ramos Horta said. 

The band of several hundred poorly armed and 
equipped pro-independence guerrillas in East Timor 
do not present a military threat to Indonesia's occupa- 
tion. but they command wide sympathy among the 
local population. 

Last week. Carlos Ximenes Belo, the Roman Catho- 
lic bishop of East Timor, said in an open letter that 
Indonesia, which invaded East Timor in 1975. should 
hold a referendum to decide its future. 

Failing that, he proposed talks between the Indone- 
sian government and “the political parties which once 


Ward 29, an Example of Africa’s Agony 


By Susan Okie 

Washmfiun Past Sennet v 

NAIROBI — On a ajg&ar 
day in Ward 29, on the etgnth 
floor of the huge Kenyatia Na- 
tional Hospital, the beds ’.look 
like playing cards laid ourin a 
grim game of solitaire: a face at 
the top. a face at the bottom. 
Each bed holds two patients, 
covered by a single sheet, lying 
quietly with legs held straight in 
an effort not to jostle their bed 
partners. 

Every eighth day. Ward 29 
receives all new adult medical 
patients admitted to the hospi- 
tal from Kenyatta's teeming 
emergency room. On those 
days, even with two patients to 
a baL Ward 29 soon runs out of 
mattress space. Then the new 
arrivals, often weak from pneu- 
monia, diarrhea or tuberculosis, 
must stretch out on the noor. 

With 1.860 beds. Kenyatia is 
sub-Saharan Africa's largest 
hospital, but no hospital is big 
enough to withstand the rising 
tide of illness caused by the 
continent's AIDS epidemic. 


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Doctors here say that AIDS 
cases have doubled in the last 
year and that the majority of 
patients in the hospital’s medi- 
cal wards suffer from AIDS- 
related infections. 

Kenyatta has 256 beds for 
adult medical patients. But de- 
spite the staff's desperate ef- 
forts to send patients home as 
soon as they can safely leave, 
the wards almost always con- 
tain at least twice that number, 
said Winifred Kihia, the nurse 
in charge of Ward 29. "There is 
no ward you can go to with an 
empty bed." she said. 

The pattern at Kenyatta is 
seen at hospitals all over sub- 
Saharan Africa. Studies from 
several countries show that 
AIDS has become the most 
common cause of death among 
adults in the region. In more 
than a dozen African cities. 20 
percent to 30 percent or the 
adult population is infected 
with the virus that causes 
AIDS. In many hospitals, the 
proportion has reached 50 per- 
cent or more. 

Of about 15 million people 
infected with the human Immu- 
nodeficiency virus, or HIV, 
since the global epidemic be- 
gan, more than 10 million are 
African, according to the World 
Health Organization. Of the 3 
million who have died from 
AIDS. 2 million were African. 

Kenneth Kaunda, the former 
president of Zambia, has lost a 
son. The University of Nairobi 
has lost a dozen professors. 
More than a million African 


children have lost their parents. 
In parts of Tanzania and Ugan- 
da. villages have opened day- 
care centers to feed AIDS or- 
phans and to give overburdened 
relatives a rest. 

In one Zambian town last 
year, an American doctor. 
Anne C. Moore, visited a grave- 
yard that had burst its bounds, 
spreading into the surrounding 
fields, and was unable to find a 
single grave that was more than 
two years old. 

In areas of the continent 
where the epidemic has struck 
hardest, going to funerals fills 
many people's leisure time. 
“We are having funerals in our 
clan every went — brothers, 
cousins," said a doctor in Kisu- 
mu. a city in western Kenya. 
“We are very scared for our 
children, even for ourselves. It's 
our generation that is dying." 

Even before AIDS appeared. 
Africa was the continent with 
the lowest life expectancy, the 
highest child mortality and the 
heaviest burden of disease. Sub- 
Saharan Africa was particularly 
susceptible to an AI DS epidem- 
ic because of widespread vene- 
real disease, which facilitates 
the spread of HIV infection, 
and inadequate medical care 
which, for example, caused 
AIDS-tainted blood to be used 
frequently in transfusions. 

Awareness of AIDS is almost 
universal, according to studies 
from many African countries. 
Condom sales in sub-Saharan 
Africa increased from less than 
2 million in 1986 to more than 


70 million in 1993. according to 
the World Health Organization. 
A survey of pregnant women in 
Nairobi found that AIDS was 
their top health concern. 

“About half of the women 
that we study think (hat they 
are personally at risk." said 
Frank Plummer of the Univer- 
sity of Manitoba, whose team 
conducted the study. “Their 
own behavior would be consid- 
ered low-risk. Bui they’re terri- 
fied because of their husbands.” 

But experts say there is no 
evidence that awareness and 
fear of AIDS have spurred 
widespread changes in sexual 
behavior, or that the progress of 
Lhe deadly epidemic has slowed. 

AIDS nsearcheis point to 
hopeful signs: dramatic in- 
creases in condom use among 
truck drivers and prostitutes 
who participated in intensive 
AIDS-prevention programs: 
booming condom sales in Afri- 
can countries with “social mar- 
keting" programs, and an ap- 
parent reduction in the rales of 
sexually transmitted diseases in 
cities such as Harare, Zimba- 
bwe. and Kampala. Uganda. 

Some African countries — 
including Uganda. Zambia. 
Ethiopia. Botswana and Sene- 
gal — earn high praise for their 
determined efforts to combat 
AIDS. But researchers say that, 
from the data available, no 
country has mustered a combi- 
nation of political commitment, 
grass-roots activism and inter- 
national resources sufficient to 
slow the spread of the virus. 


day. 


state radio said. 


Mr. Enahoro was the mem- 
ber of Parliament who first en- 
tered the motion seeking Nige- 
ria's independence in 1956. It 
was the beginning of the pro- 
cess that led to independence 
four years later. 

General Sani Abacha. Nige- 
ria's ruler, earlier dismissed 
leaders of the oQ unions and the 
Nigeria Labor Congress and 
appointed administrators to. 
run their affairs. (AP, Reuters) 


i » t 


CIAHel L 

The French 


Get Carlos, 
Spy Says 

The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — The 
Central Intelligence Agency 
tracked the terrorist “Carios the 
Jackal” for two decades and 
helped French authorities 
“dose the noose," an American 
intelligence official said Friday. 

Hie 44-year-old Venezuelan 
terrorist, whose real name is 
Ilich Ramirez SAnchez, was 
turned over to France on Mon- 
day by Sudan after more than 
20 years on the run. He was 
wanted in the 1975 Irittings Of 
two French counterintelligence 
officers, and has been dunged 
in a 1982 bombing in Paris. 

The UJS. official said the CIA 
had tracked Carlos across four 
continents. “CIA helped dose - 
the noose by steadily denying 
Carios safe havens,” the official 
said. 

In Paris, meanwhile, the law- 
yer defending Carios claimed in 
an interview that an adviser to 
President Francois Mitterrand 
wanted to have the attorney 
trilled in the early 1980s. 

The lawyer, Jacques Vergfes, 
was quoted in the daily France- 
Soir on Friday as saying that an 
attempt cm Ins life was not car- 
ried out “simply because it 
would have been too visible.” 

In 1982, Mr. Vagfes repre- 
sented Magdalena Kopp, a sus- 
pected West German terrorist 
now thought to be married to 
Carios. Mr. Vergis claimed that 
Franqois de Gxossouvrc, a Mit- 
terrand friend who committed 
suicide in April, told him that 
he was pot on a hit fist drawn up 

by a p residential anti-terrorism 
adviser. . ■ 

Those on the list were “reput- 
edly dangerous,” Mr. Verges 
said. At the time, he said, the 
president refused, “after think- 
ing it over a long rime." 


WORLD BRIEFS 



Antl^thercsptmsWlityfOT 

the Palestinian partof it” Mr. Poes said. Them«to& 
madmd the ffisfamiveisaiy of the secret Narwegia^Kfr^ 
Stein which the Isradfr-PJLO 

funding for the stmggfoig sd£rule movement as PLO 

tfforato control mihSnt Muslims opposed to the accord. 


Cries of 'Shame!’ as Poles Acquit 2 

WARSAW (AP) — A Warsaw court acquit ted tw o 
era secret police generals on Friday of involvement in the 1984 
.murder priest active in the ScdWraW refOTnmOTeoMiL 
Shouts of “Disgrace!" ‘[Shame!" “Scandal! and “Down with 
Communists!” rang but in the courtroom; • 

’ Ending; a two-year trial, the judge rate d then: 

evidence that the generals, Wladydaw Gaston and rmek. 

had been involved in the abduction and killin g of the Reverend 

^*SeS£S«fthe priest became a symbol to many ? f 
Communist repression against citizens mid the Roman Utw»c 
Church. His anti-Communist sermons drew tens of thousands of 
people after the Solidarity labor union was outlawed under 
martial law in December 1982. 

Germans Brace for Neo-Nazi Activity 

BONN “ " "" ' ‘ 

Germany - — 

Nazis to demonstrate this 
ltband Than, Rudolf Hess. 



existed in East Timor" on how to give effective auton- 
omy to the territory of 750.000 people. 

Major Simbolon. a military spokesman in the East 
Timor capital of Dili, reacted by saying “we are ready 
and willing to hold talks with anyone." 

“The United Nations must be involved in one way 
or another." Mr. Ramos Horta said, “so that Indone- 
sia does not transform this process into just a bilateral 
dialogue between the resistance and the Indonesian 
army." 

The United Nations does not recognize Indonesia's 
annexation <SF East Timor, but for two years it has 
hosted exploratory talks between Indonesia and Por- 
tugal to seek an internationally acceptable solution. 


Nigeria Seizes 
2 Leaders of 
Opposition 

Compiled hr Oar Si off From Dupmtha 

LAGOS — The military gov- 
ernment arrested two promi- 
nent opponents on Friday, in- 
cluding tbe politician who 
began Nigeria s bid for inde- 
pendence from Britain four de- 
cades ago. 

Police officers entered the 
Lagos Sheraton Hotel and ar- 
rested Anthony Enahoro and 
Cornelius Adebayo, both lead- 
ers of the National Democratic 
Coalition, the main opposition 
group. The coalition has been 
supporting the effort by Mo- 
shood K. O. Abiola, now on tri- 
al for treason, to assume Nige- 
ria's presidency. 

The military government, 
pursuing on offensive to crush a 
six- week-old strike by oil and 
other unions in support of Mr. 
Abiola, has called up retired oil 
workers and has told the strik- 
ers to get back to work by Mon- 
f, the s 


FreshPush 
For Peace 
biSriLanka 


Conpded hr Or Staff From Dl Ifpatehes 

COLOMBO — Chandrika 
Kumaratunga took office Fri- 
day as Sri Innka's first socialist 
prime minister in 17 years and 
immediately began the task of 
. rebuilding a nation divided by a 
guerrilla war. 

Mrs. Kumaratunga, 49. set 
up a Ministry of Ethnic Affairs 
to lead efforts for a settlement 
with Tamil rebels. 

"We have stretche d a ha nd of 
friendship to the LTTE," the 
Liberation Tigers of Tamil Ee- 
lam. she said here. 

“We hope they take it and 
come for discussions and re- 
enter the democratic process." 
she said. 

In London, a rebel spokes- 
man welcomed Ms. Kumara- 
tunga's ofTer for “uncondition- 
al" talks. In the rebels' first, 
public comment on tbe election, 
a spokesman. Anton Raya, said: 
“We are very happy that she is 
willing to talk to us. We are also 
willing." 

Her victory Tuesday ended 
17 years of rule by the United 
National Party, which created a 
booming free-markei economy 
but also was blamed for ram- 
pant corruption, human-rights 
abuses and the internal war. 

The Peoples' Alliance coali- 
tion has only a slim majority in 
Parliament, which could make 
it difficult for Mrs. Kumara- 
tunga to achieve peace as well 
as her other goals: to increase 
employment, attract more for- 
eign investment and change the 
structure of the government 

Policemen and soldiers dis- 
mantled roadblocks and lifted a 
round-the-clock curfew im- 
posed to prevent violence after 
the election. 

The new government of 22 
cabinet ministers includes her 
mother, former Prime Minister 
Sirimavo Bandaranaike, 72, 
who may run in a presidential 
election in November. She was 
named a minister without port- 
folio. (AP.AFP) 


arrests in Germany. . . . 

Interior Ministty officials in lhe eastern states of Thuringia and 
Brandenburg banned Hess cornirwemoirarions planned by neo- 
Nazis in Erfurt and PotsdataAU demonstrations were banned m 
the two states until. Sunday. 

7 Russians Killed on Afghan Border 

MOSCOW (Reuters) — Seven Russian border guards were 
killed 13- -woe wounded in Tajikistan when exile rebels 
launched an overnight attack from Afghanistan, a guards spokes- 
man, said Friday. • • - • . - ■ ■ 

It was the most serious loss .in more than a year for the Russian 
force, policing Tajik borders under an agreement with the ex- 
Communist government in Dushanbe. The Kremlin has protested 
to Afghanistan. 

The Interfax news agency quoted a deputy border guards 
commander, Nflcokri Bordyuzha, as saymg in Moscow that at least 
50 rebels had been killed m die attack. 

Three Held in Cambodia 'Still AW 

PHNOM PENH (AP) — Three Westerners held hostage by 
Khmer Rouge guerrillas are still aHve^ a senior Cambodian official 
said after visiting the pro v ince where they have been captives for 
more than three weeks. - 

Foreign Minister Norodom Smvudh gave the assurance after 
being briefed by mfiitary. officials, and. the governor erf the south- 
ern province erf Kampot, where the men were taken and detained. ^ 

MarkSatCT, 28, of Britain; David Wilson, 29, of Australia, and T 
a Frenchman, Jean-MacfadBra cpie t, 26, were seized July 26 when 
the guerrillas attacked * tram. “Tbey are sitill alive,” Mr.jSiriyudh 
said “They received eyEaytiing we scut to them. When the parents ■" 
send maiVtfaey receive it."- - 

Reprieve for Dutchman in Singapore 

. .SINGAPORE (AP) — A Dutch businessman facing execution 
for, drug smuggling gamed areprieve erf at leastoheweA Friday as 
his government made Jtofe-tihdi efforts to save his life. 

- • President Qng TengGbeong rejected a clemency plea this week 
by Johannes vanDamme, 58, who has been on death row since he 
was convicted in April 1993 of possessing 4 3 kilograms (10 
pounds) of heroin, hi 1975, Shmqmre^ made the death penalty 
mandatory for possession of 15 grams or more of heroin; 72 
people tove been hanged since. Some were foreigners, but Mr. van 
Damme would be the first Westerner to be hanged. 

It was thought that Mr, van Damme might go to the gallows on 
Friday, die day executions are carried but in Singapore. But the 
Prison Department said there were no hangings on Friday, giving 
Ok Dutch government another week to pursue efforts to save Mr. 
van Damme. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 
Parte-Rome Flights on British Airline 

British Airways is to begin a service between Paris and Rome, 
taking on Air France and Alitalia' and providing a foretaste of the 
competition that will become mcrcasingly common in deregulated 


Thc airiine said that beginning Oct. 23, certain flights from 
London's Gatwick Airport to Paris would fly on to Rome, 
rat French 


allowing it to 
saved just by the 
fligjhts in the 
passe n gers to 



— o — in a market formerly . 
earners of France and Italy. Similarly, on “ 
direction, BA will be able to carry Italian 
or on to London. (Bloomberg) 


Wildfires were homing oat of coatoot on the island of Crete f or a 
third day Friday, while other fires were reported in northwestern 
Greece and on the island of Corfu; The Forestry Service said it 
was battling difficult blazes in lhe region of Khatifa, in northern 
Crete, and near Lasithiin the eastern part of the island. (AP) 

Britata lost mrt to Spate on. Friday in what ft prides itself on 
doing best: making a cup erf tea. Iberia Airlines of Spain won the 
1994 In-Flight Best Cup of Tea Award, beating British Airways 
and British Midland. (Reuters) 

- Officials m Moscow reessmd Russians on Friday that cholera 
had not reread from the republic of 1 Dagestan and that there was 
no need for a quarantine • (Reuters) 

■ Striking ground iratfcera of P MUp piae Airlines stopped nickel- 
ing and returned to work Friday, m compliance with a 
Department order, union and management officials -said. 


abor 

(AP) 


Improve 

International 

Relations 


To call from country to country, or to the U.S., dial the WorldPhone® number of the country ybu're calling from. 


Antigua 

(Available from public 
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(Outside of Managua, cBal 02 first) 
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Panama 
Military I 


3V-' 




•V/CSMBW 


Um your MCI Card.* local telephone card or cafl eoHeet-aB at Ifw sama low rates- 
(CCl Country-io-country calling available. May not be avatUite Ktffoom aN intainStional locations. Cartain 
restrictions apply Limited availability. T Wait tor second dial tone. A AveBabte tram LADATEL public 
phones only. Rate depemte on can origin in Maaiea t (ntemattonM oommontea**** 1 ewri * f - * Nal ** aB " 
attic from pubfic pay phones. ♦ Public phonos may require deposit of <n*n x P*»ra fer <fio * ***• 


188 
800-19912 
108 

2810-108 
008-11600 

Pare (Outskted Lima, die) ISO firaU 001*190 

PofamdKX) 0V61-O4600-222 

PortugaftCCJ OS-017-1234 

Puerto RtootCO 1 60068860M 

Owarieci* 0800612-77 

RomtnlatCOf 01-800-1800 

Rosstatt}* &Vl 0-800*497-7222 

Sa^MarinotOD* . ' 172-1022 

Sam&AnaNt • 1600-11 

Slovak KapufaOctCQ 00-42600112 

South AMcatCO. . * 0800696011 

MmmoNTLei 

From MCt 


900686014 

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0800 

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SpaintOQ. 

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Turkey* 

Ufa»in*+ 

-Unfted Arab Emirates 
UidMd JCngdomra . 

To call the ILS. using BT 0800-83-02227 

To cafi the UJ5. using MERCURY . 0S00696222* 
To call anywhere other than Oib US, 0500-809-800 
(Collect iwtMflabfej 000412 

ITS. Virgin lalandstco '.-800-888-8000 

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Venezuelan BOO-11146 


It Take You Around The World 




« 




Page 3 






INTERNATIONAL'^HERAtl) TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 20 - 21, 1994 





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By Glenn Rjfldn 

Nets' VwA Times' Service •' ' 

NEW -YORK t— The .rouj^picnVpf 
IBM has urged the company’s ' \ 10,1)00 
employees in the United States to fight Tor 
dereai of.two Democratic health-care hills 
m Congress. f " ' = " ‘ 

The memo, believed to be the first of its 
Kind for a- company with- a tradition of 
keeping politics put of its cpmmunicadons 
with^employ«s. was -sent Monday over. 
IBM's intern al electronic mail networks it . 
came from the company's vice chairman,-. 
Paul J. Rizzo. with the approval of -th& 
chairman, Louis V. Gerstner Jr, - 

The memo urged all employees of -Inter- ■ 
national Business Machines Corp. to con- 
tact their senators and reprewairatives and ' 
suggest the defeat of- bills proposed by 
Senator George J.Miichell, Democrat of 


; ; Mhrot -and Representative Richard A 
. Gephardt. .Democrat of Missouri. 

„ v Kzzo counseled employees to send 
■ a message he had written. The message 
r . read in pan, referring to medical benefits: 
&.rfi2$J&A^ldicM'and Gephardt bills pose a 
“ serious threat to my company’s ability to 

manage and control the cost and quality of 
; •. these benefits.” 

\ j Campaigning on health care legislation 
' w'-spririgmg up at companies across the 
-• nation, whether through paper memos or 
^ electronic mail, said Frank Coleman, a 
ri&>pi*sJdem : ai the U.S. Chamber of 
vCemoeree in- Washington, 

At IBM, where political discourse has 
tradhi on ally been taboo on the company’s 
-‘.“VaiSt electronic network. Mi. Rizzo's mes- 


Ig Blue c i¥o ? 


proposed by sage touched orf a debate. 
Democrat of Thtiugli many simply thanked Mr. 


for keeping them informed, there was 
some sentiment against such politicking on 
the network. v 

Scott Brooks, an IBM spokesman, said 
that by Wednesday, Mr; Rizzo’s office had 
received more than 4.000 "electronic re- 
sponses. Mr. Brooks said that a huge ma- 
jority of the responses were simply seeking 
more information and -most applauded the 
company's stance, but that a minority of 
employees were unhappy about the breach 
of IBM etiquette. 

. . “I share your concern over the various 
pending forms of health-care legislation 
and 1 was quite happy to see IBM take the 
position it did in the recent statement you 
referenced,” wrote one employee in an 
electronic message read to a reporter by 
Mr. Brooks. “Nonetheless. I feel your rct- 


j 

.tt23 






erenced call for employee action is wrong 
and inconsistent with IBM's principles.” 






Senators 


Make Deal 
On Health 


Nevertheless, the announce- 
ment on Thursday quickly 
buoyed the hopes of many 
Democratic supporters of 
health-care legislation. 

But major loose ends re- 


mained: The group had not set- 
tled on just what level of subsi- 
dies for the poor it. wanted to 


provide, and what taxes to pay 
for them it would recommend. 


for them it would recommend. 

Robert D„ Rrischauer, the 
head of the Congressional Bud- 
get Office, had warned the sea- 
alors that their ideas might fail 
$300 bfltioa short of btuandng 
over several yean. 

Senator George J. Mitchell of 
Maine; the Democratic leader, 
has made it dear that he will be 
receptive to many of the group’s 
ideas, but the RrouHican lead- 
cr.BObDoleoflUnsajC’scofts 

On the floor, meanwhile, the 
Senate agreed on three uncon- 
rroversial .and mostly technical 
amendments, 


Democrats 
See Crime 
Bill Gain 


By Kenneth J. Copper 
and Ann Devroy 

Washiapan Pan Semce 

WASHINGTON — Demo- 
cratic leaders in Gongress say 
they have made “great pro- 
gress” toward assembling ma- 
jority support for a compromise 
crime bill, which they predict 
the House win approve within 
days. 

That prediction came from 
Senate majority leader. George 
J. Mitchell of Maine, and the 
House speaker. Thomas S. Fo- . 
ley of Washington, after they 
and other Democratic leaders 
met with President Bill Ctinion. 

. To push the election-year leg- 
islation through the House, 
over the opposition of most Re- 
publicans and anti-gun control 
Democrats, officials said they 
had won over five Democrats 
and readied an agreement to 
trim $1 billion from the $30 
billion MIL which retains sup- 
port from 1 1 Republicans. 

“Crime is the No. 1 issue,” 
Representative Henry Hyde. 
Republican of Illinois, said Fri- 
day. “But that doesn't mean 
you lay down and play-dead,” 

Democrats were working on 


significantly higher trims — up 
to $3.5 billion — to. win more 


Republican support, having 
concluded they could hot get 
more Democratic votes. 

Mr. Mitchell was unequivo- 
cal in predicting that the legisla- 
tion would pass. The Mil was 
blocked last week when a key 
procedural rule was defeated, 
225 to 210. 

“We believe it will be enacted 
in the next few days.” Mr. 
Mitchell said. 

Asked if be especied a politi- 
cal battle in the Senate. Mr. 
Mitchell said the Senate would 
, “stay with, it” until it passes 
crime legislation. 

Besides the cuts m preven- 


tion programs* modest changes 
in the bill would strengthen a 


provision allowing local au- 
thorities to notify 
when a violent sexual offenders 
is released into a community* 
The official said a compro- 
mise on assault weapons could 
pick up two Democrats almost 
The National Rifle Association 
“is digging in on.this. an atit- 
ciai said. 




BO 






POLITIC AL XOTES 


mm. 


~yir-N 


Bar HemovSng Starr 


By Adam Clymer 

Ne%- Yari Times Sennr • 

WASHINGTON — After a 
deal nearly came apart, a bipar- 
tisan group of senators' has 
reached an agreement on a pro- 
posed compromise on national 
health insurance legislation. 

The plan, details of which 
were yet to be announced, is" 
expected to put much more em- 
phasis on deficit reduction than 
the proposals of President BUI 
Clinton, and Democratic con- 
gressional leaders. At the same 
time; it is likely to fall well short 
of the universal coverage Mr. 
Clinton has said he would insist 


WASHINGTON — Turning aside mount- 
ing Democratic criticism of the naming of 
. Kenneth .W. Starr as new Whitewater inde- 
pendent counsel, a judicial panel led by Judge 
David B.-' Sen telle. of the U.S. Court of Ap- 
peals said it had no power to remove the 
independentxbimsds it appoints. 

- The three-judge panel rejected a request 
from Senator Carl M. Levin, a Michigan 
Democrat, who asked the judges to get a full 
accounting from Mr. Starr of his political 
activities,- and- decide whether they comport, 
with the appearance of impartiality required 
of an independent counsel. 

In dexiyingMr, Levin's request. Judge Sen- 
telle said the law does not require Mr. Starr 
to disclose bis political activities. The judges 
have “no current power of supervision or 
termination” over Mr. Starr, he wrote, and 
they are not authorized to offer “advisory 
opinions” about the appearance of impartial- 
ity. - 

. Under the law, an independent counsel can 
be removed through impeachment by Con- 
gress or by the attorney general for “good 
cause” or impairment 

Mr. Starr was solicitor general during the 
Bush administration and has been an active 
supporter of conservative Republican politi- 
cians. Democratic opposition to Mr. Starr 
has continued to grow, with 39 members of 
the House signing a letter calling on the 
judges either to urge Mr. Starr to withdraw 
or explain how he can meet the legal standard 
■ofappearmg to be impartial . {WP) 


he is in office. To allow the sexual harassment 
suit to go forward, the department argued, 
could irreparably interfere with the presi- 
dent’s performance of his official duties. 

The 25-page legal argument from the de- 
partment was obtained from the lawyers for 
Paula Corbin Jones, the woman who brought 
the lawsuit on May 5. (NYT) 


1.V .. j^jiu ■ it <L«, , uii i d Pn>» 

Mexico Gty is strung with tens of thousands of political banners as its residents prepare for elections on Sunday. 


NAACP Meets on Chief’s Fate 


WASHINGTON — Benjamin F. Chavis 
Jr..' the embattled executive director of the 
NAACP, was expected to Face a severe test 
over the weekend at an emergency session of 
the civil rights organization’s board in Balti- 
more called to pass judgment on his tenure. 

Mr. Chavis is at the center of a political 
storm caused by the disclosure last month 
that he had secretly committed up to 
$322,400 of the debt-ridden organization's 
funds to settle a sex discrimination complaint 
by a former employee. Mary E. StanseJ. Oth- 
er critics have said Mr. Chavis is leading the 
National Association for the Advancement 
of Colored People toward bankruptcy and 
threatening to destroy its historic rote as a 
mainstream champion of integration politics 
by courting the Nation oflslam leader Louis 
Farrakhan and other black extremists. 

Meanwhile, Mr. Chavis has apparently re- 
solved an allegation about his behavior with 
a second woman employee. His wife's former 
secretary. Susan Tisdale, 32, of Cleveland, is 
backing off claims of improper behavior she 
was preparing against him. NAACP sources 
said. I WP. AP ) 


Thumbprints and Guards at Ballot Boxes 


Justice Dept. Backs Immunity’ 


WASHINGTON — The Justice Depart- 
men rhas thrown its weight behind President 
BiB Clinton's claim that the sexual harass- 


ment suit he is frtdng from a former Arkansas 
dericaJ-worker should be put. off until he 
:, 1iaW6S ! e'fiTcer ' " 7; . 


Kweisi Mfume, chairman of the Congres- 
sional Black Caucus, on the difficulties of 
forging a crime bill that will pick up necessary 
support: “This thing is such a delicate balanc- 
ing act that, if you do one thing to get this 
. group _pf lawmakers;, you almost automati- 


on a brief filed with afederal court in Little 
Rock. Arkansas, the department argues that 
the president is immune from a civil suit while 


rally lose that group of lawmakers. Every- 
thing about this bill seems to he governed by 
the physical laws of equal and opposite reac- 
tions.” 


By Tim Golden 

.Vcir Yurk Tintn Sen-ice 

MEXICO CITY — To scrub the stain of 
illegitimacy from Mexican elections, the 
government has spent hundreds of mil- 
lions of dollars; on new voter-registration 
cards, brought in foreign experts to audit 
its voter rolls and developed an ink that 
voters will not be able to wash off their 
thumbs to vote again. 

When Mexicans choose their next presi- 
dent on Sunday, the slots in the ballot 
boxes will be narrow to hamper ballot 
stuffing. Governing party organizers will 
face jail sentences if they pay for votes, and 
tens of thousands of observers will be on 
guard around the country to make sure 
they do not uy. 

Yet. while the actual voting will almost 
certainly be the freest in Mexico's modem 
history, the government's failure to fully 
carry out other agreed-upon reforms has 
left doubts among Mexicans that the polit- 
ical competition leading up to the election 
has been entirely fair. 

Short on resources, a new special prose- 
cutor for electoral crimes has not prosecut- 
ed anyone yet. A half-dozen “citizen-mag- 
istrates" have taken control of the federal 
elections board in Mexico City, but only a 
tiny fraction of the agency’s officials have 
been replaced at its offices around the 
country. . 

And despite, constant allegations of gov- 
erning-party abuse, new limits on cam- 
paign spending and the use of government 
resources for political gain Have gone vir- 
tually unenforced. 


“People who are saying these are going 
to be truly democratic elections are con- 
futing the start or this process with the 
end ” said Sergio Aguayo, a political scien- 
tist who leads the most prominent group of 
observers. 

More than ever beTore. the governing 
Institutional Revolutionary Party would 
appear to have a genuine interest in keep- 
ing at least the balloting dean. Its presi- 
dential candidate. Emesto Zedillo Ponce 
de Le6ru is comfortably ahead in all of the 
more reputable opinion polls. 

Though he has wielded the overwhelm- 
ing powers of incumbency in the cam- 
paign. he has said he wants no undue help 
on election day. 

It remains unclear whether that message 
has Tillered down to candidates for Con- 
gress and other posts from the more tradi- 
tionalist and corrupt wings of the govem- 
ingparty. 

The immediate fear among officials is 
that doubts about the system and com- 
plaints of an unfair campaign could fuel 
violent protests if Mr. Zedillo wins amid 
even a hint of fraud. 

But even if the threat of unrest does not 
materialize, it ts almost a given in the 


The darkest shadow over the vote on 
Sunday, however, is entirely of the PRI's 
making. 

In the election six years ago. after early 
returns from urban areas showed the main 
opposition candidate. Cuauhtemoc Carde- 
nas Solorzano. ahead, electoral officials 
interrupted reporting, saying the vote- 
counting computers had broken down. 
When the results began to appear again 
days later, victory went to Carlos Salinas 
de’Gortari by a margin of 50.3 percent. 

In June. Arturo Nunez Jimenez, the di- 
rector of the Federal Electoral Institute, 
the agency in charge of organizing elec- 
tions. admitted publicly that his predeces- 
sors had “opted for the system to fail” in 
1988. 


Even so. the interior minister at the time. 
Manuel Bartlett Diaz, now the PRl gover- 
nor of Puebla State, has continued to argue 
that nothing untoward went on. It has not 
been possible to check the figures because 
copies or the polling station results were 
burned. 


governing party, known as the PRl, that 
the new president's strength will depend 


the new president's strength will depend 
greatly on the credibility or official results. 

“We are trying to have Swiss elections in 
a country that is not Switzerland.” said 
Humberto Lira Mora, the chief PRl elec- 
tion official. "There is a cultural inertia. 
Some PRl members have not understood 
that things have changed.” 


The reforms that Mr. Salinas has under- 
taken to that system began with voter rolls 
that were filled with Mexicans who some- 
how kept voting for the PRl long after 
their deaths. 

Following several state elections in 
which some opposition parties complained 
that the registry excluded many of their 
supporters, the validity of the' rolls has 
continued to be challenged, particularly by 
Mr. Cardenas's Democratic Revolutionary 
Party. 


Can Coelho, a Revival Expert, Pump Up Clinton at the Polls? 


, By. Stephen Engelberg 

Sew Yjork Times Service 

WASHINGTON ~ Last year, when Con- 
gress wa$ blocking final government approv- 
al of a genetically engineered hormone that 
had cost hundreds of .millions of dollars to 
devdop. tbe drug’s maker, the giant chemical 
concern Monsanto, turned for advice to a 
man renowned for his skills as a legislative 
strategist. . 

When Sun Diamond Growers, the Califor- 
nia agribusiness, organized a dinner earlier 
this year to retire the congressional campaign 
debt of Henry Espy, brother of Agriculture 
Secretary Mike Espy, it called on one of the 
most prolific fund-raisers in Democratic Par- 
ty history. . . 

And last week, when President Bill Ginton 
was looking for- a. gifted political pro who 
could rebuild tiw president’s popularity and 
rescue sagging Democratic prospects for the 
November ejections, he chose a man with an 
ciKyclopedk know ledge of the nation's con- 
gressional districts. 

The man whose expertise is so prized by so 


many disparate groups? Tony L. Coelho. who 
left Congress as House majority whip in 1 989 
for a lucrative career as a New York invest- 
ment banker amid accusations that he had 
improperly used bis political contacts to ar- 
range and finance a $100,000 junk-bond in- 
vestment for himself. 

Since leaving the House, Mr. Coelho has 
commuted to New York, where he has 
learned the intricacies of money manage- 
ment At the same time; he has kept his hand 
very much in the Washington game, and the 
announcement last week that he was accept- 
ing a three-month unpaid stint as chief strate- 
gist and spokesman at the Democratic Na- 
tional Committee brought mixed responses. 

While the coterie of Democratic campaign 
consultants and career politicians embraced 
it as a savvy move by a miscue-prone White 
House, others worried that Mr. Coelho was 
once again blurring the tines among business, 
politics and personal interest 

“I'm never happy unless 1 have several 
balls in the air” Mr. Coelho said in an inter- 
view. And that he has. 


Since Mr. Clinton’s election almost two 
years ago, Mr. Coelho has served as an infor- 
mal adviser :to the White House, attending 


several high-level strategy meetings a month. 
He is raising money for the legal defense 


fund that will help the president fight 
Whitewater accusations and the sexual na- 


Whitewater accusations and the sexual ha- 
rassment charged raised by a former Arkan- 
sas employee. And his former aides hold 
important posts in the Ginton administra- 
tion. 

What Mr. Coelho calls his “extended fam- 
ily” includes Thomas R. Nides, chief of staff 
to Mickey Kantor, the U.S. trade representa- 
tive: Marcia L Hale, head of the White 
House office that deals with governors and 
state legislators, and Kim Schnoor. senior 
aide to Mr. Espy. 

Leon E. Paneiia. his former colleague in 
the California congressional delegation, is 
now the White House chief of staff and was 
instrumental in the selection of Mr. Coelho as 
the new party overseer. 

At the same time. Mr. Coelho earns more 
than $1 million a year as president of a 


subsidiary of Wertheim Schroder & Co., a 
New York investment bank that manages 
nearly $4 billion for pension funds, corpora- 
tions and well-heeled individuals. 

Fred Wertheimer, president of the public- 
interest lobbying group Common Cause, says 
Mr. Coelho's roles at tne White House and in 
the Democratic Panv put him in a “quasi- 
public. quasi-private* 5 position that could al- 
low his banking company to take advantage 
of inside information about policy. 

“Thai's not an argument that he's going to 
do it” Mr. Wertheimer said. “But it's a dan- 
gerous situation." 

Mr. Coelho says he gains no business ad- 
vantages from his lies to the Clinton adminis- 
tration and never lobbies for companies or 
friends who need help from ihe government, 
although he acknowledges that clients fre- 
quently seek his counsel on the ways of 
Washington. 

“It happens ail the time." Mr. Coelho said. 
"I will give people advice. People will say to 
me, ‘Tony. I’m having this problem with Joe 
Schmo or X bill or agency. I will give them 


my best advice, based on 25 years in govern- 
ment. But if thev want something done. 1 say. 


mem. But if they want something done. 1 say. 
'Go see this law firm or that lobbyist.' ” 

Mr. Coelho said he saw no reason to dis- 
close his clients, as Mr. Wertheimer of Com- 
mon Cause has suggested he do. 


Lloyd N. Cutler, who accepted a tempo- 
irv stint as White House counsel, took a 


rary stint as White House counsel, took a 
leave of absence from his law firm to do so. 
And several of the political consultants who 
advise Mr. Clinton, including James CarviUe 
and Paul Begala. have publicly disclosed their 
client lists. 


Bui both Mr. CarviUe and Mr. Begala are 
paid for their work, under contract with the 
Democratic National Committee. In con- 
trast, Mr. Coelho said. "I don't get a cent.” 

“I’m an adviser” said Mr. Coelho. who. 
unlike some of Mr. Gimon's other informal 
advisers, has never held the permanent pass 
that grants unfettered access to the While 
House. "I don't have an office. 1 don't have 
hours. I’m a citizen of this country who is 
advising the people who run my party." 


Away From Politics 


Illinois Indicts 


• The man accused of ltiffing a doctor and his protective escort 
outside an abortion clinic was arraigned m Pensacola. Flori- 
da. on two counts of first-degree murder and one count of 
first-degree attempted murder in the wounding of wife of the 
escort. Paul HiD pleaded not guilty to all charges. The charges 
arise from the. deaths July 29 of Dr. -John. B. Britton, who 
performed abortions at the Pensacola Ladies Center, and Dr. 

. Britton's protective escort James Barrett. 

• The next bunching of the space shuttle Endeavour has been 
put bade until at least October after a last-second aborted lift- 
off. But next. month's Discovery flight will go ahead as 
planned. Although the shutdown of Endeavour's engines on 
the launching padwas the fifth such occurrence in 13 years of 
shuttle flights, none had come so close to scheduled lift-off, 

• Dropping his opposition to casino gambfing, Mayor Dennis 
Archer of Detroit said he would support gaming halls if It was 
dearly shown that their development would help revitalize the 
depressed city. The announcement came two weeks after city 
voters approved nonbinding proposals to allow development 
of Native. American-run gaming halls and riverboat casinos. 
Voters had fleeted four previous casino measures since 1976. 
Detroit joins a growing list of Midwestern cities that are 
considering casino gambling, including Chicago. Cleveland 
and Cincinnati, as well as Gary, Indiana, and Flint, Michigan. 

• About 100400 American victims of asbestos exposure at the 
workplace have won a payout of $L3 billion, in a settlement 
with 20 manufacturers. Ron Motley, an attorney for the 
plaintiffs, said the ruling “puts an end to 27 years of bitter 
litigation” marked by “asbestos gridlock ” Asbestos litigation 
has already cost U.S, companies $7 billion. At least 17 
asbestos defendant companies have gone bankrupt. 

• The second of fiopr teen-agers charged with murdering a 
British tourist in Tallahassee, Florida, last Sept- 14 has agreed 
to testify for the state in exchange for a lesser charge. Gary 
Colley. H from Wilsden in northern England, was the imnm 
foreign visitor killed m Florida within a year's time. Deron 
Spear. 17, pleaded guilty to conspiracy, to commit armed 
robberv ana accessory after the fact. 


A Congressman 


1" SALON 


The Anaeiated Press 

CHICAGO — Representa- 
tive Mel Reynolds, Democrat 
of Illinois, was indicted Friday 
on charges of sexual assault ana 
obstruction of justice involving 
a former campaign worker, the 
Cook County state’s attorney 
said. 

The charges returned by the 
grand jury involved child por- 
nography, criminal sexual as- 
sault, aggravated criminal sexu- 
al abuse of a child and 
obstructing justice, said Andy 
Knott, a spokesman for the 
state attorney. 

Mi. Reynolds disclosed the 
investigation last week. He has 
denied wrongdoing and said 
Tuesday that he would be vindi- 
cated. 


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forrinSs-v qJPj fiver, 'rhouacuto* seafood. 
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TaL42-£l >270. 


LECL0S5AINIE-MARJE 

cmd 4 s Bowered terrace, 

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YUGARAJ 


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Page 4 


SATURDAY SUNDAY, AUGUST 20-21, 1994 r 


OPINION 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


rt'HUMIMl Hint T1IK NKW YOKk T1MKS ANII THU H.WHWmiN POST 


Back and Forth on GATT 


The Clinton administration fought for 
consumers when it signed a trade accord in 
April with more than 100 other countries 
in Morocco. But it besmirched its record 
when it sent Congress implementing legis- 
lation that contradicted the Marrakesh ac- 
cord in downs of places. U was as if the 
Commerce Department had decided to 
protea powerful corporate friends in steeL 
textiles and cement rather than consum- 
ers or the vast number of U.S. companies 
that need to buy low-cost foreign goods. 

Then House and Senate committees 
took the administration's draft and made 
it worse. Conferees will meet soon to 
hammer out final language — providing a 
chance to fix the wrongs. 

At issue are anti-dumping statutes, 
which require foreigners to sell in America 
at fair prices; foreign companies may not 
sell at prices either below what they charge 
in their home country or below their cost 
of production. But the United States and 
other countries manipulate anti-dumping 
laws to shut out imports that are not 
dumped. The Marrakesh accord tries to 
limit this protectionist practice. 

The accord says that the United States 
must make a fair comparison between 
prices at home and abroad. But the Sen- 
ate committee, at the insistence of Ernest 
Hotlings of South Carolina, proposes a 
formula which, by treating profit differ- 


ently at home and abroad, would artifi- 
cially deflate the calculation of prices 
that some foreign businesses charge in 
the United Slates — and make conviction 
for dumping near certain. 

The accord recognizes that production 
costs typically decline for new companies 
during a break-in period; Washington is 
supposed to calculate a foreign company's 
costs at the end of the break-in period. But 
the administration and congressional com- 
mittees propose making such costs appear 


high by using an earlier period. 

" . accord allows countries 


The Marrakesh 
to retaliate only if domestic industry has 
been harmed. To show harm, the United 
States would have to demonstrate substan- 
tial imports compared with the size of 
domestic production. House and Senate 
committees, with administration support, 
propose to make U.S. production look 
small — and dumping look harmful — by 
ignoring a substantial part of UJS. output, 
known as captive production. That refers 
to goods made not for sale but for use in 


other goods — a computer business's pro- 


duction of semiconductors, for examp] 
in Marrakesh, the Clinton administra- 
tion stood for open trade and economic 
growth. At home, it proposed sizable doses 
of protectionism. The conferees will now 
decide which policy is the final one. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Sri Lankan Legacy 


After 1 1 years of civil war and a violent 
parliamentary campaign. Sri Lankans 
gave most of iheir votes on Tuesday to the 
opposition socialist People's Alliance, end- 
ing 17 years of dominance by the market- 
oriented United National Party. The likely 
result will be a coalition government led by 
Chandrika Bandaranaike Kumaratunga, 
whose parents have both served as prime 
minister and whose politician husband 
was assassinated in 1989. But her pro- 
spects are uncertain. Her parliamentary 
margin is narrow, and another election is 
scheduled in November to choose a presi- 
dent. an office with broad powers. 

What seems sadly certain is that Sri 
Lanka will not recover the optimism and 
peace that graced its birth in 1948 as 
Ceylon (the name was changed in 1972). 
In the first decade of independence, reli- 
gion and ethnicity came to dominate the 
country's politics. The Sinhalese majority 
is mostly Buddhist, and the Tamil minor- 
ity is predominantly Hindu. 

The sectarian genie was loosed by Mrs. 
Kumaratunga’s father. Solomon Bandar- 
anaike. Oxford-educated and bom to a 
prominent Sinhalese Christian family, he 
converted to Buddhism on returning to 
Colombo. His party came to power in 
1956. the 2.500th anniversary of Buddha’s 
attainment of Nirvana. Capitalizing on the 


fervor, the prime minister promoted Bud- 
dhism and made Sinhalese the official lan- 
guage. handicapping the minority Tamils 
in the competition for civil service jobs. 

The argument over language stirred 
communal riots. The prime minister re- 
treated a little to allow “reasonable use" 
of Tamil, and was murdered in 1959 by a 
Buddhist monk. So began a tragic cycle 
as Tamils resorted to insurgency, provok- 
ing government reprisals and repression, 
leading to an ill-fated intervention of 
Indian troops in Sri Lanka to disarm 
Tamil militants. Rajiv Gandhi, who sent 
the soldiers, was killed in 1990. probably 
by a Tamil terrorist. Whenever any lead- 
er. Sinhalese or Tamil, proposes compro- 
mise. cries of sellout arise from one or 
another community, periodically under- 
scored by assassinations. 

That is the dismaying legacy that con- 
fronts Mrs. Kumaratunga, who is already 
assailed as too soft or too hard. Her 78- 
y ear-old mother, who has served two terms 
as prime minister, is said to be considering 
a run for the presidency. Americans can 
only wish Mrs. Kumaratunga well as she 
tries to carry out her promises of a new 
peace initiative with rebel Tamils. Sri Lan- 
ka deserves belter than remaining an ob- 
ject lesson on sectarian haired. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Why Altman Had to Go 


As deputy secretary of the Treasury. 
Roger Altman had standing and reach 
within the Cinton administration that 
were considerable. He came to Washing- 
ton this time around not just as a onetime 
friend of the new president but also and 
more importantly as a man of consider- 
able experience and accomplishment. 
Having served as an assistant Treasury 
secretary in the Carter administration, he 
was thought to be familiar with the ways 
of Washington. He had emerged as a 
central figure on the president's econom- 
ic team for his roles in the successful 
passage of Bill Clinton's deficit reduction 
plan and the North American Free Trade 
Agreement. By all accounts, he was one 
of the administration's brightest stars. 
Now all that has come to an end. 

Roger Allman joins a long list of pub- 
lic figures who have been forced to under- 
go the pain of leaving jobs they have 
enjoyed. As in many or the other cases, 
his withdrawal has not been pleasant to 
watch. To observe the Senate Banking 
Committee’s Don Riegle (of the Keating 
Five) and Alfonse D 1 Amato (of ethical 
lapses) acting as if it were scandalous for 
men of their probity to have to deal with 
the likes of Mr. Altman is a bit much. If 
any two senators know what it means to 
be suspected of breaching the public 
trust. Messrs. Riegle and D'Amato surely 
must. Bui leave Mr. Altman should. 

This is not because he breached any 
laws or the technical standards for ethical 
conduct for executive branch employees. 
Independent Counsel Robert Fiske and 
the Office of Government Ethics, respec- 
tively. cleared him and other Treasury 
and White House aides of such charges. 
But Mr. Allman, through his failure to 
provide a complete and candid account- 
ing to Congress of his knowledge of con- 
tacts between the White House and the 
Treasury Department over the Resolu- 
tion Trust Corporation’s Whitewater 
probe or of discussions of his recusal 


E lans, severely damaged his own crcdi- 
ility and his department's. 

Mr. Altman does not stand accused of 
betraying the public trust for personal 
gain or of lying to Congress. But in at- 
tempting to wheel and deal his way 
around the White House and to be a 
protector of the Clintons' political for- 
tunes (neither purpose compatible with 
the responsibilities of his Treasury job), 
he exemplified political ambition foolish- 
ly. even recklessly pursued. In resigning 
on Wednesday, he acknowledged that 
leaving his post was “the proper step to 
lake." President Clinton, while express- 
ing regret, had no choice but to agree. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


A Year for Rethinking in Japan 


Forty-nine years after its surrender in 
World War II. Japan remains steeped in 
denial, torment and revisionism regard- 
ing its true role in that conflict. Tokyo’s 
inability to truly come to terms with its 
militaristic past continues to haunt the 
nation and disappoint its neighbors and 
allies. However. Tomiichi Murayama. 
should he survive in a time of revolving- 
door changes of Japanese prime minis- 
ters. plans to make 1995, the 50th anni- 
versary erf the war’s end. a year for self- 


reflection and apology to Japan's victims. 

rill befortnit 


The task will be formidable; already 
debates and reflections have begun in 
newspapers and television broadcasts. 
Educating the Japanese public is itself a 
monumental task. Generations of post- 
war Japanese have virtually no objective 
knowledge about Japan's aggression in 
Asia because government-sanctioned text- 
books amply ignore much of that era. 
Even worse are the politicians who persist 
in whitewashing Japan's brutal past 
— Los Angeles Times. 



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After Mexico Votes , die Old Will Still Resist the New 


C OXCATLAN CAVE. Pueb- 
la. Mexico — The cave, real- 
ly an enormous rock shelter up on 
a cliff face, looks out upon what 
is called a thorn forest, a thick 
green canopy of mesquite pierced 
by hundreds of straight soaring 
organo cacti. Beneath it In this 
weirdly primal landscape, lie 
many barrancas, stony dry river- 
beds that become raging torrents 
when there are thundershowers in 
the surrounding mountains. 

These mountains, green now 
in the rainy season, enclose 64- 
kilo meter- long Tehuacin Val- 
ley. H drops slowly from the hills 
below the great snowcapped Ci- 
tlaltepetl. at 5.750 meters the 
highest peak between Alaska 
and the Andes, down to neigh- 
boring Oaxaca state. The Valley 
feds like a world unto itself. 

It was here on a June day in 
1960, after what that the Ameri- 
can paleobioiogist Richard Mac- 
Neish calls “a long hot walk on 
the edge of the mountains,” that 
he ananis party came upon Cox- 
catlan Cave. Digging there rix 
months later they found three 
tiny half-inch-long corncobs, the 
first of more than 12.000 from 
the cave that they would date to 
nearly 7.000 years ago. “These 
are the oldest corncobs ever 
found." Mr. MacNeish reported. 
They still are. 

Tehuacan Valley, in a way like 


By Richard Critch field 


com itself, holds the key to Mex- 
ico's election on Sunday. As Mr. 
MacNeish and an international 
team of scientists were to discov- 
er. the cave provides the oldest 
evidence of the invention of agri- 
culture, irrigation and villages 
yd found in the Americas. 

More advanced civilizations 
— Maya, Aztec, Inca — grew 
up elsewhere. But to stand and 
look out from the cave is like 
looking from the ruins of one of 
the Mesopotamian ziggurats. 
You keep thinking: Inis is 
where it all began. 

From 1960 to 1973, Mr. Mac- 
Neish was able, in painstaking 
detail to trace how Mexican cul- 
ture evolved in nine stages over 
12.000 years, from primitive Es- 
kimo-like cave dwellers who 
hunted soon-to-be extinct mam- 
moths. miniature horses and an- 
telope in 10,000 B.C„ to the first 
cultivators of corn beans, squash, 
avocado, chili and amaranth 
around 5.000 B.C_ to the first 
priestly communities in 200 B.C. 

Migrants speaking ancient 
NahuaiL still heard in many of 
the villages today, displaced the 
valley’s original Popoloca- and 
Mazatec-speaking inhabitants 
(but they are still around, too) in 
the 13th century. They founded 
city-states that paid tribute to 


: empire 

luiy and in 1520 pledged loyalty 
to the Spanish conquistadores of 
Hemfin Cortfe. In the 1530s. 
Franciscan friars came to estab- 
lish Catholicism and build, in 
the next 40 years, several village 
churches that are still in use. 

Continuity is most marked in 
the valley’s villages, where com. 
beans, squash and chili remain 
the main crops, still often tilled 
with oxen and hoe, and amaranth 
is being reintroduced. It was 
banned by the Spaniards since 
the spinach-like vegetable's grain, 
was mixed with the Wood ; of hu- 
man sacrifices to make idols. 

Ancient irrigation systems are 
being revived, and there are such 
age-old rituals as the Mataoza, 
or “killing." when each Novem- 
ber shepherds from the moun- 
tains bring down their goat 
herds for slaughter. 

Most profound of all. going 
back to those early cave dwell- 
ers and surviving all those thou- 
sands of years of cultural 
change, is the meso- American 
belief that all life emanates 
from the earth, which demands 
sacrifice, not self-gratification. 
Nahautl -speaking villagers here 
have no word for land owner- 
ship and instead say piao, which 
means “keep” or “guard.” 


. So when Mexico’s Harvard- 
educated President Carlos Sali- 
nas de Gortari, modern-minded 
and inspired by Adam Smith's 
free market philosophy, makes 
sweeping reforms to allow vil- 
lagers to buy and sell old com- 
munal ejidd land, even to for- 
eigners, or plans to end 70 
percent price supports to peasant 
villagers, for thar corn (theoreti- 
cally in 15 years but effectively _in 
about half that time), he coil-' 
fronts a. design for living that in 
Mexico's 96,000 villages has out- 
lasted almost any other on earth. 

Mexico seems to be culriirally 
destabilizing. Political strife has 
erupted in every village in Te- 

huac&n Valley. 


In Altepexz; where the Insti- 
tutional Revo 


.levoJutionaiy Party 

(PRI) is in power, the municipal 
government refuses to give 
SlOO-pcr-bcctare farm support, 
payments to anybody bat PRI 
members. In Cbilac, PRI stal- 
warts have driven the -elected 
leftist Party of the Democratic 
Revolution (PRO) government 
from city hall, so they meet in a 
privatehome. 

In Cbapulco. angry villagers 
from the rightist National Ac-, 
tion Party (PAN) blocked a 
main highway for several days 
after their pnest was deported, 
accused (falsely, as it -turned 
out) of arming peasants. 


For a Transition Government to Prepare for Democracy 


M EXICO CITY — A broad-based group 
of citizens has been trying to impress 
upon Mexico's political establishment that 
Sunday's election is merely a starting point 


By Jorge G. Castaneda 


wealthy, improve income distribution, in- 
crease social t 


And 


for transition in a country where democracy 
of day. 


has yet to see the light of day. 

The coalition of some 70 academics, writ- 
ers. union leaders and former cabinet offi- 
cials is known as Grupo San Angel, for the 
traditional neighborhood of Mexico City 
where its first meetings were held. Since 
early June it has had freewheeling discus- 
sions. usually over lunch at members’ homes, 
with the three leading presidential candidates 
and President Carlos Salinas de Gortari and 
Interior Minister Jorge Carpizo. the chief 
electoral crffidaL Last week it met with some 
of Mexico's wealthiest and most powerful 
businessmen, and it has been negotiating an 
encounter with the Zapatistas in Chiapas. 

The group is determined to contribute to 
as clean and widely accepted an electoral 
process as possible, and to broker an agree- 
ment among the three main candidates on 
what will happen after Sunday, thereby de- 
fusing the tension surrounding the election. 
It has had partial success on both counts. 

The winner of the presidential election 
will probably receive around 40 percent of 
the vote. At least one of the two losers will 
almost certainly question the fairness of the 
process; armed groups in Chiapas and else- 
where in the country will do the same. 


Hence the question of gpvernability. / 
the answer, according to the group, lies in a 
government of national concord, whose 
composition and platform would truly re- 
flect the exceptional conditions Mexico 
finds itself in today. 

The government's program should stress 


l he government s program should stress 
two basic goals: profound, substantive polit- 
ical reform, and the type of social reform 




that a country with Mexico's gaping in- 
equalities is clamoring for. 

In a sense, what the group is saying is that 
whoever wins the election, the actual politi- 
cal outcome should be pretty much the 
same. As Carlos Fuentes. a founding mem- 
ber of the group, put it, Mexico might end 
up with a lousy president but a good govern- 
ment doing the right thing. 

Many in the group believe that the gov- 


ernment should rest on a power-sharing 


agreement among the three main political 
parties, the business sector, the intellectual 
community, nongovernmental organiza- 
tions and the grass-roots social movement 
that has sprung up in recent years. 

Some policies will have to remain more or 
less the same — the North American Free 
Trade Agreement, trade liberalization, pri- 
vatization and foreign investment. Some 
have to change — so as to raise taxes on the 


and infrastructure spending 
and make it possible for workers to fight 
equitably for higher wages. • 

This arrangement would last for a limited 
period, perhaps a couple of years, after 
which Mexican democracy would begin to 
take root and truly significant, competitive, 
free and fair elections could be held. 

Matters have been left unattended for too 
long in Mexico. Many- members of the 
Grupo San Angel bold that the country is. 
too polarized, too mistrustful and too bereft 
of democratic tradition to solve all of its 
problems with this one election. 

It has never been dear to Mexicans that 
the way to change governments or political 
systems is through die ballot box. Mostly, 
things here have changed by other means. 

If Sunday's election delivers a victor, and 
a margin of victory, that only frustrates 
and deeply disappoints millions, some will 
follow another road — the one the Zapatis- 
tas chose last Jah. II The sense of frustra- 
tion and despair that' could quickly engulf 
Mexico if the Institutional Revolutionary 
Party wins, cleanly or not, could be devas- 
tating for the country. 


In CoxcatlAn* political fight- 
ing has led to fatal shooungs. 
These are all ancient villages 
going back at least 2,000 years. 
8 It's the same stoiy all over 
rural Mexico. The mysterious 
and media-conscious Chiapas re- 
bel leader Subcommands Mar- 
cos, despite his ski cap, pipe and 
warmed-over Vleicong-styte jar- 
eon. makes sense when he says 
that the American -educated 
economists who run Mexico (the 
PRI presidential candidate, Er- 
nesto Zedillo, went to Yale) need 
to take a step back in their rush to 
modernize Mexico and say : This 
is the country we are and mists 
what we have, and anyone who 

wants to deal with us will have to 

take this reality into account” 

So do Americans. Willy-mlly, 
Mexicans and Americans share 
a common fate when Mcrican- 
Americans make up 25 million 
of the 260 million American 
people in 1994 and are projected 
to rrtstire. up 50 million of 325 

millio n in 2020. 

At the time of Mexico’s 1910- 
1917 revolution, 10 percent of 
the population erf 13 million fled 
into the United States. Mexico 
has 92 milli on people now. but 
the second largest Mexican ur- 
ban population, after Mexico 
City, is in Los Angeles. 

Tehuacin Valley provides 
some good examples of these 
new ties. A million years ago it 
lay under the Gulf of Mexico, 
and when it drained, first into a 
lake and then into a valley, fos- 
sils of invertebrates and vast salt 
deposits were left behind. One 
mountainside village, Zapotit- 
i&n, has existed on salt produc- 
tion from communally^ owned 
salt water springs for millennia. 
Eight years ago, one young vil- 
lager ventured to New York 
City; there are close to 500 Za- 
pfiHtlAn men there now. 

As far as 1 can teD after a 
summer in the valley, all mi- 
grants to tire United States, legal 
or illegal, in time come home 
again, while those to Mexico 
City tend to stay there. This sug- 
gests the strength of Mexico's 
cultural pull on its people. 

However Sunday's election 
and its . aftermath come out, 
Mexico is fundamentally en- 
gaged in a struggle between the 
modem,, postindustrial world 
and one of the human race's old- 
est continuous-belief and culture 
systems. ‘The weight of 12,000 
years of human development is 
on the side of Coxcat&n Cave. 


The writer, a political scientist and longtime 
critic of the government, hosted the first- meet- 
ings of the Grupo San AngeL 'He Contributed 
this comment to the Los Angeles Times. 


The writer's latest book is “ VH - . 
lagprs," an updated account of 
village life . around^ the. .world, fie 
contributed ihis comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


The Earth Isn’t Flat, 



an 


W ASHINGTON — August is 
the traditional month for 


By Charles K rauthamme r 


reflecting on the atomic bomb. 
Next August, tire 50th anniversa- 
ry of the bombing of Hiroshima 
and Nagasaki will be the occasion 
for even more reflection. In com- 
memoration. the National Air 
and Space Museum in Washingr 
ton is preparing an exhibit. 


On display will be more than 
the Enola Gay, the 


ay, the B-29 that 
dropped the bomb on Hiroshima. 
The walls of text and choice of 
exhibits will display also the de- 
gree to which elite American mu- 
seums, like universities, have fallen 
to the forces of political correct- 
ness and historical revisionism. 

The original script for “The 
Last Act: The Atomic Bomb and 


the End of World War H" drew 
fierce criticism from veterans, 
most notably the Air Force Asso- 
ciation. Air and Space was forced 
by that criticism to set up an 
internal review team that issued a 
report severely critical of tire tone 
and content of the original script. 

Some of the review team's re- 
commended changes have been 
made, but the original script be- 
trays tire ideology and intentions 
of the curators. It said of the 
Pacific War endgame, for exam- 
ple, that “for most Americans 
... it was a war of vengeance. 
For most Japanese, it was a war 
to defend their unique culture 
against Western imperialism.” 


It is an exhibit with dozens of 
wrenching photos and touching 
artifacts from Hiroshima, heavily 
weighted toward those from wom- 
en and children. “Misting from 
this exhibit,” noted the review 
team, “are other representative ar- 
tifacts belonging to soldiers, fac- 
tory workers, government offi- 
cials, etc.” This in a museum that 
sports a German V-2 rocket dis- 
play accompanied by 13 photo- 
graphs. exactly one of which 
shows any victims. 

It is an exhibit, in short, that 
subtly and not so subtly casts the 
Japanese as victims, the kamikaze 
pilots as heroes, and the Ameri- 
cans as the vengeful heavy. 


Pick Up the Key to the Waldheim File 


N EW YORK — The papal 
knighthood conferred on 
Kurt Waldheim remains a mys- 
tery that can be explained only 
by Pope John Paul II, who does 
not. But more important mys- 
teries remain about the former 
secretary-general of tire United 
Nations. Now and at last Con- 
gress has been handed the op- 
portunity to reveal any answers 
that are within the files of 
American intelligence. 

Representative Carolyn Ma- 
loney. Democrat of New York, 
has just introduced tire War 
Crimes Disclosure Acu H.R. 
4995. It would push the Central 
intelligence Agency to disclose 
relevant parts of the Waldheim 
dossier, which has been locked in 
its files for decades. If the CIA 
refuses, for the first time it would 
have to give some good, specific 
and appealable reasons. 

The mysteries go far beyond 
the question of what Lieutenant 
Waldheim of the Wehimachi 
knew or did when he was an 
intelligence officer in the Bal- 
kans during World War 11. 

After the war he lied about 
his war record, completely hid- 
ing his intelligence duty during 
the German massacres in the 
Balkans. How many Western 
and Communist foreign offices 
and intelligence agencies knew 
the truth? There is no question 
that some did. The evidence ex- 
ists that the Yugoslavs knew for 
many years, which meant that 
the Soviet Union and selected 
other allies did. too. 

And it is known that somehow 
original reoords of a list of want- 


By A. M. Rosenthal 


ed alleged war criminals on 
which his name appeared never 
surfaced during western inqui- 
ries into Mr. Waldheim's past 
Without the deletion of the in- 
telligence record and the war 
crimes list with his name, the 
man could never even have been 
considered as secretary-general. 

So the mysteries surrounding 
the success of that lie. and what 
relations Mr. Waldheim might 
have had with countries that kept 
his secret, involve not just one 
rather boring man but the con- 
duct of international diplomacy 
after the war. To boil it down: 
Who used whom for what? 

Any information that exists in 
US. files does not belong to in- 
telligence bureaucrats but to the 
public. Do we really have to say 

that so many years after the war? 

Yes. The State Department 
has revealed parts of its files — 
including the excruciatingly em- 
barrassing fan letters about him 
that kept coming from the U.S. 
Embassy in Vienna. They were 
disclosed to Professor Robert 
Hercstein of the University of 
South Carolina. But the CIA 
refuses to give the public a peek. 
The agency keeps invoking pro- 
visions of the Freedom of Infor- 
mation Act that allow some 
“national security" and intelli- 
gence material to be kept secret. 

On May 25 on this page. I 
reported Mr. Herzstein's belief 
that the Information Act should 
be amended to deny government 
agencies the right to conceal in- 


formation relating to war crimes. 
Almost immediately. Represen- 
tative Maloney began to move. 
Last year she led members of 
Congress who urged Argentina 
to open its own locked files. 

So on Wednesday Ms. Ma- 
loney and six co-sponsors were 
ready. They introduced the bill 
before the House committees on 
government operations, the ju- 
diciary and intelligence. It re- 
quires release or information 
about people who, like Mr. 
Waldheim, are barred from en- 
try into the United States for 
war crimes acts committed dur- 
ing World War II. It is not a 
license to rummage through 
even their confidential files, but 
it narrows the “security" provi- 
sion against disclosure to infor- 
mation that would specifically 
damage current security or in- 
telligence activities. 

And it demands that the gov- 
ernment agencies adopt a “rea- 
sonably segregate" informa- 
tion standard so that pertinent 
information not a matter of cur- 
rent security can be separated 
out from real security matters 
and made public. 

The bill is not likely to come 
up for a vote until the next Con- 
gress. The sponsors can use the 
time to gather more support. 
Ms. Maloney, if re-elected, in- 
tends to reintroduce the bill im- 
mediately. It is an overdue piece 
of legislation, important to jus- 
tice and history. The key to the 
Waldheim file is right there on 
the table, waiting for Congress 
to pick it up and use it. 

The New York Times. 


Under the heading “Historical 
controversies." the exhibit, asks. 
“Would the bomb have been 
dropped on the Germans?” It be- 
gins ns answer thus: “Some have 
argued that the United States 
would never have dropped the 
bomb on the Germans, because 
Americans were more reluctant to 
bomb Vhite people’ than Asians." 

Allied reluctance to bomb 
“white people” will come as news 
to the survivors of Dresden (Kurt 
Vonnegut among them). The fact 
is that me A-bomb was built to be 
used against Germany. “Some 
have argued"? Some have argued 
that the earth flat. .Some nave 
argued that the Holocaust never 
happened. We Americans don’t 
give wall space in our national 
museums to such “controversies." 

The essential if undeclared 
judgment of the authors of this 
commemoration is that the Unit- 
ed States should never have 
dropped the bomb. Not just be- 
cause of the amply displayed 
horror but because other mea- 
sures — “some combination of 
blockade, firebombing, an Em- 
peror guarantee, and a Soviet 
declaration of war” — “would 
probably have forced a Japanese 
surrender.” (“Would probably” 
is now changed to “might.”) 

These kinds of cozy, easy judg- 
ments made at the safe distance 
of 50 years and 7.000 miles have 
earned the deserved contempt of 
those like Paul Fusseft, author of 
classic critical studies of World 
War I and World War XL who 


were there. Writing on the 36th 
anniversary of Hiroshima, in a 
piece subtitled (quoting William 
Manchester) “Thank God for the 
Atomic Bomb,” he pointed out 
the horror and cost of the alterna- 
tive to the bomb, the planned 
invarion:Of Japan. 

“On Okinawa, only weeks be- 
' fore Hiroshima, 123,000 Japanese 
and Americans killed eacn oth- 
er.” Moreover, “invasion was not 
just a hypothetical threat ... It 
was genuinely in train, as l know 
because I was to be in it.” 

Mr. FusseO was a second lieu- 


tenant leading a rifle platoon in 
to be 


.... _ 1 shipped 

to the Pacific for the invasion of 
Honshu. The bomb meant that 
“we were going to live; we were 
going to grow up to adulthood 
after all” — and so would hun- 
dreds of thousands of others. 
American and Japanese. 

pie Air and Space commemo- 
ration of Hiros hima promises to 
be an embarrassing amalgam of 
revisionist hand-wringing and po- 
litically correct guilt. What to do? 
General Paul Tibbets, the man 
who commanded the Enola Gay, 

' has the right idea: hang the plane 
in the museum without commen- 


tary or slanted context. Display it 

lib* T —1 JjJ-,. 


like Lindbergh’s plane, with silent 
ifet 


reverence and a few lines explain- 
ing what it did and when. 

Or forget the whole enterprise 
and let the Japanese commemo- 
rate the catastrophe they brought 
(Mi themselves. 

Washington Past Writers Group. 


m OUR PAGES; 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894s French in Africa 


ROME — The Italian press is just 
now largely occupied with the 
question of Tripoli and Morocco, 
especially with reference to the 
movements of the French in that 
quarter. A telegram from Tangier 
states that France has concentrat- 
ed at the Moroccan frontier 
20.000 men. It is further alleged 
that the action of the F rench au- 
thorities in sending a Consul to 
Fez without the authorisation of 
the Sultan has provoked discon- 
tent Despatches from Tripoli de- 
clare that France is daily increas- 
ing the extent of territory around 
TnpoU occupied by her forces. 


Prince. It is understood that the 
prince’s renunciation is due to a 
*° ve »2? ia ^£ e : which the heroine 
was Mile. Zizi Lambrino, a beauti- 
ful girl belonging to the best Rou- 
manum society, who conquered 
the Prince’s heart a year ago. 


1944s Russian Ihnist 


1919: Kingdom for Love 


PARIS — Prince Carol of Rou- 
manta. heir-apparent to the 
throne, has forivarded to his fa-' 
ther. King Ferdinand I_ a letter 
renouncing his title of Crown 


LONDON - [From our New 
York edition:] Two Russian ar- 
mies. wheeling northwestward 
between Warsaw and the lower 
border of German East Prussia 

•5F? r iiL e *** , S F localil > cs today 
[Aug. 19], and Berlin said that 
other Soviet troops attacking 
aJong ihe eastern rim of East 
Prussia had punched out a 
breachm major depth” in west- 
ern Lithuania, The. new central 

roof ^ armies was on a 
Hffl-mile front and the Moscow 
bulleun also told of improving 
Russian positions cast and 
northeast of Warsaw. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBllNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 20-21, 1994 


Page 5. 


Sknp 


son 


r Japs 



Records on 
Detectives 


By Michael Janofsky , 

,Vw York Tima Server - 

LOS ANGELES — Lawyers 
for OJ. Simpson have filed a . 
motion seeking access to per- 
sonnel records of the four po- 
lice detectives who investigated 
the slabbing deaths of his for- 
mer wife and' a friend of hers. 
They specifically asked for any 
records that would show if one 
detective. Mark Fuhrman, had 
a history of racial bias. 

The motion represented the , 
first time that allegations of tm- - 
ism had been raised in official 
court records of the case. .• . . . 

The lawyers contend in the 
motion, which is to be argued in ~ 
court Aug. 31, that tbe records 
are “critical to central issues" 
regarding the credibility of the 
detectives and the “bidden mo- 
tives and potential prejudices'' 
of Mr. Fuftnnan. 

Defense attorneys described 
Mr. Fuhrman as “a dangerous 
officer with a propensity to cre- 
ate false information against . 
African-American defendants.'" . 
He was the detective who recov- 
ered a right-handed, blood- 
stained glove on Mr. Simpson’s . 
property that appeared to 
match a left-handed elo 
found at Nicole Brown Sira 
son's townhouse. 

Mr. Fuhrman’s attorney, 
Robert H. Tourtelot, vehement- 1 
ly denied the allegation and 
said the defense's attack on Ms 
client was “a desperate act by a 
desperate attorney." 

Mr. Simpson's trial on the 
two murder charges is sched- 
uled to begin Sept. 19. He has 
pleaded not guilty. 

The defense lawyers accused 
the detectives of misstating 
facts and acting improperly, to 



TREASURE: Plutonium at Issue 


K^rLHoni Kmtchs Tbt AM.<uied Prev. 


At the funeral: Secretary of State Christopher and foreign ministers Kooijmans of the Netherlands, Kink el of Germany, and Claes of Belgium, j dts^ 

NATO Puts Off Decision on Successor to Secretary-General 


>ve 


imp-. 


Reiners 

BRUSSELS — The North Atlantic Treaty Orga- 
nization >31 leave the question of who should be- 
come secretary-general of the alliance until next 
month, an albance spokesman said Friday. 

“There will be no formal consultations on the 
succession to Manfred Wdmer before the beginning 
of September ” he said. 

Foreign and defense ministers from many NATO 


nations and some from Eastern Europe attended a 
memorial service for Mr. Wdmer on Friday. He died 
a week ago, aged 59, after a long battle against 
cancer. He haa held the post of secretary-general 
since 1988. 

Diplomats said NATO could not afford much 
delay in choosing a successor to Mr. Wdmer when 
the alliance's credibility was being constantly tested 
by the twists and turns of the war in Bosnia. 


NATO also wants to decide on a replacement in a 
way that avoids the public disputes that marred the 
European Union's recent choice of a new president 
for the European Commission. 

Thorvald Stoltenberg, a former Norwegian for- 
eign minister and now a United Nations peace 
mediator in former Yugoslavia, has emerged as a 
possible front-runner for the NATO job. along with 
the former Italian prime minister. Giuliano Amato. 


Continued from Page 1 
sians’ approach, Americans 
fear, will add to the long-term 
security risk. 

Russia will keep its surplus 
weapons plutonium in a pure 
form, the form in which it is 
used in weapons, thus making it 
attractive to terrorists or na- 
tions that want such a weapon: 
as little as four kilograms, or 
less than 10 pounds, a chunk 
smaller than a fist, would be 
enough. 

And Russia's planned breed- 
er reactors would produce more 
weap on s-u sable plutonium, 
slightly less pure but also readi- 
ly usable in weapons. 

' Even without thefts, the more 
plutonium that remains in an 
easily accessible form in either 
country, the easier it would be 
for a future Russian or Ameri- 
can government to rebuild a gi- 
ant nuclear arsenal quickly. 

While American officials be- 
lieve their own stockpiles are 
safely guarded for now, they 
argue that disposal of plutoni- 
um now could help protect fu- 
ture generations. 

The United States, which 
first synthesized plutonium and 
has spent billions of doDars and 
created substantial damage to 
the environment and human 
health in tbe process, is ready to 
dispose of it. 

lut this is a costly and diffi- 
cult enterprise, to be pursued 
with none of the sense of na- 
tional mission that attended its 
manufacture. 

“Plutonium has essentially a 
negative economic value," said 
John Gibbons, the White 
House science adviser, stressing 
that even using already avail- 
able plutonium as fuel in reac- 
tors would cost far more than 
using uranium. The United 
Stales argues that uranium, 
cheap now, will stay that way 
for decades. 


justify their request for a search 
warrant for Mr. Simpson's es- 
tate June 13, the morning after 
the bodies of Ms. Simpson and 
a friend, Ronald L Goldman, 
were found at Ms. Simpson's 
townhouse. ... . . . 

Defense lawyers asked for 
records for the last five years on 
the four officers — Mr. Fuhr- 
man. Philip Vannatter, Tom 
Lange and Ronald Phillips- The 
defense said it wanted to check 
whether any of the officers had 
falsified documents or evidence 
in a case, had failed to follow 
department policy or had had 
contact with Mr. Simpson or 
the two victims. ... 

The defense .also asked for.* 
wealth df background on Mr. 
Fuhrman, including anything 
that would describe - acts of al- 
leged prqudice or Mas" based 
on race, sex or ethnicity. 

The motion, filed Thursday, 
includes several documents, in- 
cluding psychiatric reports al- 
ready made public by the de- 
fense. in which Mr. Simpson's 
lawyers assert that Mr. Fuhr- 
man expressed “negative opin- 
ions against African-Americans 
and other people of color." ' 

The motion also alleges that 
there was a 1987 complaint in 
which Mr. Fuhrman was ac- 
cused of shooting a suspect and 
then, the motion says, helping 
“plant a weapon near thelallen 
suspect" -as a way to justify his 
action. 

In a 1991 lawsuit. Joseph J. 
Britton alleged that he was shot 
six times by Mr. Fuhnoan and 
another officer in that incident, 
on April 7, 1987. - 

Mr. Britton's lawyer. Robert 
Deutsch. said testimony during 
a trial last fall indicated that 
Mr. Fuhrman bad picked up a 
knife from one location and 
placed it near Mr. Britton's feet. 

A substantially different ver- 
sion of the same incident 
emerges 
prosecutors 
vestigaie 

officers. Those prosecutors 
found no wrongdoing on the 
part of the officers. 


BOSNIA* Concern OverArmsBan UN Halts Airlift 

UN officers acknowledge FofloWIM Dcfttit 
that after 28 months of war, the ® 

Bosnian Army has transformed (jf PeaCCkCGOCr 
itself from a raztae guerrilla -T 


BOMB: Russian Admits Thefts of Nuclear Materials 


Continued from Page 1 
at least a year for the Bosnian 
Anny to transform itself. 

By that time, however, it 
could find itself holding even 
less territory than the 28 per- 
cent of Bosnia it now controls 
in alliance, with the Bosnian 
Croats. 


itself from a 

band led by crooks and black 
marketeers into a tough infan- 
try force striving to achieve 
strategic parity. 

Last winter, Muslim forces 


"We'd wind up snatching do- concluded a peace agreement 


feat from the jaws of victory, 1 
said Mr. Carter, a UN civilian 
affairs offnaal in Bosnia. “Lift- 
ing the. aims embargo .would 
just mean more destruction. It 
would take the Bosnians years 
to make real gains." 

Some of these officers sug- 
gest that tbe best way forward 
for tbe Bosnian Army is to con- 
tinue to rdy oq. illegal arms 
shipments via Croatia and 
slowly build up the capacity to 
attack. Jane’s Sentinel, a Lon- 
don-based military newsletter, 
has reported that the Sarajevo 
government purchased $160 
nnBkntt'in weapons between 
April 1992 and April 1994. 

As long as the aims embargo 
stays in place, they argue. Presi- 
dent Slobodan Milosevic of 
Serbia will be under pressure at 
least to make it more difficult 
for Serbs in Bosnia to get the 

^bfioalfysealed Serbia's bor- 
der with the Serbian-held Bos- 
nian territory an Aug. 4, after 
the Bosnian Serbs rebuffed tbe 
latest partition plan. 

The plan, which is endorsed 
by the Unitai States, would di- 
vide Bosnia roughly in half. 
Several parts, adding up to 51 
percent, would be controlled by 
the federation of Bosnian 
Groats and Muslims. The re- 
maining 49 percent would be 
run by the Serbs. 

Lifting the arms embargo has 
long been a goal of the Clinton 
admini stration. : It argues that 
the regional ban on arms sales 
has denied tire lightly equipped 
Muslims the means to defend 


with Bosnian Croats, against 
whom they fought a vicious war 
for a year. The renewed alliance 
launched its first combined at- 
tack last week against Serbs 
near tbe Bosnian town of Vares. 

Still, UN officers say the 
Muslims and the Croats are not 
ready to attack Serbs without 
UN troops on thdr flanks. 
..According to a report this- 
month by the London-based 
International Institute of Stra- 
tegic Studies. Serbian tanks 
outnumber Croat and Muslim 
tanks by 330 to 1 15. The Serbs 
also have an edge in artfllety 
pieces, 800 to 600. 

The main problem, according 
to Mr. Carter and several senior 
UN officers, is that the Bosnian 
Army does not know how to 
conduct offensive operations. 


A genre FroncrPresae 

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herze- 
govina — The airlift of food 
and other aid into Sarajevo was 
suspended Friday as the United 
Nations opened an investiga- 
tion into the death of a French 
soldier. 

A United Nations spokes- 
man said the airport was re- 
opening to military traffic but 
that the airlift would remain out 
of operation. 

An investigation was 
launched after a French soldier 
was killed in Sarajevo on Friday , , 

in what Paris described as an -lered sharply over what was in 


Continued from Page 1 

including plutonium-239. Euro- 
pean experts say they believe 
the plutonium comes from Rus- 
sia. but Moscow denies it. 

Mr. Novikov also denied 
speculation that the smuggling 
of nuclear material was being 
controlled by organized crimi- 
nals. 

St, Petersburg officials said 
Thursday they had arrested 
three Russians who tried to sell 
a 60-kilogram (130-pound) 
metal container of radioactive 
material in Kaliningrad, a Rus- 
sian enclave between Poland 
and Lithuania on the Baltic. 

On Friday, the officials dif- 


“intolerable” action against a 
man whose mission was “entire- 
ty in the service of peace." 

Initial findings showed that a 
paratrooper, Jean-Marc Car- 
bonnd, 22, was deliberately 
shot in the head with a 5.56mm 
bullet while he was on guard at 
an observation post between 
Muslim and Serbian sectors. He 
was the 22d French soldier to 
be killed in Bosnia. 


the container, but it seemed 
clear the object did not contain 
weapons-grade material. 

Bemd Schmidbauer. chief of 
staff to the German chancellor, 
Helmut Kohl, is to arrive in 
Moscow on Saturday to “find 
out how much the Russians 
know and how we can increase 
safeguards," according to a 
German Embassy spokesman. 

The German police fear some 
Russian officials are involved in 


the smuggling of nuclear mate- 
rial he said Friday. 

Mr. Schmidbauer, Mr. 
Kohl's intelligence coordinator, 
made the comment in discuss- 
ing why the police did not no- 
tify their Russian counterparts 
of a “sting" designed to entrap 
a suspected nuclear smuggler. 

Russian officials dismissed 
the German’s visit as unneces- 
sary. “There should be no worry 
because there is nothing to wor- 
ry about." said a spokesman, 
Vladimir Kamorovsky. “Our 
service has registered no theft 
or loss of uranium or plutonium 
from Russian nuclear facili- 
ties." 

Despite the denials, Russian 
atomic-energy officials are in- 
vestigating three main sites 
from which they suspect diver- 
sons of weapons-usable nucle- 
ar materials of the kind recently 
seized in Germany. U.S. nucle- 
ar experts said. 

All the sites are in Russia, 
and all are involved in the pro- 
duction of a fuel for nuclear 
reactors known as MOX, or 
mixed oxide fuel, a combina- 
tion of the oxides of uranium 
and plutonium. 


Dr. Alexander De Volpi, a 
physicist at the Argonne Na- 
tional Laboratory in Illinois, a 
main research center of the En- 
ergy Department, said in an in- 
terview that Minalom officials 
bad told him the investigations 
began in recent days. 

The first of the Russian sites, 
Mr. De Voipi said, is Mayak, 
also known as Chelyabinsk-65, 
or the Kysbtym complex. Lo- 
cated 1,500 kilometers (900) 
miles east of Moscow, near the 
Urals, not far from Kazakh- 
stan. it is a large industrial cen- 
ter where many reactors pro- 
duce all kinds of nuclear 
materials, including MOX. 

The second site, Mr. De 
Volpi said is the Bochvar Insti- 
tute of Inorganic Materials in 
Moscow. It conducts nudear 
studies on plutonium and is ap- 
parently involved in handling, 
analyzing and testing. 

The third site is the Institute 
of Atomic Reactors, on a 
branch of the Volga River in 
Dimitrovgrad 450 miles east of 
Moscow, ft has a large reactor, 
known as the BOR-60, a 60- 
megawatt device that can use 
MOX (Reuters, AFP, NYT) 


need for weapons is a git 
security risk and an economic 
liability," said Hazel R. 
O’Leary, secretary of energy. 

The United States is ponder- 
ing methods of making its sur- 
plus weapons plutonium as un- 
usable as possible, perhaps by 
mixmg it in glass with highly 
radioactive wastes from the plu- 
tonium's creation, and burying 
the mixture deep underground, 
or perhaps by running it 
through reactors, bunting some 
and rendering the remainder 
highly radioactive. 

Russian officials could not 
disagree more. “This is a sacri- 
lege," said Viktor Muiogov, di- 
rector of the Institute of Physics 
and Power Engineering, at Ob- 
ninsk, who refers to plutonium 
as “our national treasure." 

To the Russians, plutonium 
is a prize pearl that the United 
States now appears ready to 
throw out with the oyster shells. 

“We have spent too much 
money making this material to 
just mix it with radioactive 
wastes and bury it." said Viktor 
Mikhailov, the Russian minis- 
ter of atomic energy. 

In Russia, the dam£2 e to the 
environment and to - human 
health has been substantially 
larger and is probably still con- 
tinuing. 

But the Russians believe that 
in future decades, the world nu- 
clear industry will revive and 
uranium will become scarcer 
and more expensive, making 
plutonium more attractive as a 
fuel 

“The 21 st century will belong 
to nuclear power," Mr. Mikhai- 
lov said in an interview. He also 
argued that a future generation 
of plutonium-burning reactors 
could have the added benefit of 
destroying the most toxic de- 
ments of nudear waste. 

Another senior official, Yuri 
VIshevsky, who is the head of 
Gosatoxnnadzor or GAN, the 
Russian equivalent of the U.S. 
Nudear Regulatory Commis- 
sion, said in a separate inter- 
view that breeders were the only 
rational way for plutonium to 
be used. 

“Will our children and 
grand chil dren be thankf ul to US 
when they experience a lack of 
fud in the future?" he asked. 

For now, Russia’s elaborate 
construction plans may be little 
more than a pipe dream. Mina- 
tom, as Mr. Mikhailov’s minis- 
try is known, is so cash- 
strapped that it is months 
behind in paying salaries to 
weapons scientists and other 
nuclear workers, who some- 
times seize their workplaces and 
stage Strikes. 

There is no money to clean 
up nudear waste dumps even 
within the Moscow city limits. 

Still design work is continu- 
ing at Obninsk, about 60 miles 
(100 kilometers) from Moscow. 

Though the United States 
once envisaged using plutoni- 
um to make dectridty, now it 
thinks that would be uneco- 
nomic and would present ter- 
rorists with inviting targets for 
theft 


RWANDA: Border May Be Shut 

Continued bun Page 1 departure of its forces takes 
leave before a UN mandate ex- place under tbe right cimun- 
pired at midnighT Sunday. stances and in a way designed 
In a rare joint statement con- to keep Rwa n da n s in their 
finning the planned withdraw- country.*’ 
al President Francois Miner- The 1 ,200-member French 
rand and Prime Minister contingent in the zone is being 


Edouard Bahadur said it was up 
to “the Rwandan authorities 
and the international comm uni- 


replaced by Ghanaian and 
Ethiopian troops under UN 
command. Although the new 



of armor from the Yugoslav 
Army, once the fourth -largest 
fighting force m Europe. 


ities beginning today. 

Mr. Mitterrand and Mr. Bal- 
ladnr made no reference to the 
new exodus, which this week 
led the United Nations, the 
United States and numerous 
nongovernmental organizations 
to urge France to continue to 
provide protection to refugees 
m the safe zone. 

The French leaders merely 
noted that “France has done 
everything to ensure that the 


SAUDIS: New Council of Advisers Is Treading Sofdy 


Coatiooed from Page 1 

it,” said one member, “tot if we 
disagree with the government 
on something, the king de- 
cides.” 

Islamic scholars have not 
reached a conclusion on .wheth- 
er decisions made by the .court- 
ed are binding, according to 
Fahd Haritin. 

If 10 -members agree that an 
issue is important, they can 
schedule a discussion and for- 
ward thdr conclusions U> ibe 

for the last 20 years and brother 

of King Fahd, was tbe driving 
force behind the council’s cre- 
ation. Like all members of the 
royal family, be is defe nsive 
about tbe lack of popular repre- 
sentation in government. 


“AD government employees 
are Saudis,” he said in an inter- 
view. “Therefore, they partict- 
pate.” - 

In its brief history, the coun- 
cil has worked cm its internal 
structure, procedural rules and 
such broad policy matters as 
education, the environment, 
and press and publication laws. 

There was one day of excite- 
ment in the fives of the media- 
shy “consultants." The Majlis 
haid a hearing. There on its 
testifying, was 
min- 
isters apd members of the ruling 
House, of Sand. 


ty to assume their responsibil- government in Rwanda has 
: * s — ■ * — = — : — “ J — * pledged not to invade the area, 

it has said that it will eventually 
occupy the region. 

Mr. Mitterrand and Mr. Bal- 
ladur said France had carried 
out its planned mission of put- 
ting an end to massacres of ci- 
vilians by paramilitary gangs 
and soldiers of the deposed 
Hutu-dominated government. 
It has also “made the interna- 
tional community recognize" 
its responabilities, they added. 

Although some of the 2*500 
French troops dispatched to 
Rwanda two months ago have 
already returned to France, sev- 
eral hundred are expected to 
remain in Zaire to help in hu- 
manitarian activities. _ 

Some Western diplomats 
have attributed France's deci- 
sion not to extend its military 
intervention in Rwanda to the 
fact that its relations with the 
new Tntti-dominated govern- 
ment are strained by France's 
previous support for the former 
Hutu-led government. 

But they have also noted that 
appeals for France to keep its 
troops in Rwanda serve as im- 
plicit recognition that it was 
right to have intervened in the 
first place. 


the Yemeni crisis and other is- 
sues. Prince Sand stayed before 
the council so long that he had 
to delay a trip to Syria. 

“It was an outstanding ses- 
sion,” one member said. “He 
was open. He gave us the main 
foundations of foreign policy, 
and we had a question-and- an- 
swer period. It boosted the mo- 
rale of the Majlis. We felt re- 
spected, we feat our opinions 
counted.” 

As il becomes more difficult 
for a system of absolute rule to 
navigate effectively between Is- 
lam and changing times, these 
first-generation legislators are 
bcpeftil that their body will ac- 


Princc Saud al Faisal, Saudi quire a more substantial role. 
Amina’s foreign 1 minister, spent “it’s going to develop, but it 

several hours outlining the needs patience," a member pre- 
kingdom’s foragn policy. The dieted. 


council cross-examined him on 


Surge of Energy In Space Detected 


Rearers 

SYDNEY — Australian as- 
tronomers said Friday they 
were recording the most violent 
event detects m the Milky 
Way galaxy in the past 100 
years and speculated that the 


enormous energy source could 
be a black hole swallowing a 
star. 

A black bole is a star that has 
collapsed oa itself, creating a 
national force so strong 
cannot escape. 


“Saudi Arabia made a major 
adjustment with the Majlis al 
Shura, though it may not be the 
U.S. Congress," a government 
minister said. “The Majlis does 
not represent groups, but it may 
have people from all walks of 
fife.” 

Will there ever be freedom 
tionS? “Not in my lifetime,” 
said one legislator. “But if they 
give us more authorityas we go 
along, it will be good." 


Tire ^foong Side of tire Law 

BORDEAUX — A police- 
man who drove in a drunken 
daze down the wrong side of an 
autoroute and caused an acci- 
dent in which he and four oth- 
ers were hurt has been suspend- 
ed from duty, the public 
prosecutor here said Friday. 


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THE EPISCOPAL CHURCHES 
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Evangetai church lor the Encttsh i 
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SubuPiSS. 9:45; Woreh*x 10*5. Chtidwfs 
Church and Nursery. Youth ministries Dr. BC. 
Thomas, pastor. Calf 47.51.29.63 or 
47.49.1529 for Waimafax 
HOPE INTERNATIONAL CHURCH (Eva h- 
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de Le Defense. TeL- 47.735154 
or 47.75.14.27. 

THE CONSERVATIVE JEWISH COMMUM- 
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vet Famijr swnca & Stnday Stfioci a 1030 
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For nformadon 48 78 47 94. 

SAINT JOSEPH'S CHURCH (Roman 
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STRASBOURG 

ST.MBAN(Angtcan)airEgSsedesDomri- 
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Vi d<we ft roe de rUnrverSd*. Slrusbcurg 
(33)88350340. 

TOKYO 

ST. PAUL INTERNATIONAL LUTHERAN 
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374a Wdrshp Sewiw 930 am Sundays. 
TOKYO UNION (>Wf^.near<>ricfesan- 

tto subway stiTd. 34000047, Worship ser- 
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USA 

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FLORENCE 

ST. JAMES CHURCH, Sut 9 am. Rie I & 
1 1 a.m. RHe H. Via Bernardo Ruceliai 9. 
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FRANKFURT 

CHURCH OF CHRIST THE KING (EpiSCO- 
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MUNICH 

THE CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION. Sun. 
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School, Nuaary Care provided. Ssyttotfsfras- 
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TeL- 430964 8185. 

ROME 

ST. PAUL'S W1THIN-THE-WALLS. Sun. 
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Heme. TeL 396408 3339ojM« 474 3569. 
WATERLOO 

ALL SANTS' CHURCH 1st Sui. 9 & 11:15 
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BERLIN 

INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 
BERLM Hoftentun Sr 13. (SMaUri. BtHs 
study 1045. vnrshp » 12XO each Sunday. 
Charies A. Wartori Pastor. Tel ; 030-774- 
4670. 

BONN/KOLN 

THE NnjRNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH 
OF BONN/KOLN. Rhelnau Strafe* 9. Kfiln. 
Worchf 1 XKI pm. Gahrin Hogue. Pastor. 
TeL (02236) 47021. 


BRATISLAVA 

BUeStudyh 

ch Zrinskeho 2 1630-1745. 

JosepKubdk, Tefc 31 67 79 

BREMEN 

INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH (Eh- 
^teh language) meets at Evangafah-FraJtfo 
Chfich Kreuzgemande. Hohentohastrasse 
Hermann-Bose-Str. (around fte owner tram 
the BatwtoQ aroday worship I7fl0 Ernest 
D. Water, pastor. Td 04791-12877. 
BUCHAREST 

INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH. 
Snda Pope Rusu 22. 300 pm Cwtacl Pas>- 
■orMte Kemper. TeL 312 3860. 

BUDAPEST 

tntematicnalBaiDfelFelmishp.OBnX'DU.te 
(main entrance TapoksarM u 7, immedttdy 
behind ten entrance). 1030 Bfcfa study. 6X0 
pm Pastor Bob Zbhcten. TeL 1(56116. 
Reached by bus 11. 

BULGARIA 

INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 
World Trade Center. 36, Drahan Tzarikov 
Efivd. Worship 11:00. James Di*e, Pastor. 
TeL 704367. 

CELLE/HANNOVER 
INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH, 
Whchiulen Stosse 45. Cale 1300 Wbrshe. 
1400 Bite Study. Pastor Wert CampteK, Pfi 
(05141)46416. 

DARMSTADT 

DARMSTADT/EBEHSTADT BAPTIST MIS- 
SION. Bite study & Worship Sunday 1030 
a m. Stacfcnission Pa-Ebeistadl Buescheterr. 
22, Bite study &3Di worship 10 c45l Pastor 
An Wat*. TeL Q61 556006Q1 6. 

DUSSELDORF 

INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH En- 
glsh Worship and Children's Church Sun- 

Evang efcch - Ftejadtehe Gemeinrte n F fa - 

F^wJ^AlSnn^^r^ wetorntTS 

further Wcnn at ion caB the pastor Dr. WJ. Da 
Lay. TeL- 021 1-4KM57. 

FRANKFURT 

INTERNATIONAL CHRISTIAN FELLOW- 
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Sodenerstr. 11-18. 6380 Bad Hombng. pto- 
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end Taurus areas, Germany. Sunday wor- 
ship 09.45. nursery + Smda^school iftOO, 
women's bite studies. Housegroups - Sun- 
day * Wednesday 1930. Pastor M. Levey, 
member Euopean Baptist Ccnverfaon. "De- 
dae Hs glory amenc^t ftere*™. 1 
BETHEL INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST 
CHLVICH Are Dachsbarg 92. Fiaridiil aM. 
Sunday worship 11XO am and &QD pm. Dr. 
Thomas W. HL pastv. TeL: 069549559. 
HEIDELBERG 

GRACE INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST 
CHURCH, hdusme Sb 11, 6902 Sanctau- 
aan. Bite driv QMS. Worst* lino. Pastor 
Pad Henchx. TeL 06224-52295. 

HOLLAND 

TRMTY BAPTIST S.S. 930. Worship 1030, 
nursery, warm fellowship. Meets at 
Blwmcamplaan 54 in Wassenaar. 
TeLD175l-78Q34. 

MOSCOW 

INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST FELLOWSHIP 
Meetng 11Q0: Wno Carter BufldSng 15 Druz- 
Dairfinnkavskaya UL 5ft Floor. Hal 6. Metro 
Stabon BanteJnaya Pastor Brad SfflmeyPh. 
(095)1503291 

MUNICH 

INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH OF 
MUNICH f-fotstr. 9 Engteh Language Ser- 
vices. Bite study 16:00. Worship Service 
1701 Pastor's phone S90BS34- 

PRAGUE 

Wem&enal BapSsi Frfcwshp al fte 

Czech Baptist Church Vnohradska • 68, 
Prague 3. Al metro stop Jrrtra Podebrad 
Sunday a.m. 11:00 Paslor: Bob Ford 
(02) 311069a 


WUPPERTAL 

in ter na tonal Baptist Church. Engfeh. Ger- 
men. Persian. Worshfo 1030 am, Selergr. 
2l. Wuppertal - SbertekJ. Al danominattons 
welcome. Mans-Dieter Fraund, pastor. 
TaL' 020BM696384. 

ZURICH 

INTERNATIONAL BAPTIST CHURCH of 
Wadwswfl (ZOtieh). Switzerland, Peler 
Jenkins Lore rub enKtr. 11 CH-8B05 
Rtchtercvril. Worship Sendees Sunday 
roomings 1 1CO. TeL 1 -7002812 


ASSOC OF WT1 CHURCHES 
M EUROPE & MIDEAST 


BERUN 

AMERICAN CHURCH IN BERUN, cor. of 
Cfery AJfoe & Potsdamer 9tr- SS. 930 am, 
Worahp 1 1 am TeL- 000013X21. 

BRUSSELS 

THE INTERNATIONAL PROTESTANT 
CHURCH OF BRUSSELS. Sunday School 
9 l 30 am and Ouch 1ft45 am Kaenbag. 
19 (at the Ini. School). Tel.: 673.05.81. 
Bus95.Tram94. 

COPENHAGEN 

INTERNATIONAL CHURCH ol Copenha- 
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i 


i 









ART 


Saturday -Sunday. 
August 20-21. 1994 
Page 6 



. ' v.".* ■ - f 




The Start of a Revolution in Painting 


Imtrruuitvwl Herald Tribune 


P ARIS — In ihe lute 
16th century, an ex- 
traordinary develop- 
ment that would 
change the entire course of 
Western art look place in the 
Italian city of Bologna. Without 
giving up the traditional scenes, 
biblical or mythological, for 


SOUKEN MELIK1AN 


which they reoeived commis- 
sions. three artists from the 
Carracci family shifted their at- 
tention away from the conven- 
tions required by the subject to 
the life and nature that lay be- 
hind iL 

How the two brothers. Agos- 
lino and Annibale Carracci 
and their cousin Ludovico, did 
this in their drawings can be 
seen at the Louvre, in the Pavil- 
ion de Flore, until SepL 26. 
Catherine Legrand. the Louvre 
curator who put together the 
show of 103 sketches, all drawn 
from ihe museum collection, 
called it “La rtforme des trois 
Carracci." The three Carraccis, 
she argues, reformed Western 
painting by looking at antiquity 
and nature. The new style sig- 
naled the end of the Mannerist 
school, then steeped in deca- 
dence. 

The magnificent pageant of 
sketches, many displayed for 
the first lime, makes the case. 
But it tells another more curi- 
ous and more gripping story. If 
the Carraccis looked at real life 
as no one had done before them 
in Europe, they confined what 
they saw to their drawing 
sheets. What filtered through 
into their finished paintings was 
polished up beyond recogni- 
tion. 

The transformation process 
is illustrated with striking effec- 
tiveness by the sketches done 



the composition dominated by 
a god and goddess in ancient 
Roman attire: A winged Eros 
gazes at them. It is all pompous 
and artificial. 


Port of the reason for the dis- 
tance between the paintings, and 
drawings could be that some of 
these, now believed to be prepa- 
ratory studies, may actually have 
been done freely, for their own 


sake. Agostino’s sketch of a 
dwarf with a big parrot isexecut- 



dwarf with a big parrot is execut- 
ed cm the same sheet as a larger 


figure of a seated woman, pro! 
blv Mary. There is no conn 


mm w 


bly Mary. There is no connec- 
tion between the two and this is 
dearly not a sheet of preliminary 
sketches. Yet, the dwarf recurs, 
basically unchanged, in a triple 
portrait Agostino must have 
liked it and picked it up when 
the need arose. 


“St. Sebastian Thrown Into the Cloaca Maxima" bv Ludovico Carracci 


forward to gaze at a very small 
crucifix left lying around as ir 
looters had just left the place. 
The expression is one of frozen 
tired sadness. There are no 
frills, no background. The por- 
trait is as powerful as it is terse. 

It has been used virtually as is 
in the picture of “St. Francis.” 
now in Rome. But the concise- 
ness is lost. The saint kneels in a 
mountainous landscape. An- 
other monk is praying in the 
distance. The mise-en-scene is a 
source of distraction. 


minute adjustments — one 
hand is raised open, the crossed 
legs do not open so widely. All 
the tension is gone. 


When the sketches are inte- 
grated into large composition, 
the change can border on cari- 
cature. A strident study of a 
youth seen head and shoulders, 
turning back his head, which he 


tilts with an ambiguous, half- 
pleading half-rakisn smile, has 


for paintings focusing on a sin- 
gle figure, particularly those by 


gle figure, particularly those by 
Ludovico, who comes out as a 


Ludovico, who comes out as a 
far greater artist than has been 
realized. 

One of the most remarkable 
drawings by Ludovico shows an 
aging Franciscan monk kneel- 
ing in the dust, his gnarled ar- 
thritic hands spread out with 
difficulty. The face, half 
drowned in darkness, bends 


Even where no props are 
added, the vigor of the drawings 
is lost in the painting through 
overdramadzation. Ludovico’s 
masterpiece is, perhaps, the red 
chalk study of an old man seat- 
ed on the ground, shaking with 
grief as he raises his clenched 
fists at the sky. His eyes are 
hardly visible. The furrows 
coming down along the mouth, 
the contracted facial muscles, 
even the toes that seem to grip 
the ground, are enough to con- 
vey the old man's convulsive 
despair. 

The sketch was the model for 
“St. Peter Repenting.’* with 


become an angel floating on a 
cloud in the picture of “San 
Rocco" in the church of San 
Giacomo Maggiore, Bologna. 
The saint walks below, with a 
lacrymose expression. Not 
much of the real life sketched in 
the study remains here. 


B UT it is not just the 
artifice of the required 
iconography that ac- 
counts for the meta- 
morphosis. In his drawings, in- 
cluding studies for elaborate 
compositions, the artist oper- 
ates with a freedom and sponta- 
neity that he cannot, or will not. 
recapture in the painting. In a 
study for the “Madonna dei 
Bargellini” in the Pinaooleca 
Nationale, in Bologna, a young 


giri raises her hand to present a 
ewer to Mary with a spring in 
her movement that has all the 
alacrity of adolescence. Mary 
looks down with a happy, 
slightly impish expression at Je- 
sus. depicted as a real baby, 
whom sne stops from falling off 
her lap. 

This is all gone in the picture. 
Jesus, in particular, has been 
changed into an infant-sized 
adult with curly hair (the baby 
had none) and' searching eyes. 
The sparkling chirp in ess of the 
first thought is gone. 

Agostioo’5 oeuvre reveals an 
even greater distance between 
the studies and the paintings. 
One of the gems in the show is a 
study of two women in the nude 
whispering to each other. The 
bust of another woman in the 
top comer right looks on with a 
quizzical expression as she puts 
her forefinger across her lips as 
if to urge secrecy. She adds to 
the lightheartedness of the 
scene. None of it survives in 
“The Marriage of Thetis and 
Peieas." now in Parma. The 
chatting women, turned into 
nereids handled in sculptural 
fashion, appear in a comer of 


Annibale carried these free 
drawings to their highest point. 
The portrait of an adolescent is 
a penetrating psychological 
study. Fresh intelligence, 
youthful sensitivity, restrained 
eagerness are conveyed all at 
once in the red chalk sketch 
done with care but never used 
fora painting. The bead is tilted 
bade in a posture that goes 
against conventional portrai- 
ture. Its modernity is striking. 

So is that of a landscape 
dashed off in a few strokes and 





* 


Hockney's drawing of Jonathan Silver is in Yorkshire show. 


Zooming in on Hockney 


Show’s Drawings Enhanced by Video 


squiggles of the pen dipped in 
brown ink. A huge human- 
faced sun disk laughs its way 
down behind the mountains. 
The squashed nose, pressed 
over a slope gives it a surrealist 
touch. 

That vein of fun can recur in 
the most sophisticated draw- 
ings. An unforgettable master- 
piece shows the Virgin. hands 
crossed, head tilled, done in vi- 
brating black curves. On the 
spur of the moment. Annibale 
inserted a beaming baby&i face 
over her shoulder. The wing of 
an angel is vaguely suggested. 


D AVID HOCKNEY. the great British 
transpl ant-Calif omi an artist is re- 
nowned for having created- some of 
the most iconographically vivid and 
recognizable paintings of the past 30 years — - 
col or- saturated evocations of comfort and lei- 
sure in the tradition of Matisse, though likewise 
in thrall to Picasso — but his first love was 
always drawing and, oa occasion, like his mas- 
ters. he will return to the simple medium of 
pencil-on-paper with a prodigious vengeance. 
Such has been the case over the past half year, 
across which he has created- hundreds of draw- 
ings of friends and dear friends, the dearest of ail 
these being his dachshund companions Stanley 
and Boodge. Sixty of these works form the core 
of a show on view at the 1 853 Gallery in the Salts 
Mill Complex outside his native Bradford in 
Yorkshire. England (through SepL 30). . 

The catalogue for the show is itself remarkable 
— “perhaps the first color catalogue ever or a 
black-and-white show," as the artist recently 
commented. 

Before shipping the show. Hockney tacked all 
60 of its images on the wall of-his studio in the 
Hollywood Hills above Los Angdes, and then, 
over the period of an hour, across two continu- 
ous takes, slowly scanned the entire lot through 
the lens of a high-eight, hand-held video camera, 
weaving in and out for details, contrasts,, and 
long shots. If a drawing can be said to provide 
the record of an artist's looking, at his subject, 
this video, which Hockney has m the meantime, 
set to music, affords an uncanny record of an 
artist's looking at his own process of looking. 

When it came time to design the catalogue, a 
few months ago. Hockney simply fed the video 
through ihe integrated processing unit of his - 
Canon laser photocopier, freezing on the desired 
details. As the copies emerged from the machine, 
however, his assistant sighed as to how they 
couldn't possibly be used — it was proving 
impossible to separate out the pinkish, bluish 
and yellow moiithazeof the video. But Hockney 
himself didn’t seem to mind; in fact, be insisted 
(characteristically, for he relishes all these sorts 


By Lawrence Weschler 


In the finished painting, the 
Virgin recurs but not the Taueh- 


Virgin recurs but not the laugh- 
ing mask. The modernity of the 
throbbing strokes has been 
erased. 

The Carraccis anticipated the 
way to modernity in their pri- 
vate works, though they did not 
see fit to keep u up in their 
pictures. 


In Italy, a Celebration of U.S. Sculpture 


By Susan Lumsden 


Other figurative works, like 
Harry Jackson's equestrian 


S ERAVEZZA, Italy — 
First explored by Mi- 
chelangelo on orders 
from the Pope, white 
marbled Monte Allissimo is a 
logical and beautiful backdrop 
for the 100th anniversary exhi- 
bition of the American Nation- 


al Sculpture Society. Many of 
the 110 works on exhibit were 


the 110 works on exhibit were 
sculpted from the finest “ sta - 
tuario bianco ” that was so de- 
sired by the Medici Pope Leo X 
for his family tombs in nearby 
Florence. 


bronze of John Wayne, were 
cast nearby in the foundaries of 
Pietrasanta and Camaiore. This 
region of quarries includes kilns 
for baiting terra-cotta, so realis- 
tically rendered in the show’s 
tiny portraits by Laura Ziegler 
who. like Jackson, is a local ce- 
lebrity. 

The fact that so many foreign 
sculptors pass through and even 
settle here along the Versilian 
coast prompted the municipal- 
ity of Seravezza to invite the 
National Sculpture Society to 


FOR SALE /SOLD 


Hendrix memorabilia: A sale 
of guitars and psychedelic 
clothes once owned by Ameri- 
can rock star Jimi Hendrix 
raised £205.000 (about 
S3 15.000) in a London auction, 
double the auctioneers' esti- 
mate. Bonham’s auction house 
said the main prize, a cherry red 
Gibson "Flying V” guitar, 
raised £46,000, again double 
the pre-auction estimate. Six of 


the multi-colored jackets fa- 
vored by Hendrix, who died at 
the age of 27 from a drug over- 
dose in London in September 
1970. 13 months after Wood- 
stock, attracted heavy bidding. 
One orange jacket fetched 
£38,000 and a striped wool 
jacket £33,000. A 500-record 
collection belonging to Hendrix 
went under the hammer at 
£17.000. 


hold its centennial exhibition in 
the renovated palace of Cosimo 
1 de* Medici. 

It is the first exhibition out- 
side the United States and is 
considered something of a figu- 
rative comeback by the Nation- 
al Sculpture Society whose 
members have created some of 
the most memorable monu- 
ments in the United States, 
such as the Sherman Memorial 
by Augustus Saint-Gaudens in 
Centra Park in New York and 
the presidential profiles by 
Guisom Borgjum on Mount 
Rushmore in South Dakota. 

“Apart from the public mon- 
uments. we have had no venue 
for a long lime." said Stanley 
Bleifeld. past president of the 
society and chief curator of the 
Seravezza show. “In New York 
until recently, they would look 
at you aghast if you walked into 
a gallery and said you were a 
figurative artist 

“It's not that figurative art 
was too academic — that can be 
good — it was simply saying 
nothing. Now that we’ve 
opened our membership to a 
wider range of sculptors and 
jurors, including those verging 


on abstraction, there's a new 
vitality.** 

Indeed, what is most striking 
is the energy exuding from the 
amassed human and animal fig- 
ures. From Toni Bruchert’s. 


emerging “Adam" to Richard 
Kislov’s fallen “Wrestler" the 


exhibition radiates life. 


photos by David Finn of works 
by past members like Gertrude 
Vanderbilt Whitney. Anna Hy- 
att Huntington and Harriet 
Whitney Frishmuth. 

The exhibition will be shown 
in London. Dallas and Utsuno- 
miya. Japan, in 1995. 


Another problem for sculp- 
tors is getting political approval 
for their work. “Getting a mon- 
ument through Washington can 
take years," lamented Bleifeld 
whose Navy Memorial (1985) 
was remade several times by 
politicians. The Vietnam Me- 
morial which started as an ide- 
ally abstract black granite wall 
is another example. “Soldiers 
had to be included, then wives 
and children. Then, the nurses 
wanted in. It’s a mess. 


Susan Lumsden writes about 
the arts from Florence. 


of paradoxes about mechanical reproduction) 
that the effect was forcing the viewer to gaze 
upon the underlying drawing all the more intent- 
ly. (The whole process of designing the catalogue 
was thereafter accomplished in a single weekend, 
with Finished .copies emerging from the presses a 
mere three weeks later.) “Actually, the volume s 
not really a catalogue of the show,” Hockney 
suggests. “It’s more like the book of the video. 

As indeed it is. Take, for example, the two- 
page spread devoted to Zoe Sflver. tbe daughter- 
of Jonathan Silver, the founding director of die 
Salts Mill complex (that's him,- incidentally, with 
the beard). The portrait of Zoe, seen, as it were, 
from a distance, evokes a seemingly blank, some- 
what timid, relatively plain teenage girl. But as 
the camera, zooms in, an altogether different, 
more knowing, more sensual persona emerges. 
Was this part of what Hockney, looking at her as 
he drew, saw from the beginning, or does he only 
notice it now. looking at how he looked? The 
catalogue is training us,' too. in how to see. 


OME of the most affecting drawings are 


those devoted to Stanley and Boodge — 
and here the aficionado of Hockney's 
Km#, oeuvre may sense a particularly pregnant 
subtext Hockney is famously gay, and from the 
very, first, back in -the '60s. he was famously at 
eare with his homosexuality. His work is strewn 
' with images of languorous young men, naked or 
hbt naked, asleep or merely lotting about The 
gaze is by turns grasping or cusping — loving, 
protective, celebratory. But with the advent of 
AIDS, such images have largely fallen out of 
HOckneys production — they bdOftgftia world 
tragically gone by, (Many of those men arenow 
dead.) Hockney himself seems-tobe much more 
celibate, or anyway his gaze does, but the intima- 
cy of that gaze persists and the palpable need for 
such intimacy, and today it gets lavished on his 
two do gg y, companions. Repeatedly ;be captures 
than mTangprous postures reminiscent of an 
earliertime. 


. Lawemx Weschier is -a staff writer with The 
;New Yorker and author of. .books on, among others, 
the artists Robert Irwin and David Hockney. 


New York’s Holocaust Museum 


By David W. Dunlap 

Nm York Times Service 


“For me. the secret of the 
Renaissance was the power of 
great and individual patrons 
who asked a lot or their artist 
who. in turn, put out. Society 
need not be a contraint but a 


N EW YORK — With 13 years of 
false starts behind them, the 
creators of the city's Holocaust, 
memorial say that they will fi-‘ 
naliy be able to start building the museum 
this fall in Battery Park City, at the tip of 
Manhattan, overlooking the potent sym- 
bols of Ellis Island and the Statue of Liber- 
ty- . „ 

Critical new financing — indeed, half 
the construction cost — will come from 
the Battery Park City Authority, under a 
lease that was signed Thursday. 

The gray granite museum will cost about 
S15 million. 

The building's hexagonal shape is meant 
to symbolize the six million Jews who were 
killed by the Nazis. Its geometry also re- 
calls the six-pointed Star of David, and 
thus serves as a reminder that the museum 


stimulus in forcing you to dis- 
cover something else." 


cover something else." 

The exhibition, which runs 
until Sept 5, also features 22 


ART EXHIBITIONS 



FRANCE 


COLLECTORS 


FONDATION 

DE 

L'HERMITAGE 


Bocooni • fihagaB 
Dali * de Chirico 
de Lempidsa 
L£ger • Magritte 
Pfird • Picasso 



let 

P £ IN T R E S'. 
DE 


ZAgftOWSKl 





Spink 
deal in 


is devoted as well to the people and culture 
that survived Hitler's onslaught 
As such, its collection indudes die dress 
issued to Rose Safro in 1944 on her arrival 
at Auschwitz from Cluj, Romania, and the 
dress that Fraoia Bratt Blum made from a 
bolt of blue-and-white checked doth given 
to her by the American liberators of Da- 
chau. 


“The- completion date is late 1996,” he 
- said. 

_■ Because the New York City Holocaust 
Memorial Commission, which is develop- 


ing the preyed, has changed its plans con- 
siderably over the years, it will no longer 
need the large parcel that it leased in 1986 
at the southern end of Battery Park City. 
Instead, it win build on a much smaller 
portion of the property closest to the Hud- 
son River sfaordmc. 

. The museum has been designed by Ke- 
vin Roche John Dinkdoo Associates. At 
the core of die building, Roche said, will be 
an 85-foot (25-meter) shaft the memorial 
itself, rising to a skylight from a pool of 
still water. 


The institution, formally the Living Me- 
morial to the Holocaust-Museum of Jew- 


ish Heritage, has about 13.000 artifacts, as 
well as the videotaped testimonies of 650 
Holocaust survivors and audio recordings, 
of another 3.000 survivors. 

The museum began its collection 'in 
1984. obtaining many artifacts by dona- 
tion from the survivors, in and out of New 
York City. It has been operating in make- 
shift quarters in an office tower on Madi- 
son Avenue. The new braiding is expected 
to draw 500,000 viators a year, said the . 
director, David Altshuler. 


. .The names of Holocaust victims might 
be displayed within this shaft Around me 
pen meter will be the exhibition spaces, on 
two levels. “The views from the top gallery 
are of the Statue of Liberty," Roche said, 
“the symbol of hope.” 


BOOKS 


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shape. War threatens over the 
French border, assassins are 
within the walls, folk are drop- 
ping dead on all sides of the 
beleaguered duke, and in the 
midst of it all, standing calm 
while the storm beats around 
them, are Maestro Leonardo da 
Vinci and his young acquaint- 
ance, the dwarf Niccolb. (Nic- 
co!6 is not, the author takes 
pains to say, actually a dwarf, 
just short; he is also, unlike the 
Maestro, hetcrosexuaL) 

“A Comedy of Murders,” 
George Herman’s second novel. 


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is a wild tide into farce and in- 
trigue, a sort of “Shogun” meets 
“A Comedy of Errors” under the 
aegis of Shedock Holmes. Leo- 
nardo is Holmes, of course, arro- 
gant and omniscient and grvm 
to enigmatic statements, with 
Niccri5 paying the role of the 
ever-willing, often bewildered, 
and eternally naive Watson. 

The suny begins in a reason- 
able Fashion, with a troupe of 
cammedta delTarte actors on 
the one hand, ^ the duke and a 
party out bunting on the other. 
Somehow connecting them is 
an assassination attempt In the 
background lurk Leans XII at 
France and the Borgia Pope Al- 
exander VI, laying a- plot 
against Milan. “War,” asserts 
Leonardo, “is always preceded 
by a land of general insanity,” 
and so it proves, as Herman 
gives himself Over to the spirit 
of the times. 

The first warning of the mad- 
ness to come is in uk names; A$ 
multisyllabic and thick on the 
ground as any Russian novel, 
they may prove difficult for the 
inattentive or interrupted read- 
er One actor is called variously 
Arlecchino (his stage character). 


Cano (his own surname), or Si- 
mone (his first name). The Duke 
of Milan is Ludovico/ Svqzza/Il 
More. Even H erman seems to 
find his- plethora of characters 
slippery: The falconer’s, asso- 
ciate, Mino Spinoio, is later re- 
ferred to as a carpenter and then 
a kitchen worker, and the author 
overlooks one or two bodies 
along the way. 


The ■ convoluted plot seems 
bent on driving the duke, if not 
the reader, mad. The answers to 
the two central, mysteries being 


■ 1B ^ aujaKillO UOUK 

investigated by Leonardo ana 

Niccofo are ah but lost in the 


Herman's difficulty in keep- 
ing track of his oorpses is under- 
standable, given the sheer num- 
bers. After 20 deaths he does 
not even bother to identify 

than, but by that time the dead 

are stacked like cord wood: 
kitchen maids and cardinals; 
army officers and spies, incom- 
petent assassins, gentlewomcu 
and courtiers. And the variety' 
of methods! They are poisoned 
and stabbed, strangled and de- 
fenestrated, drowned in a cess- 
pit and in a moat and in a horse 
trough, crushed by a marble 
Mock and a huge cross and the 
clapper' of a church bell, 
stomped by a stallion, eaten by 
rats, smothered in bird drop- 
pings, swallowed by a snake 
and torn to pieces by falcons. 


ft* 


DOMIC S 


i 

*ia i i 


• — — • t AWtfli AAA WAV 

. stampede. Of course, the facts 
of history determine how a his- 
torical novel has to end, even if 
Storytelling suffers. (Although 
why a tale set in 1498. that refers 
to chocolates, thermometers 
and centimeters should concern 
itself with historicity is difficult 
to say.) 

But heavens, this is not a 
mystery! This is farce, a grand 
and sweeping mockery of the 
darker side of human affairs, 
when one murder begets 10, # 
when the pope's son makes war ■ 
on a rightful ruler, and when. 


■v 


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only the commedia fool 
the sense, to see what is 




- 7 ™-. “v wuoi in 

8°ing on. The theme of Her- 
man s story is absurdity and ex- 
cgs^u^thaUs precisely -what 


S. 

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^ writer mys- ’ 














«: 



International Herald Tribune World Stock Index 6, composed of 
280 rntemaSonafy mvastahte stocks from 25 countries, compiled 
by Bloomberg BiisinessNbws. Jan. 1,1992 * 100- — - 
120 : : : ' - — — 




18M 1S4M 



The Max tracks US. doBar vefuas at nodes hr Tokyo, Maw, York, London, and 
Argentina, AustraHa, Austria, Boigfum, BoaM, Canada. ChO*. Danmark, Rntond, 
Franca, Qatmany, Hong- Kong, Italy, Hwdco, Nathwtands, Nam Zmftnd, Norway. 
Singapore, Spain, Swadwi, .Swfeadand and Vanaaudte. For Tokyo, fiew yak and 
London, the Index la composed id the SO tap issues h forms -at market captofcaoton. 
otfwntteo the ftsn top stocks am tracked. 




M. Pm. * 

M. 

• Pa*. ' 

• ft 


daw etea riunflf . . 

dm 

dm 

dnqp 

EiWfly 

11338 11331 +034 Capital Goods 

119.01 

11635 

+030 

Utfltbes 

13026 130JQ5.+446 taaRaMals - 

13382 

13368 

+0.10 

Finance 

117.97 11080 -0.70 Consumer Goods 

103.40 

10389 

-026 

Sendees 

122.08 121.75 +428 MMbmmm 

13222 

13221 

+0.08 


For morn Mxma&on about the index. BbooldeUsavailBbtefW of charge. 

Write to Trib Index, 1B1 Avenue Charles flb Gajfe, 92521 Notify Codex. France 


CHnmsttortaHwattTrlwn* 


Another Seoul Pothole for Automakers 


By Steven Brail 

Imenuaknuj! Herald Tribune 

SEOUL — Tbe Americas drive to 
open op Sooth Korea’s car market col- 
lided with this country's consumer na- 
tionalism Friday, as a government offi- 
cial charged that U.S. Trade 
Representative Mickey Kantor had 
written a “rude” letter that “demanded” 
South Korean officials use imported 
cars. 

The letter, which was written last 
month, was described in different terms 
by a Western diplomat, who told 
Agence Fraace-Presse it merely had sug- 
gested the government buy some foreign 


cars to send a signal to South Korean 
consumers, who nave shied away from 
them for fears of inviting tax audits. 

But it caused a ruckus in a nation that 
has kept its auto market virtually closed 
io imports to build up a domestic indus- 
try considered crucial to the country's 
prosperity. 

“Some officials complained that the 
U.S. demands were rude and amounted 
to intervening in internal affairs,” 
Chang Suk Hwan, first assistant minis- 
ter for trade, was quoted by AFP as 
saying. He added, *We’ve decided to 
forget about the letter, as it is unrealis- 
tic. 8 


The flare-up is a blunt reminder that 
although Seoul recently removed its 
most blatant legal bamers to foreign 
cars, Western automakers still face a 
near-Herculean task in devising strate- 
gics to penetrate a market that remains 
highly regulated and xenophobic. 

“lius market is big, and you can’t 
ignore it,” Daivd Jerome, vice president 
of General Motors Korea, said. “But we 
have yet to come up with anything that 
seems to work." 

As with die Japanese market. Western 
executives said the problem was not so 
much formal barriers to entry as non tar- 
iff barriers, such as perceived pressure to 


“buy Korean" and dealer networks con- 
trolled by South Korean automakers. 
Even as Seoul drops formal barriers, 
foreign automakers’ shares probably 
will remain small. 

“Korea basically is a dosed market, 
and that's die way it will probably con- 
tinue for a long tune,” another Western 
auto executive said. 

Foreign automakers sold only 1.840 
vehicles in South Korea last year, less 
thqn OJ percent of a domestic car mar- 
ket of 1.04 million, Asia’s second big- 
gest. In contrast. South Korean manu- 
facturers sold a record 2.07 million 
See KOREA, Page 9 


Japan Tobacco Price 
Seen Depressing Stocks 


Compiled br Our Sroff From bnpotrha 

TOKYO — Aggressive bid- 
ding at the government's sale of 
Japan Tobacco Inc. shares left 
the shares far overvalued and 
could depress the rest of the 
Japanese stock market, analysts 
said Friday. 

Individual investors bid as 
much as 1.9 million yen 
($19,000) a share for a stake in 
the world's fourth-laigest to- 
bacco company, which could 
raise the government's asking 
price for the next tranche of 
shares to 13 million yen, ana- 
lysts said. 

A price that high would leave 
the shares tittle room to rally 
when they are floated on three 
Japanese stock exchanges on 
Oct- 27, said Craig Chudler, 
managing director of Thomas 
Norton Associates. 

“If the price of JT shares goes 
up after they are listed, there is 
potential for the start of a re- 
covery in share prices." he said. 
“But if they go nowhere or de- 
cline, the market could really 
suffer." 

The government offered 

230.000 shares of Japan Tobac- 
co this week and plans to sell 

436.000 more in September, pri- 
vatizing a third of the company. 

If Japan Tobacco’s shares are 
priced at around 13 million 
yen. that would value the com- 
pany at Z6 trillion yen. 


Many analysts said Japan 
Tobacco's shares should be 
priced between 700,000 yen and 

1.0 million yen, given the com- 
pany's performance and out- 
look. 

But Mr. Chudler estimated 
the shares were worth just 

330.000 yen, taking into ac- 
count the performance of simi- 
lar companies and stripping out 
Japan Tobacco's landholdings, 
which he said were not liquid 
assets and should not be includ- 
ed in the company's valuation. 

“Privatizations are supposed 
to be good Tor a market, but for 
some reason Japan can't be like 
everywhere else,'' Mr. Chudler 
said, referring to the partial pri- 
vatization in October 1993 of 
East Japan Railway Co. that 
ended up snarling the stock 
market 

JR East shares jumped 
around 50 percent to 600,000 
yen. on the day of their listing 
before falling to 400.000 yen a 
month later. As JR East shares 
fell, the Nikkei stock average 
followed, leaving many inves- 
tors bruised. 

Japan Tobacco markets 82 
brands of cigarettes. In the year 
ended March 31, it sold 272.9 
billion cigarettes, capturing 
82.1 percent of the domestic 
market and had profit of 15.9 
billion yen on safes of 2.7 bil- 
lion yen. ( Reuters. AFP) 


Bulis: Bundesbank Backs Away 

Short-Term Securities Were a Flop With Investors 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Less than a month after 
they became legal, the Bundesbank on Friday 
took a swipe at Germany^ nascent money- 
market funds by canceling its sales of the kind 
of short-term securities they probably would 
have wanted to buy. 

The German central bank's move to with- 
draw its so-called Bulis from circulation is 
also an admission of defeat The Bulis — 
short for the German term for “Bundesbank 
liquidity paper” — have been a flop with 
domestic investors in the 18 months since 
their introduction. 

“While the Bundesbank had set aside its 
reservations about money-market funds, they 
basically continue to apply,” the central bank 
said. “The Bundesbank therefore prefers not 
to offer investment facilities for money-mar- 
ket funds itself and to encourage a trend 
toward a shift to short-term maturities in the 
financial markets.” 

The Bulis, of which there is about 21.6 
billion Deutsche marks ($14 billion) out- 
standing, will be offered once more, in Sep- 
tember, and then be discontinued. 

“The Bundesbank assume s that the public 
authorities will continue their policy of not 
issuing securities running for less than one 
year for the purpose of budget financing," the 
hank added. 

Peter Vietsch, a spokesman for Commerz- 
bank AG, a commercial bank whose subsid- 


iary recently introduced one of the first Ger- 
man money-market funds, said the new funds 
bad an ample supply of commercial paper, 
certificates of deposit and other short-term 
investments and did not need to buy Bulis. 

Guenther Skrzypek, a managing director of 
JJ 5 . Morgan Investment GmbH in Frankfurt, 
which once offered Bulis to clients, said their 
disappearance from the market would have 
no major impact. “We didn’t call an emergen- 
cy meeting,” he said. 

“We won't miss than,” said a fund manag- 
er for the investment aim of a large Swiss 
b ank. “They never produced a really attrac- 
tive return.” 

Virtually all other financial markets feature 
a lively trade in short-term government paper, 
and Germany's abandonment of that market 
is an anomaly. 

“It's probably only a matter of time, maybe 
a year or a year and a half, before they react to 
international demand and either bring them 
back or introduce something similar," said 
Alexander Blaich, an analyst for Banque Na- 
tionals de Paris in Frankfurt. 

A Bundesbank spokesman, however, said 
the central bank currently had no intention or 
bringing Bubs back. The Bundesbank was 
allowed to issue as much as 25 billion DM in 
Bulis. 

Foreigners held as much as 80 percent of 
the Bulis at any one time; especially foreign 
central hanks, Bundesbank governor Johann- 
Wflhelm Gaddum told Reuters. 


After the Scandal, One Man’s War on 


Fokker 

Shares 

Plunge 

Company’s Loss 
Surprises Market 

Compiled br Our Staff From Dupauha 

AMSTERDAM — Fokker 
NV shares tumbled 5 percent 
Friday, after the aircraft maker 
reported a larger loss late 
Thursday than investors had 
expected. 

Fokker finished at 15.90 guil- 
ders ($9), down from 16.80, as 
investors registered their disap- 
proval of the company's 196 
million guilder loss for <he first 
half of the year, widened from 
127 million guilders in the first 
half of 1993. 

Fokker, which is 51 percent 
owned by Deutsche Aerospace 
AG, said its loss had been 
caused by soft demand for new 
aircraft and large but unspeci- 
fied provisions for cost-cutting 
operations. 

The company, which is cut- 
ting 20 percent of its work force 
this year, said the provision it 
took in the first half would car- 
ry it through most of 1995. 

“We estimate that the provi- 
sion will cariy us through the 
remainder of the current long 
and deep crisis" in the aero- 
space industry, a spokesman, 
Leo Steijn, said. 

Bat analysts suggested Deut- 
sche Aerospace, which is wag- 
ing its own battle with unprofi- 
tability, could decide to 
abandon its Dutch holding. 

“Fokker is draining money 
out of DASA," said Richard 
Brakeahoff, an analyst with 
Mees Pierson. “DASA must be 
quite shocked at the financial 
black hole Fokker has become.” 

As long as Fokker is not com- 
pletely owned by Deutsche 
Aerospace, the German compa- 

See FOKKER, page 8 


Salomon 


■i-r '• • * 






ECONOMIC SCENE 



bugh Line With CIS 


By Grigori Gerenstein. 

Knipfu-Ridder 

M OSCOW —This 
week’s negotia- 
tions between - 
Russia and the 
former Soviet republics of Ta- 
jikistan, Moldova and 
Ukraine demonstrated Mos- 
cow's tough new approach to 
financial aid for other 'mem- 
bers of the Commonwealth of 
Independent Slates. 

Now even the neediest CIS 
slates can no longer expect 
Russia to grant them loans 
without sufficient guarantees. 

Moscow also has begun de- 
manding the CIS states’ assets 
in payment of old debts for 
Russian fud. 

President Imoli Rakh- 
monov of Tajikistan returned 
from Moscow empty-handed 
Tuesday after Prime Minister 
Viktor S. Chernomyrdin of 
Russia refused Tajikistan’s re- 
quest for financial help. 

Then, on Wednesday, 
Prime Minister Andrei Sangh- 
di of Moldova came to Mos- 
cow hoping few a 200 billion 
ruble ($94 million) tine of 
credit to repay Moldova’s 
debt to Gasprom for natural- 
gas shipments. 

The best he could manage 
was 70 biltion rubles — and to 


gel that, he had to pledge as 
collateral 70 percent of the 
shares of 11 wine-bottling 
companies, 30 percent each of 
the shares of the television 
factory Alfa and the Scbet- 
tnash calculator factory and 
some, shares of Moldova's de- 
fense companies. 

Moldova’s debt to Gas- 
prom has reached. $250 mil- 
lion. far more than the new 


loan. So it was agreed that 
Russia would have free use of 
a Moldovan gas pipeline to 
export as much as 18 billion 
cubic meters of gas (630 bil- 
lion cubic feet) to Western 
Europe this year. 

The situation is much more 
serious with Ukraine, which 
owes Gasprom $1.6 billion 
and has no hope of a Russian 
loan to relieve the burden. 


Oil Will Flow to Hard Cash 

Kragfa-Ridder 

MOSCOW — Russia said Friday that although total o3 
production could fall below 300 nriffion metric tons in 1995, 
exports to countries outside the Commonwealth of Indepen- 
dent States should increase by 25 percent to 30 percent, 
according to the Interfax news agency. 

Q3 production has been declining at a rate of 40 to 50 
million tons a year, the ministry said. 

A source fro m the Fuel and Energy Ministry told Interfax 
that exports of crude oil outside the CIS would grow substan- 
tially^ following the elimination of quotas and licensing for 
oil exports on. Jan 1, 1995. 

Russia exported about 80 million tons of ml in 1993, and 
plans to export 85 to 87 million this year, according to the 
mndstiy. 

Ministry medalists said Russian oil refineries would re- 
ceive 130 million to 160 milli on tons of oil next year but need 
at least 220 miTfi on tons to supply Russia’s own needs. 
Ministry experts blamed customer nonpayment of energy 
bills for the continuing slump in the industry. 

Minbixy experts said Russian enterprises owed more than 
34 trillion rubles ($16 biltion) to the industry. 


Ukraine agreed Wednesday 
to repay 25 percent of the debt 
within three months. But leav- 
ing nothing to chance. Rem 
Vyakhirev, president of Gas- 
prom. had a closed meeting 
with President Leonid M. 
Kuchma of Ukraine. 

The results of that meeting 
have not been disclosed, but 
Gasprom officials in Moscow 
say Russia is pressing Ukraine 
to pay its gas debt with assets 
and property. 

Moscow also wants to use 
Ukraine’s gas storage facilities 
and export pipeline free of 
charge and insists on in- 
creased Ukrainian investment 
in the Russian gas industry. 

Whether Russia gets any of 
this remains to be seen, but it 
is clear that its stance toward 
Its CIS debtors is becoming 
tougher. 

So far this year, only Be- 
larus and have received loans 
— 150 billion rubles to Be- 
larus and 50 billion rubles to 
Kyrgyzstan — without having 
to offer collateral. 

For a loan of 80 biltion ru- 
bles, Tajikistan had to pledge 
50 percent of the shares of the 
Nurek hydroelectric power 
station. Uzbekistan bad to of- 
fer a metric ton of gold as 
collateral on another loan. 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


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source: Awfen 


JBy Floyd Norris 

New York Tima Sendee 

NEW YORK — John H. Gutfxeund, 
once one of the powerful men on Wall 
Street, has lost more than $5 million of his 
own money and probably will lose a lot 
more before he is finished with the Trea- 
sury bond bidding scandal that cost him 
his job as chairman and chief executive of 
Salomon Inc. 

In sharp contrast to the normal faLe of 
ousted chief executives, Mr. Gutfreund got 
ahnost nothing from Salomon after be left 
three years ago. Although the company 
announced that he had resigned — which 
he insists was the case — it now maintains 
he was fired and adds that he should have 
been fired for cause. As a result, Salomon 
decided to seize the stock options and 
restricted stock he had received 

Mr. Gutfreund, who will be 65 next 
month, has spent millions in legal fees 
trying to get Salomon to pay him. He was 
showed when a New York Stock Ex- 
change arbitration panel upheld Salomon. 

Last week he went to the New York 


courts in an effort to overturn the arbitra- 
tion decision. Unless he wins, Mr. Gut- 
freund could eventually be forced to pay a 
substantial amount to shareholders. 

In the investigations that followed the 
Salomon scandal, it became clear that Mr. 
Gutfreund did not approve of the illegal 
activities. 

Mr. Gutfreund, along with two other 
former senior Salomon executives, faces a 
$300 million suit filed on behalf of Salo- 
mon shareholders over the bidding scan- 
dal. The official position at Salomon is 
that Mr. Gutfreund mil have to settle that 
case on his own. 

Salomon executives and lawyers de- 
clined to be quoted, but privately they 
blamed Mr. Gutfreund for his own plight, 
saying he turned down a settlement offer 
of $8.6 million in late 1992. To Mr. Gut- 
freund, that was less than half the amount 
he was owed by Salomon through its retire- 
ment and option plans. 

For Mr. Gutfreund — once proclaimed 
the king of Wall Street by Business Week 
— the downfall began in 1991 when he was 


told by subordinates that Paul Mazer, then 
the head of government-bond trading, had 
admitted to making a false bid is the name 
of a customer. It was agreed that govern- 
ment officials should be told. 

Mr. Gutfreund did not act The false bid 
“looked to me to be a stupid act,” he 
recalled “He said be had never done it 
before and would never do it again.” 

But Mr. Mazer did it again. When the 
scandal broke, Mr. Gutfreund’s failure to 
notify became a huge error. 

The investigation by the Securities and 
Exchange Commission ended with a settle- 
men t in which Mr. Gutfreund paid 
$100,000 and was barred from serving as a 
chief executive of a brokerage firm. 

He was not banned from the industry, 
and the SEC penalty was for failure io 
supervise Mr. Mozer. Mr. Gutfreund felt 
vindicated but Salomon was not willing to 
pay him all the money he felt he was owed 

Secuxities-industiy arbitration panels do 
not state reasons. Mr. Gutfreund said that 
one reason for filing his suit was to try to 
force the arbitrators to explain. 


LEBANESE REPUBLIC 

COUNCIL FOR DEVELOPMENT AND RECONSTRUCTION 

TUNNEL HARET HREK - SAND’S 
INVITATION FOR TENDERING 

la the scope or Beirut Southern Suburbs UtffiUea Upgradings, and according to the Law No. 1246/ dated 12/7/1993, the 
Council for DevdopuMMt and RecocutmctSou Invites qnaBSed contractors for tendering for tfaenecntioB of HaretHmh- 
Saufs traael to dbdtarge the storm water In Beirut Southern Suburbs. 

The maht woria iwtndp the foflowtag : 

1- A T urnirl from HARET H KE IK to HORSH EL KATIE, 580m long approx^ with an inside circular diameter 3-6m. 

2- A Tnnnei from HORSH EL KATTL toward the sea with 965m long ippraz, and m inside circular diameter 3.6m. 

3- A rectangular Box culvert from the end of the Tnnnei to the sea with 530m Long approx-, and an internal Cross 
section with a width of 5m, and a depth of 3.2m. 

4- A rectangular Boximlvert from Hr El Abed to the entrance of the tmurel at Ham Hredi, 900m toagapproL, and an 
tnshie circular diameter of 3.6m. 

5- Special Complementary s tru ct ur es for the tunnel such as : the entrance of the tnnnei at Haref Hreflt, the Junction 
between Haret Hreflt tnsnel and Sand’s Tnand at Horsb El KatU, the transition section between the circular section 
of the Unmet and the rectangular box culverts, the sea outlet near the Sand's beach, and other structures. 

6- The Complementary Works includes : reconstruction of roads, sanitary sewers, storm water sewers, aide walks and 
others works restoring boa the execution of the project 

The tenderers should meet the cond i tions specified in the tender documents related to the project 
Some of these conditions are : 

A- The contractor tan executed daring the last 20 years for the Lebanese contractors, and dnring the last S years 
fbr the foreign contractors, systems of rntdergrouad urban ntiUtirs in the none importance of the current 
project wbfcfa fadndes trand woria not less than 3000 meter hng and not leu than 3 meter In diameter. 

B- The earth works and the box adverts executed by the contractor in the last 20 years for the Lebanese 
contractors, and the test 5 yean for tbe forriga contractors, should snunat fbr not less than twenty five raOUoa 
V A doOin Which Jndndes a single Ben culvert project fbr not less than One iriBon l? J5. doBais. 

In toe case of Joint vetonrea between different contractors, at least one ofthe contractors hi tiw group has to meet the 
eon d fflona Stated above In the paragraphs A and B, provided that aO the contractors wftfdn the John venture have executed 
worts daring Ow last 20 yean tor the Lebanese contractors, and daring the last five years for the foreign contractors, 
amounting Eh* not leas than five mffBon UA dollars. 

Tenders must be submitted inside two separate seated envelopes ; 

The first envelope shall contain the completed g w aMcsti on documents contained to the Tender Documents tor this 
purpose and a vj other supporting doctmwnts proving the trdudeaf and ffnamuf ability and experience of the 
Contractor. TV second envelope toaB contata the c og narrdal proposal. 

The Tender Committee shafl proceed, in a public session on Friday 14 October 1994, wtth the opening of the first 
envelope only and eshddbh toe ahfBfy and experience of the Contractors. The Committee shafl retain only fh ow 
Contractors who qualify to execute the Project and shafl return the T ender Documents of those Contractors who do 
aotqmEfr. 

The Tender Co m mi ttee shall then open the second envriopr of only those Contractors who have qaaiWcd pahhciyrta 
date «d tone to be aanoanced hi doe time. 

Contractors who wish to participate in this Tender are invited to coflect the relevant Tender Documents against a mm 
of UA doBar* (S 5000) In toe Form ofahanher's certified Cheque hi the name of toe Comicfl for Development and 
Reconstruction a* Che offices of CJJJL, during official woridng hour* as of Friday, August 12, 1994 at the foBowfng 
address; 

The Conncfl tor Development and Reconstruction 

TaHetAFSaray 

Brin* - Lebanon 

Tenders are to be snbmttted at the above address not later than 12:00 hoars noon Beirut local time « the offices of 
C-DJL oa Friday October 14,1994 


s 

I 

1 

1 

J 

8 

J 

r 

e 

s 

g 


he 

t 


l 










Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATORDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 20 ^ 1 , 1994 


** 


MARKET DIARY 


Stocks Can’t Shake 
High Rate Jitters 


GMftkdty Our Staff From Dapadies 

m NEW YORK — Stocks fin- 
ished mixed Friday as concern 
that higher interest rates would 
stymie corporate earnings off- 
set a rally in technology stocks 
sparked by International Busi- 
ness Machines' run to a 52- 
week high. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage slipped 032 point, to 


Bi 


1X3. Stocks 


3,755.1 1, but gaining issues out- 
numbered losing ones by an 1 1- 
to-9 ratio on the New York 
Stock Exchange. 

The price of the benchmark 
30-year Treasury bond edged 
up 2/32 paint, to 100 6/32, tak- 
ing the yield to 7.48 percent, 
down from 7.49 percent Thurs- 
day. But bond prices recovered 
from steeper losses, which 
helped underpin stock prices. 

IBM jumped 1% to 6814, a 52- 
week hig h, In active trading af- 
ter an analyst at S.G. Warburg 
raised his price target on the 
riD LyncJ 

itlook for IBM on 


out 


Tel6fonos de M&ico, which 
trades in American depositary 
receipts, was the most active 


Board stock, rising ft to 
in step with Mexico's Bolsa 
stock index before presidential 
elections in that country. 

In over-the-counter trading, 
Autodesk surged 8 M to 58 after 
it said strong overseas sales had 
produced hi gher-than -expected 
second-quarter earnings. The 
maker of computer designing 
and drafting products also said 
it would launch its Release 13 
AutoCAD program on time in 
October. 

Mississippi Chemical closed 
at 16 3/16 after the company’s 
initial public offering of 
5,080,000 shares was priced 
Thursday at 15 for sale by an 
underwriting group led by 
Wertheim Schroder. 

Snapple Beverage fell 1 1/16 
to 13 11/16. The company’s 
shares have lost 33 percent 
since Aug. 2, when it reported 
lower-than-expected second- 
quarter earnings. 

MGI Pharma, a biotechnolo- 
gy company, fell 2% to 7% after 
it said third-quarter revenue 
would be less than ocpected be- 
cause of an aggressive consum- 
er sampling program that has 
many of the company’s custom- 
ers using the product for free. 

(Bloomberg AP) 


Trade and Other Issues 
Still Nag U.S. Currency 


Compiled by Our Staff Fnm Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
fell against the Deutsche mark 
for a third straight day Friday 
amid worries about the trade 
deficit and concern that the cur- 
rency would not be supported 
by rising U.S. interest rates or 
falling German rates. 

Trading was directionless 
and uninspired. Dealers, how- 


Fo r a lgn Exchange 


ever, forecast a sharper attack 
on the dollar next week. 

The dollar finished at 1.5397 
DM, down from 15437 DM on 
Thursday, but held its own 
against the yen, ending at 98.68 
yen, up from 98.60 yen. 

“People are pretty bearish," 
said Hugh Walsh, a dealer at 
ING Capital Markets. “This is a 
bear market, without discus- 
sion,” said Marie Owens Thom- 
sen at Midland Global Markets. 

A Barclays Bank economist, 
Peter Luxton, said the market 
concentrated on U 5.- Japanese 
trade relationships a day after 
the announcement of a widen- 


ing of the trade deficit Avinash 
Persaud, an economist at J.P. 
Morgan, said the Japanese 
trade surplus probably would 
depress the dollar “at least until 
the start of 1995.” 

The dollar is also being un- 
dermined by expectations that 
U.S. interest rates will remain 
steady for some time. “There’s 
unlikely to be any further inter- 
est-rate support for several 
months,” said Tony Norfield, 
treasury economist at ABN 
Amro B ank. 


V* AmqmW %es* 


Aug 19 


The Dow 


s Daily dosings of the '-:. 

Dow Jones industrial average 

..Mr' - • 



* fit 

m 4 


JJ: A 


Dow Jones Averages 


Ooen Mali Law um Os*. 


Indus 37M_50J7a2.Z3 3741.51375S.il -OJJ 
Tram 159439 139462 153157 1382X0— .IK'S 
UIB 187.32 197-78 186J9 187.78 + 1.12 

Cm 1304J1 130134 1796,39 129954 — 2JJ7 


Standard A Poor’s Indexes 


Indus! rids 
rrronso 
Utilities 
•Finance 
BP 500 
BP 100 


IHT 


NYSE Most Actives 



VaL High 

Law 

Last 

On. 

TAUri 

*9791 65% 

6*'y 

65% 

-4k 

IBM 

tvx.zj 

66 

0% 

- 1^ 

6mBj 

rv.’rtrpl 

46’3 

479. 


20Cenlnd 

1 

12 

12% 

—3^ 

GnMota 

31317 4V% 

48% 

49'w 

— Mi 

G4a»D 

29156 30 

19V, 

20 

*** 

Fares 

27661 99% 

29% 

29% 

- 

Merck 

26816 3*'S 

33% 

34 

- l fm 

CacaO 

26410 *7% 

46% 

46% 

Re 

PoosiC 

25990 33% 

32% 

M'-V 

• J* 

WofcVicrt 

25733 2+'i 

24 

24V. 

* 

Owe Ir 

«S23 *7S, 

*5% 

47% 

_ 

jAJden 


33% 

34V. 


McDrtds 

23794 3 6% 

26% 

26V. 

... 

PJRNeb 

1 


6'6 

— 'fi 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


High Low dose Oto» 
54154 MU4 $4 191 + 087 


37553 37111 37144 —157 
157/41 1S&36 1S5J7 +0.12 
«0S 45XQ 450? Unch. 
4MJ7 461J1 44148 +051 
429 JO 426.19 42BJ1 + 80? 


NYSE Indexes 



High 

Low 

Last 

Chs. 

Cpmpesiw 

Industrials 

Tronso. 

UtlUv 

Pnance 

2560 

317.13 

24179 

210.07 

214*4 

2S4S3 

315*2 

240ft* 

2090 

213X2 

755X1 

316X4 

540.19 

20975 

21416 

+0X2 
+ 00 
—1X5 
+0*4 

+0j02 

NASDAQ Indexes 


Hfek 

Lew 

Last 

OHL 

Composite 

irtaushvas 

Banix 

Insurwxx 

Raance 

Tronso. 

743X8 

742X5 

777X7 

922.14 

952*2 

724X8 

74039 

74124 

775*4 

91L50 

9510 

719*6 

742*1 +0X4 
742X5 *10 
7740 —072 
920X2 —120 
951X6 -0X5 
722X7 -1.11 


AMEX Stock Index 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Ask 

ALUMINUM (Hm Onxfe) 


JBT. 


PrnhMS 

am u 


ponm BWiwUrtcton 


Scot 144050 1441-50 1*6150 14050 

COPPER CATHO WKUfl* 6«Se) 

2411-00 24^1. 

Rowfl 2407 JQ 2408X0 242100 2426M 

I « 57150 
KrUrt 588X0 582X0 592X0 59100 

NICKEL , , , 

Daflon par metric ton 
Scot 5485X0 5495X0 5771X0 578500 

RjTWBTd 5775X0 57B0X0 584000 5^0X0 

TIN 

Ddlora gar metric ton 

Sect 5145X0 5145X0 5225X0 535500 

SkCCsjeck/wbSradi) ai “° 

945X0 944X8 

Forward 942X6 944X0 949X0 97100 


Financial 


Dec 


JOB 


Dk 

Mar 

Jan 


ffigii Low Lotf CMl 
*4145 +9X53 44545 - 1-90 


Dow Jones Bond A 


20 Bones 
H Utilities 
to Industries 


Oaii 

tut 

93X0 

10178 


— 0X7 
-0X8 
-0X4 


NYSE Diary 



vdl Htah 

Low 

Last 

Dig. 


Oom 

Prev. 

Cisco 3 
MnsCnm 
MiCStf S 
SftaPBvs 
MCI 

InM 

Autcdk 

Orades 

107915 24 
51612 16% 
4655S 56 
42107 15 
37274 23 
28356 63% 
27077 5B^ 
23943 41% 

21% 

I9%t 

54% 

13% 

32% 

63 

55% 

39% 

22% 

lev* 

54% 

13"'.. 

23% 

4Ti, 

58‘ i 

40 y> 

— % 

— % 
-1%, 

-»w 

-8% 

- % 

Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

Total Issues 

New Highs 

New Laws 

1158 

970 

779 

2857 

36 

32 

890 

1299 

674 

2863 

43 

34 

Lotus 

ChrmSn 

21418 8% 

7% 

8 

-Vi 
— % 

AMEX Diary 

LODSs 

AST 

Seootto 

Amgen 

19737 24 
19037 17% 
I8IS4 26V. 
17736 56 

22 

16% 

24% 

0 

rrv„ 

17 

59% 

-Vi 
— % 
— % 
— % 

Advanced 

Declined 

Unoxrwd 

Total issues 

New Highs 

CtaM 

310 

253 

251 

814 

17 

Prev. 

246 

333 

244 

323 

14 

AMEX Most Actives 




CheySffs 

Amahl 

i+axCo 

Echo Bov 

XCLLfd 

Rovaioo 

PtnRSC 

dratf+l 

Saectvn 

GrevLne 

vet Mieh 

LOW 

Last 

Che. 

NASDAQ Diary 

7*85 7% 
6760 31% 
6303 11% 
340) 1% 
26*5 0.'i* 
2378 7% 
3228 12% 
70*0 2% 
1972 5% 

6% 

19 

11% 

VA. 

3W„ 

6% 

11% 

3% 

4% 

7V. 

204. 

11% 

l‘% 

4'% 

7 

12% 

2% 

-% 

-1% 

+ % 

-vT. 
-% 
-i% 
— % 

Advanced 

□edlnad 

Unchanood 

Total issues 

New Highs 

New Laws 

Ooee 

1690 

1461 

1878 

50BV 

82 

58 

Prev. 

1557 

1588 

1848 

5093 

105 

BZ 



Spot Commodities 

Market Seles 

Commodity 

Today 

Prev. 

NYSE 

Amex 

Nesdoe 

In million a, 

Today 

Close 

276*3 

14X4 

347.13 

Prev. 

coos. 

353X1 

18*2 

Tien 

Aluminum, lb 

Capper eleetrelytlc, R> 
iron FOB. ten 

Lead, Id 

Silver, trar as 

Steel (scrap 1, tan 

Tin, 1b 

Zinc lb 

0*63 

L14 

2130 

(ue 

5.165 

119X7 

15668 

0*666 

1.13 

213X0 

CL3B 

5.165 

779X7 

3X667 

0*652 


WOh LOW Oon O H M 3B 
1MONTH STERLING ILIFTO 
008 . 00 -gt* ot no pa 

9425 9417 

9142 9127 

9173 92X0 

92.15 91X4 

91X7 91X1 

91.27 91X1 

run 9093 

90X0 WJ5 
9463 9IL59 

90*8 9043 

9037 WX4 

9024 9022 

Est watonw: 51434 Open tot: V1714 
MAONTN EURODOLLARS IUFFB) 

SlraOUM-Pftof nopet 
Sap 940 940 940 UnCh. 

is B. S£ 

Bet vohicna: mOernn Int: SO. 


Jn 


9426 +0X0 

9138 +007 

9171 +0X7 

9115 +0X5 

970? +0J1 
9127 —0X2 

KM —0X4 

9078 -0XS 

90X1 —(LOS 
9047 —003 

90J6 — 8X3 
9025 —0X3 


3-MO NT H CUMNURI^U PFRJ 


0661 arfOten-Pfspf 
Sap 93X6 93X3 

Dec 9*07 9*J1 

Mir 9456 9449 

Jn 9419 9412 

Sag T1S* 9178 

Doc 9156 9150 

Mo- 91& 9X30 

Jem n+3 9109 

Sap 92X7 92X6 

Dec 9277 9273 

Mar 9244 9162 

Jn 9251 


9SX5 +8X1 
94X4 +0X1 


K5 


93X0 Urtav 
9152 Uncft- 


Unch. 

n.n unch. 


92X4 Unch. 
92J5 +0X1 


Est. volume: 57J7L 


SSShnJ 




vans. 


Unch 

+00 


VMONTH PIMRjMATIP] 


FFSariUkM-rts _. .... _ 
Dk 93J9 9309 

gr gs jft 

Sep 9259 9284 

Dec; rza •rue 

Mar 9154 9246 



92X8 9231 9228 —00 

Est. volume: 34X58. Open I nL: 1(0532 

LONG GILT (LIPFE) 

<9A000-Pti.32hdseriMpCt 
Sag 100-29 10046 100-10 —Ml 

Dec ItHHl 100X0 100X6 —M3 

Est. votomc: 34669. Open ML: 114407. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFPB 
DM 35*000- Ml ef HO M* 

Sag 9156 9130 9136 —037 

CMC 9051 9030 9054 —036 

esL volume: 101344 Open M3 171X54 
10-TEA R FRENCH GOV. BONOS (MATIPI 
gT*"-’® STN- 113X4 -00 

SE 1SS HS M =H 

jS NT. N.T. 1109* —020 

Est volume: uaXST.Oaen Int! 144571. 


Industrials 


hm low Lot sente cr*e 
GASOIL (IPS) 

33 . damn Mr Metric Nn-MsetWO ten 

sea 151X0 15000 15450 15450 —ITS 

Oct 15*35 15X50 15*30 15430 —235 

NOV 75730 15X75 15450 75450 —225 

Dec 75900 15830 15825 15473 — 1.73 

Joe 16030 15925 16023 16023 —230 


HHB Low Lost Settle OiW 
p«b uixo uojo uoso tan —as 

MOT 1589 1599 fflJ W-SS-HS 

A or NJT N.T. N.T. 15473 — 10. 

Mar 1S5J3 155.75 1XL7* 155JS -30 

JM N.T. N.T. N.T. 15536 -1JD 

EsL volume: 1104- Opwim. HUOO- • 


BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPB 


ILS. dsnan per bamMetaef U88 tamta 

Od 

16X9 

1635 

163S 

1638 —035 

MOV 

1677 

1630 

1636 

1630 —0X6 

Dec 

1677 

1637 

1677 

16X7 —0X1 

Jan 

16X7 

1633 

16X3 

1635 -0X1 

Feb 

1658 

1630 

16X0 

1631 —0X2 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

H.T. 

1629 -031 

Aw 

N.T. 

N.T. 

H.T. 

.1639 —031 

N.T. 

N-T. 

M.T. 

M3? — aw 

Jn 

N.T. 

N.T. 

NX 

TAJD -0.U 

Jlr 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1631 —0.J7 

An 

N.T. 

N.T. 

• N.T. 

MX2 —618 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

NX 

1633 — 0.17 


Est vnlumK 30279 . ppen Ini 131737 


Stock Indexes 


“MSS 


High Low. CtaM Chospe 


DOC 


139 pee 

32140 31B3J SEND +9X 

32149 32014 3222X +90 

N.T. NX 324ZX +90 

Est. volume: W78. Open M* 40051. 
CAC40CMATIF) . 

*S° ,P * r mSjOMOSXO 200730 —90 

S 3B37M IQ16X0 20X50 -940 

Ttmeo Ta man uriim —90 

DK 20450 204100 294X50 —90 

Mar ' 2D94D0 2BKPD 0720 —70 

EsL volume: ISXSS. Open lot; 42510. . 


So areas: mt», Attaadatad Press, 
London Inti Ftoendar Futures EKAobb 

tan ~ ' 


DtvMends 


Coawmr 


Per Amt Par nc 


CORRECTION . 
Cocnmwil ty BLSya , M 

ComtMno mcord dare. 

Us®— ; 

Correcting omaunt. 

RESUMED 

Ever gr ee n Bq> . 0 

INITIAL 

AiemsianGttOgp . - M 
SPECIAL 

Gaz Matrupttn g X6 

INCREASED 

cent Mhi Bcalw Q .12 

Fit Mercbonta Cp Q 2S 

MarYtond Fed Q ' .115 

REGULAR 

0 
X2 

s 

.13 


9- 15 W-11 

9-U 

10- 6 7M 


MO »-14 
Ml P-75 
9-15 M0 


P-1 P45 
P6 P20 
9-2 9-9 


HaJ 


Com Water Sva 
Donna) tyCorpw 


Fsf Bcp OH 
Far Flni Cs wis 
WHotirtSop lac 
FlrstbcnK III 
GabWH EQtYTT 
Gaz Matrapm 
KMnvrrl IwiAualc 
Uhtwy Inc 
Lonoa Drug Sira 
wnfl Am inc_ 


messus? & 


Inti 

PwSS^narCp 

Republic Bcp 


Rydar syaM’ 1 

eP, 


Ind 


PWroonCor^ 


Wtorttungton Ind 



U.S. /SHORT COYER 


Cisco’s Disappoint Market 

* 6194 TV AA 1\T/" Pf«m Systems It 


Late Thursday, Cisco said net income tor me - 

Its shares dosed a! WtoS, down fS cents, wrtwjU 
tninjnn shares that made it the most active over-the-counter issue. 

CompUSA Officer Quits After Loss 

M 

The i^^ysaid the reagnadoa had been 
the day after the company rqxxtcd a larger-than-expected loss o 
513.6 million for its fourth quarter. 

. /- MO* 1*. D— nimil 



CinpUSA^d 


James. Sdsner, senior 

Soros Bays Part of Colombian Bank 

» - ■ ixu 


BOGOTA (Reuters) —George Soros, the i wteniatioM 1 inves- 
tor, has takfm a 9 percent stake in Banco de Colombia SA’ ® ne 

aSSwgfcffSSkA • ty- bom 

concern that controls the bank, a Baucol smnce^d 
A source ax the Colombian brokerage that handled thetransac- 
tion on the Bogota stock market said the total pnee was aroimd 


» — ~ ^ didnotconf^^^™^^ 


BancoL a holding conmany -j — — — — - . . - 

bought75 pcrcmt oTbSot de Colombia from the Colombian 
government when the bank was privatized at the start os 1994. 

Unitrin Repurchase Plan Ch a llen ged 

WILMINGTON, Delaware (Bloomberg) — American GcnCTal 
Coro, said Friday it had filed suit against a takeover target, 
Unitrin Int, to block a stock repurchase program it called 

^American General, which has made a hostile $2.6 bfllfcm bid for 
Unitrin, also is seeking a court order that would force Unitrin to 
caster ne goti ati ons, provide American General with its nonpublic 
frngnrjai ariH refrain from further defensive measures. 

Unitrin announced Aug. 12 that it would expand a repurchase 
plan by 10 million shares, or more than 19 percent of its stock. 

Insurer Ordered toPay $119 Million 

-WOODLAND HILLS, California (Bloomberg) — Shares of 
20th Century Industries fell sharply Friday after the California 
Supreme Court reinstated a state order compeffing the insurer to 
pay more thwn SI 19 million in refunds. 

RicHfll, a 20th Century vice president, said the company had 
reserved $50.9 million to pay for the refunds. 

The ruling cleared the way for die state' to demand about $1 
billion in insurance refunds for consumers. . 

20th Century's stock fell $3,625, to $12175, in heavy trading. 


akVfln 




McDonnell to Work With Russia 

NEW YORK (Kztight-Ridder) — McDonnell Douglas Corp. 

said Friday it had signed two agreements with Russian aerospace 

organizations to advance the. development of future U.S. and 
Russian space programs. 




The Bundesbank’s decision 
to leave German interest rates 
unchanged after its meeting 
Thursday led investors to ex- 
pect the dollar will not gain 
support from any cut in Ger- 
man rates for at least another 
two weeks. 


FOKKER: Investors Boil Out of Unprofitable Dutch Airplane Maker 


The U.S. currency took a 
large tumble to 5.2745 French 
francs from 5.3005 francs 
Thursday, but barely lost to 
12955 Swiss francs from 12965 
francs. The pound was stable at 
$1.5490 from $1.5491. 

( Bloomberg, Reuters) 


Contained from Page 7 

ny could pull out and Folcker’s 
prospects would be very grim, 
said Michael Molenaar of the 
Robeco investment fund. 

The deterioration at Fokker 
shows that demand for regional 
jets is not yet strong enough to 
halt the price erosion fueled by 
years of overproduction, ana- 
lysts said. Airlines cautiously 
riding economic recovery are 
aiming to make the most effi- 
cient use of existing fleets. 


“I think DASA will stop 
pouring more money into Fok- 
ker if it doesn’t become profit- 
able by 1996,” said Corne 
Zandbergen at Bank Labou- 
chere. Fokker has predicted it 
would return to profit by 1996. 

Deutsche Aerospace has al- 
ready injected 1.0 billion guil- 
ders into Fokker since buying 
its bolding from the Dutch gov- 
ernment last year. 

But analysts said this had 
been largely washed away by a 


record loss of 460 million guil- 
ders since the beginning, of 
1993. 


Mr. Molenaar said Fokker 
was far from meeting its capital 
needs. It needs at least 4.0 bil- 
lion more guilders to develop a 
new aircraft type, the Fokker 
130 — a “stretched” version of 
its 100-seat Fokker 100 — he 
said. 

Fokker has already warned 
that it plans “more than one” 
claim on its shareholders to re- 


pay Deutsche Aerospace’s lat- 
est injection — a 600 million 
guilder subordinated loan. 

But Mr. Brakenhoff said most 
investors had already Jbad more 
than their fiU of problems at 
Fokker and refused even to con- 
sider investing in the oompany. 

Analysts said they' still hdp&t 
that orders for 35 aircraft 
booked by Fokker in die first 
half year could help revitalize it 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Delta and Virgin Delay Code-Sharing 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — Delta Air Lines Inc. and Virgin 
Atlantic Aiiways have indefinitely postponed, their scheduled 
Nov. 1 start of code-share services between Loudon and seven 
US. dries, ■■/... • 

They blamed the action on dday by the U.S. Department of 
Transportation in acting on the agreement. 


* i. v 


For the Record 


Ardi Communkations Group said it would acquire Becker 
Beeper Int, which operates in northern Illinois and Wisconsin, 
and Abraham Communications Inc. of -Florid* for $15 million in 
rash and 1.06 million Arch common shares. - (Bloomberg) 
An investor, Peter AAcr, was sentenced to more than two years 
in prison for exposing PaineWebber Group Inc. and four other 
brokerage houses to $2.9 million in losses. (Reuters) 


MYSE 


'"*1 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro HU 
ACF Holding 


Ahold 
Alan Nobel 
AMEV 


C5M 
D5M 
Ebavtor 


Gin-Brocade* 

HBG 


Huntar Douglas 
IHCCotand 
Intar Mueller 
Inn NMerbmJ 
KLM 
ICMP BT 
KPM 


Nadltovd 

OceGnmen 


PofctloM 

PN1IM 


RolInQ 


Royal Dutch 

SJork 

Unlimar 

VonO mmur m 

VNU 

Woilin/Klimtr 


607D MU0 
39-10 37.10 
99 99.10 
44 *460 
71440 217.J0 
7260 7170 
*1-70 4140 
690 49.90 
1420 1*4*0 
17101700 
150 160 
-W J5 
297 297 

2*10 MUD 
790 790 
8* 8*30 
400 400 
B10 810 
770 77.90 
520 530 
*90 *90 
51 500 
630 630 

770 770 

00 510 
570 570 
750 76 

1160 117 

5*0 5S 

119.10 1200 
0570 8560 

109.10 1090 
4820 *00 

1950 1970 
500 5230 
10860 1890 
118 118 


Brussels 


ag pm 

Ahima 

ArteO 

Borco 

BBC 

Bekoert 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

CKMT1II 



EtoctreM 

Electron na 

GIB 

GBL 

Guvoort 

Gtavertjui 


Krwflufbank 


200 
5830 

7270 7310 
125* r;: 

5690 5760 
3120 3200 
1*4* 1432 
410 470 
9650 9440 
5150 5230 
30*0 30*5 
6730 6810 
1*82 7*86 
T037S 10325 
310 3760 
532 526 

5150 51*0 

SocGen Banqii* 820 M00 

SocGflflMotan 2Z35 2255 

Safina 14225 74050 

Solvay 15550 15500 

TaSMBCferlO 10350 10500 

TroCJOM 10050 TOO 

UCB 25*00 25375 

Union Min fere 2560 jw 

Wagons LHS KA. TWO 

9 sesm&r :7snM 


Radical 


Frankfurt 


AEG 176.70 179 

AKbWSEL 3*3 3*0 

AllkPCc How 235* 2368 
Altana 67UO442J0 

Asks 995 1810 

BASF 32603260 

Bam 3690 369 

Bov. Hypo ban* 410 *11 
BwVeramsBk 429042MO 
BBC 7609 775 

BHF Bonk 382 382 

BMW S32084UO 

CocnmentXH* M 72* 
c u nt l ndilgl an 272 

^49S 
Df Mxudc Wfl MB 
DOOlfCM Burt 69*0 702 

Sbpo 39^ 

Mcruppi Sadi m m 
Harpener 3« M> 

Hankci 2* ™ 

Hrianam 

Harlan 23321150 

IWKA £7 3J* 

Kail 4.1. 739 139 

Ka«au 600 591 

mat g, J» 

UmtC 9*3 939 

LufftxattO 27402130 
MAN 4*8 

JSSfflT J J 

Muonai Ruedc 
K 47404810 

PWA 

RWE 4S2S0 



Helsinki 


Amer-YMvrna 178 l» 

emo-Gutzeir *00 *2.10 

Hdrtamakl 15* 155 

K.O.P. 100 7.90 

Kymmene 130 125 

Metro 16* 163 

Nukhl S2* 573 

Pohjdo 68 67 

Rapaia 103 9» 

Stockmann 2*0 236 




Hong Kong 

Bfe East Asia 3i.*o 310 
Cathay Pacific 120 1255 


Owing Kong 360 370 
IghTPw 38.90 39.10 


1425 1435 
24S5 2475 
1945 30 

200 20X0 


1210 1215 
140 160 
14X0 150 


anno Ugh! .. ... 

Dairy Farm Inn HAD 110 
Hang Lung D«v 1155 13-70 
Hana Sana Bank 5275 5325 
HanParaM Land 410 a 
HK Air Ena. 

HK China Oas 
HK EiadHc 

HK Land 
HK Ruoltv Tnw 
HSBC HoMIrtg* 
HKShanpHtb 

HK Telecomm 

HK Ferrv 

Hutch Whamooa 360 360 
Hyson Dev 2280 2115 

J online Math. 630 650 
Janflne Str HM 290 290 
KewMan Motor 150 1 SM 
Mandarin Ortart 100 1055 

Miramar HoW 200 200 
New World Dev XX 25X0 
SHK Props 5225 5325 
SJetux 11? 11B 

Swire POC A 60 67 

Tal Cheung Pros 110 7195 
TVE 4 

Wharf Hold 310 31.90 
Wing On Co Inti 11 20 11 JS 
WJnsor Ind. 15-75 11 JO 


Ftoma 

Forte 

GEC 

eg* Ace 
Glaxo 
Grand Mat 
GRE 
Guinness 
GUI 
Hanson 


Hllbjdown 
BC HkJos 


HSE 
1CI 
i nehcpgt 
Kingfisher 
Uxajro*J» 
LmW5ec 
Laporta 
Lasnra 

Legal Gen Grp 
Lloyds BwiK 
MorksSP 
ME PC 


NaTWest 
Ntnwsl Water 
Pearson 
PRO 
Plikington 
PowerGen 
Prudential 
Rank Org 
Reck Itt Col 
Red land 
Reed fntl 
Reuters 
RMCGrouo 
Ralls Rovce 
Rottimn (anil) 
Rcvtrt Seal 
RT2 

Saln5bwrv 

Scot Newcos 

Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

Shell 

skhe 

Smith Nephew 
SmlthKllne B 
Smith (WH) 
Sun Allhmee 
Tote & Lvlo 
Tescn 
Thorn EMI 
Tomkins 
TSB Group 
Unilever 
UM Biscuits 


war Loon 3W 

Wellcome 
wnutread 
WiniomsHdos 
WllttsCorroon 
E-T.MI 


Close Prev. 

1*6 

1*7 

3*2 

2*2 

103 

304 

£63 

£71 

6X5 

6X6 

4*3 

4X6 

1.91 

477 

a? 

5X2 

576 

157 

179 

t3 

7.40 

ax* 

ft 

478 

405 

S3 9 

5X9 

173 

171 

656 

4X3 

7.95 

802 

1X7 

157 

4X1 

453 

£50 

5X1 

4J6 

433 

40 

457 

5.01 

502 

471 

474 

5JU 

552 

632 

600 

7 

703 

1-95 

177 

57* 

577 

177 

3.16 

195 

402 

6*2 

600 

532 

£34 

613 

611 

SM 

£06 

9JO 

9X7 

2 

2 

4JJ2 

4 

4ft4 

199 

65* 

8X2 

438 

4*2 

5*8 

5*5 

432 

405 

1.18 

1.19 

£93 

£75 

7.19 

7.19 

£84 

602 

1X9 

1X9 

LSI 

451 

430 

477 

135 

332 

4*3 

4*3 

2*6 

2*6 

10X5 

10X7 

2X5 

2X6 

114 

2.10 

110 

11.17 

3*1 

143 

106 

207 

4001 

4106 

701 

701 

577 

171 

160 

3X8 

1X4 

1X1 


Johannesburg 


AECI 
Attach 
Anglo Amer 
Borlows 
Biwoor 
Buffeia 
De Beers 
Drtefontefn 
Gancor 
GFSA 
Harmony 
HWjveid Steel 
Kloof 

f Mdbank G rp 
Randfbnfeht 


Runlat 
SA Brew 


rows 
St Katana 
Sasd 

western Deed 


2425 2425 
178 118 

2570 255 

310 31 JS 
100 180 
AKKB UBI 

1070 112 

68 66J5 
13 12X5 
1260 126 
77 250 
322 32 

640 6205 
34 36 

500 *80 
1310 181 
mx 88 

440 NA 
31JS SJJ5 
189 108 


Prevtags: 


London 


Abbey Nod 
Allied Lyons 
ArtoWlgglra 


193 196 

6X3 SM 


AesIlrttFco® 


270 273 

247 2X3 


BAe 

Bank Scotland 

Barclays 

Bess 

BAT 

BET 

BlueCinde 
HOC Group 
Beats 
Bowatar 
BP 

Brit Airways 
BrttGas 
Brtt Steel 
ErftTetaeem 
BTR 

CaDtaWtre 

Cadbury Sefi 
Coraw 
CectaVlyeilP 
Cb mrn Unta n 
Ceurtautd* 
ECC GrouP„, 

EntartftOOOII 

Eut unin nei 


5-78 5X2 

5.12 5.1? 


S 

1.93 

5X5 

175 

4X3 

1 . 1 ? 

3X1 

7J7 

SM 


499 

1.96 

50 

SM 

426 

121 

3X6 

7J2 

50 


4X5 4X6 

410 407 


4ft* 410 
103 29* 


10 

386 

177 

447 

46V 

296 

20 


10 

383 

176 

457 


299 

20 


543 112 

138 SM 


389 
402 3J7 


308 310 


Madrid 


BBV 
Ben Central Hli 


CEPSA 1 

isssr 

Ercros 
Iberdrola 
Rmol 
Tabacsicra 
Tetafomca 


2640 26*0 
5160 5050 
1090 1090 
3290 3290 
2135 2100 
5730 5850 
178 169 

•35 859 

3990 4020 
32*0 X00 
1760 1775 


Milan 


Allecmza 15098 14900 

Anitoila 1360 13300 

AutastrtKtaPriV TMO IB* 
Bco AgrtaJlturo 27*5 OTO 
Ben Co muter I W 3B1 <C 5 
BcQltazLovara iomoiww 
B en Poo Havant 9300 9300 
Banco d! Rama 
BcsAmbrastano 
Bco Napoli rtsp 


Cradlta ttaJtato 
Enlehem Auo 
Perfln 
Flat spa 
Flnanz Agnind 
On m e ccon tco 
Fandtariaapa 
Generali Assie 
IFIL 

Itataementi 

ilotga 

MMIabanca 

Mon led Ugh 

Olivetti 

Pirelli Spa 

RAS 

Rtacscemc 


1 18*0 1790 
4110 3963 
1293 1280 
22300 22300 
2000 1990 
2910 3000 
17*0 1730 
6330 6210 
8000 7800 
1690 1710 
1IOOO I0SS 
39000 30250 
5800 5700 
11200 11X0 
4900 4883 
13570 13565 
1350 1333 

2210 2145 
2625 3615 
23*00 227DB 
09200 8965 


San Paata Torino 9340 TOO 


SIP 
SME 

SUiS?* 

stanaa 

Stef 

TPraAssfc 
M1BTEL : 10 
Pmian: n 


1 41 90 4115 
3610 3500 
2165 2115 
3620036250 
*935 4810 
25300 23000 


Montreal 


Alcm Aluminum 

S nk Montreal 
II Canada 
Bombardier B 
Comb lor 


Donahue A 
FCA mn 
MacMillan Bi 
Nall Bk Canada 
Power Coro. 
Pravigo 
Quebec Tel 
Ouebeeur A 
' ' B 


Qu ebyar l 

Tmdobi 




37 

33% 

AGA 

64 

61 

34% 

24% 

Aseo A 

603 

613 

46% 

*7^ 

Astro A 

16* 

163 

m 

WVte 

Altos Ccpen 

£9 WX0 

17V* 

17% 

Electrolux B 

373 

J7J 

6% 

6% 

Ericsson 

418 

418 

TV* 

7V, 

EsseJig-A 

100 

99 

13% 

13% 

Hardefcaonken 

92 

87 

4.15 

4 

Investor B 

1M 

164 

18% 

18% 1 

Norsk Hydro 

25625X50 

9% 

9% 

ProconhoAF 

120 

120 

19% 

19% 

SandvfkB 

118 

778 

5% 

6 

SCA-A 

110 

109 

19% 

18% 

5-E Bcnken 

<2.70 4200 

19% 

19% 

Skandia F 

109 

10B 

19 

19 

Skanska 

141 

138 

18% 

19 

SKF 

137 

139 

11% liv* ] 
: 1927.13 

Store 

Trelleborg BF 

450 4*1 

99X0 97X0 

Volvo BF 

145 

146 


Paris 


Accor 646 678 

Air UduWe 8M E39 

Alcatel AUtham *» 412 

Are 2520 257X0 

Bancolre (Ciol *750 *700 

BIC 1307 1300 

BNP ZJ0Z31X0 

Bouramr: 638 630 

Danone 822 34* 

Car r e l ou r 7283 2077 

CCF. 2870 207 

Conn 1170 118 

Charneum 1*10 1*1* 

aments Franc 3070305.10 
Club Med *14 *1420 

EM-Aoultalne *0470 406.90 

Euro Disney 10JO 10X5 

GeaEaux 533 536 

Hauas *61 *67.10 

Imettrf S*S 590 

Lafarge Caaoee ***704*9*0 
LesronsS 6280 6310 

Lvcn. Eaux 518 525 

Oreol (L'l 11*5 1155 

LVJVLH. 346 854 

MOlra-Hochetta 115.10 115A0 
MlcheUn B 2*7.90 2*6X0 

Mouflnee 1170 11640 

Paribas 351352*0 

Pechlnev Inti 156 157JQ 

Pemod-RJcord 3350 3330 

Peugeot 0*5 851 

Pinaull Print 935 925 

Radtotecteilejue 515 515 

Rh-PaulcriCA 13*0 135 

Raft St. Louli 1573 1570 


Close Prev 


Stockholm 


ClaeePrev. 


Taya la 
Yamal chi Sec 


2150 217D 
875 BIO 


e: k no. 

SSSHZr 


Toronto 


A+oer s yoer i dgn, 
Previous : 190272 


189412 


Amcor 

ANZ 

fP 


Sydney 


924 


19 JO 
1*7 
191 
423 
495 
190 
4X5 
1.10 
146 
11 

1.95 

2.95 


SdKjll 
Saint Gaba in 
S.EJL 

Ste General* 
Suei 

Thomson-CSF 

Total 

U-AJ*. 

Valeo 


976 923 

687 681 

5*0 5*7 

557 563 

399X0 25470 
161.90 142 

315X0 31410 
1*430 1*5*0 
289 2900 


Sag Paulo 


Banco do Brasil 21*0 21.90 

Banespa 9.95 478 

Brgdesco 
Brahma 
Cemlp 
Etatrabm 
Itaubanco 

UpM ... 

Poronapancma 150 15 

Prfroerm ussiujj* 


9 J0 470 
271 360 

107X9 107*9 

343 338 
285 251 
3590 350 


Souza Cruz 

Tetabras 

TotaiP 

Usiminas 

vale Rio Doce 

vort# 


6100 6X10 
0ti 490 
4ffl 434 
1*7 1*4 
1330 133 

135 IKK 
: 51382 


Singapore 

Cerabg* 7.90 a*o 

City Dev. 

DBS 

Fraser Neove 
Getting 
Golden Hone PI 

Haw ear 

Hume Industries 6X5 4X5 
Inctajpe ISO 50 

KePM< 

KL Kmong 
Lum Chans 
MaJow Banka 
OCBCfcretai 


70 70 
11.10 1I.1D 
170 170 
14*0 14*0 
191 2X7 
3-28 132 


OUB 

oueH 

Sembowcno 

Shangrtto 
Si me Darby 
SIA foreign 
iswcian 
snare Press ■ 
Sing StwraMp 


110 110 
406 402 
10 1*1 
9*5 9.95 
140 14» 
40 4*5 
8.10 80 
12 12 
5X5 5 

4X2 40 
130 130 
70 7*0 
17 1490 
4X3 428 


Bougamviile 
Coirs Myer 
Comalcc 
CPA 
CSR 

Faslers Bnrw 
Goodman Field 
IC1 Australia 
Mcgenan 

MIM 

Nat Aust Bank 
News Corp 
Nine Nefworfc 
N Broken Hill 
Poc Dunlap 
Pioneer inti 
Nmnay Poseidon 2.1* 
QCT Resources 10 
SantOT 193 

TNT 2X1 

Western Mining 70 
westooc Banking 437 
vrooasiee 477 


% 


9X7 

4C8 

190 

30 

0.93 

123 

495 

17*8 

470 

1.11 

10 

II 

10 

296 

lasi 

892 


3 St 
426 
303 


30 




Tokyo 

AkolEleetr 
AscW Chemical 
Asuhi Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 

Casta 

Dal Htaeon Print 1880 190 
Oohva Home i*» isia 
DaJwa Securities 1410 1620 


475 475 

BJ1 805 
120 1280 
15*0 1570 
1580 1610 
170 1760 
12*0 1270 


4560 *570 
3S3 2330 
3180 2200 
IBM 1100 
90S 1010 

875 tee 

1670 1730 
sin ago 

711 719 

763 773 
972 979 

3610 3640 
407 417 

1M0 »T0 
9*9 955 

737 74J 
7350 7*30 


5 -pore Telec omm 1*6 1*6 
Strolls Trading 3*2 3*8 

yg t*'*” 20 ^ 


Fanuc 
FuiiBvJc 
Full Photo 
Fulltsu 
Hitocni 
HitocMOeir 
Honda 
I to YDkcdo 
ItDCtKI 

Japan Airlines 
KaIJma 
Kansel Power 
Kowcsokt steel 

Kirin Brewery 
K om at s u 

xotota 

Kyocera 

Matsu Elec I nets 1720 1750 
Matsu Elec Wks 1100 1120 
MltsuMsM Bk 2610 2630 
MJtsuWsni Kaset 551 Sa2 
MWubW Etac 686 695 
Mits ubis hi Hev 799 814 

MJtsubishi Cora 1210 1240 
Mitsui and Co 872 833 
Mitsui Marine son ns 
Mftsukeshl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK insulators 

Nikko Scarifies 1200 1238 
Nippon KSDOkU 1010 1070 
Nlooan Oil 
Nippon Vni 
Nippon Yascn 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 

NTT 

Ojvmpas Ontkal 115D 1170 
2720 2800 

Rioch 
Sanya Etac 

■VNF9 F W 

ShlmoTu 
Stricastsu Cbem 

rent! tamo Bk 
wnltomo Cbem 
uml marine 
umfiamo Metal 
Totset Cora 
Totem Chem 
TDK 
iTeHIn 

Tokra Marine 

iTokra Elec Pw 

raaom Printing 1*90 1510 
Tprgy Ind. 770 778 

Toshiba 


100 W40 
15*0 1579 
110 1230 
1060 HBO 


752 736 

m 374 

653 6 42 

787 BID 
2280 2330 
87000 87900 


958 975 

573 573 
1790 1858 
726 726 
2C7C 21 W 
5900 9190 
1990 2010 
580 575 

950 9S2 


670 682 

1250 1210 
44W 4438 

.582 sn 

1240 1240 
3010 010 


764 76* 


AMUM Price 
AgnlcoEapta 
Air Ccnodo 
Alberto Eneroy 
Amer Barrlck 
BCE 

Bk Novo Scotia 

BCGOS 

BC Tetecomm 

Bramolea 

Brunswick 

CAE 

Ccmdev 

CISC 

Cdn Pacific Ltd 
Canadian Tin* a 
C antor 
Cora 

CCL Ind B 

Cirwple* 

Comtaco 


ISM T7fk 
1619 UH 
7VS 71o 
209% 20%. 
301% 


36 25* 
1*W 14H 
2Sk% 2 SVj 
vn S* 
10 10 
7Jfi 7Y% 
4V. 4X0 
31% 31 H 
229% 22% 
11% llki 
18 19 

3.95 183 
W% TVS 

5 . 5 

21 W 21% 
23Vj 23V 
10* tov 
22V a% 
00 0X6 
15V3 15% 
00 0X2 
405 4 

6% 6% 
17% 17% 

6 6 

« ft 
12% 12% 


U.S. FUTURES 


V% Ataodotad Pnm 


19 


csamsha 
D ctosco 
DytesA 

Echo Boy Mines 
ceu Ity Silver A 
FCA inti 
Fed InaA 
Fletcher Chall A 
?P! 

Centra 
Gutt Cda Res 

Hees inti _ 

Hemfo GM Mines 13% 13% 
HolHngor 12% 12% 

Horsha m 18% 19% 

Hudson-S Buy Cn 77% nv, 
Imasco 36% 36% 

Ineo 36% 36% 

I PL Energy 29% 2V% 
J onncc k 16% 16% 

Labott (John) 19% m% 
LobtawCoa 20% 0% 
Moeketuie 7Vi 7Vi 

Maana Inti A 52 52% 

Mame Leaf Fds 1T% 12% 
Maritime 25 25% 

Mark Res 9Vi 9Vi 

Moteon A 22 21% 

Noma Ind A 5 5 

Normxta Inc 26 2S% 

Noranda Forest U 11% 
Neraen Energy 17% 17 

Nlhern Telecom 47% *7% 
Novo Cora 13% 13 

Qsftawo Grouo A 18% 18% 
Ppaurtn a iso las 

Placer Dome a 

Pqco Petrataurn 8% 9 

PWA Cora 0X7 056 

Royrock 16% 16% 

genate anee Eny 23% 25% 
Rogers co mm B n ZPn 
Rotations tty, 76 

Royal Bank Cda 28% 28% 
Sceptre Res 
Scoff's Hasp 
Co 


Shell Canada A 
Sherrar Gordon 
5HLSV3temh» 
Southern 
Spot Aerospace 
Stake Inc a 
T oi tenon Em> 
Tee* B 

Thomson Cora 
TerDom Bat* 
Tamars 

Tro na g Mn Corp 
TrensCdaPtPt 
Triton Flni A 
Trimoc 

Unteorp Energy 




10 % life 
8% ■% 
42 42% 
7% 7% 

43% 43% 
12 12 
6% 6% 
16% 16% 
13% n% 
8 % 8 % 
29% 29% 
22% 22% 
15% 15% 
28% 29% 
23% 23% 
14% T«% 
W 17 
3X8 
15% 15% 
1X5 10 


Zurich 


AteemtiB 

Ahnutsse B new _ „ 

BBCfirwnBavB 1290 1215 
CMCeigyB 820 ea 


2S7 2£7 

M* 680 


cSH0Ufln|6B 


as 549 

3*7 350 

1510 ISIS 

*2° *22 

90S 920 

740 750 

408 410 
1184 1191 


Elektraw 
FllGtar B 
interdiscount B 
Jehnolt B 
lends Gvr R 
MoaeenpickB 

ftastte R 

Oerllk. Buefolo R 143 143 

gg-Hto* «RL» 

Safra NepuMic 
SmK 8 
Schindler B 
Sutter PC 

5urv*Uton» B 

SurtssBnkCoraB 376 37* 
Swiss tWnsur R S*1 SSl 
Swissair R 865 865 

UBS B 1091 1110 

Winterthur B 675 675 
ZurW ASS B 1265 708 

ZttSZiSF 


sm 5720 
TM 1U 
697 JOB 
7700 7800 
930 9*5 

naj 2ioj 


Seem 

Seeson 






Mgh 

Low Open 

High 

Loar 

Ckne 

ChO 

OpJnt 


Grains 




WHEAT 

(CBOTl IXMBummlmew-a 


IwM 



157% 

302 Sep 94 3*7% 

154 

147 

153% +U05 

12064 

3X8 

309 Dec 94 3*3% 

170% 

142% 

3XW* 

+ 005% 39X16 


3X7 Marta 3J2 


170% 

178% +006 

12X51 

368 

IMViMayta 3X6% 

ITT 

166% 

171 

+804*6 

1,199 

1*8 

XII Jm 95 3*5 

150 

3*3% 

150 

-004% 

I06W 

357V, 

155 Dec 95 



3X1% 

•004% 


Est.staes HA. Tlnra.sotes 






Tha'scpenirt *7X47 uo 560 





WHEA1 

OOOD MBburTWiman-i 




3X2% 

102i5Sep94 XS9+, 

1X4% 

157 

3X3% 

-005% 11020 

1/0 

XI7%OeC*l 165 

270% 

ur* 

168% *0M% 28158 


3X5 Marta 3X6% 
121 '•»Mav 95 3XT* 

172 


3X1% 

+ 805% 

7000 


162% 


162% 

• 006 

468 

0X7’h 

X 16% Jul H 3*5 

149 

144 

149 

+ 005% 

7T7 


129. Seota 



151 


6 


3X0’6Dec95 



3X0 

-005 

1 

Est. sates HA. Wvsotes 
TTs/s apm nt 






CORN 

OBGT1 &asten*n(m*»-*)fenptrl!uM 



192% 

X 4 SEP 94 2X1 

2X1% 

2X0% 

2X1 

+000% 31X51 

177 

117 Dec*. 173% 

2X4% 

122% 

1X1% 

D0tP>, mm 

7*7% 

2M ctarti IS 

Z3T4 

zjt-m 

ZS* 

+400% 26X75 

US 

2X2%May »S1» 

1X8% 

2X7% 

2X8% +800% 70X20 


2J6%Jul95 142% 

2*3% 

142 

2*7% 



UV.\ 

2X9 Sep 95 1*4% 

2*4% 

2*4% 

14« 

+800% 

821 

Z63 

2X5 '1 Dec 95 1*7% 

2*7% 

2*7 

2*7% 

*000% 

5X31 


157 Jul9* 



260 


73 

EsLsNes NA. Thu't.ltaeS 

1900 





TTw'sopwint 207X77 aft «6 







70S 

£71% Aug W 509 

604% 

198 

tor* +804% 

ini 

7089, 

5X0% Septa 5X8% 

403 

5X1 

502% 

*006% 14X21 

7X7% 

5X1 Nov 94 SJO 


£69 

£73% ■*»& 78598 

7.04 

s*0 Jonta 5J9’h 

5X7 

301% 

+O05 > 6 12*98 

7.15 

5X9 Mar 95 £36 


546% 

5X0% 

+005% 

4774 

7.85% 

£7r.,Mayta 191% 

£98% 

193% 

ita 

•805% 

£371 

706V, 

178%Julta £98 

603 

£98 

402 

+804% 

6X59 

£ta’6 

5X9 Aoeta 60Z 

602 

601 

<01 

♦0.06 

145 

£96 

£77. Sep 95 



408 

• 004 

V 


178% Nov 95 603% 

606% 

401% 

606 

-004% 

um 


Jdlta 



6X0 

-a®% 


Estsdes NA. Itu's.sotes 

21734 





TWsaPWIM 121XS7 Off 1566 






EflOTM 

T7K0Q 

ton 

177.W 

+1X0 

1*88 

21000 

170. 80 5ep9* 17500 

177 A3 

17880 

17690 

-> J0 184*2 

20750 

M9X0OO94 174X0 


17450 

175X0 

+8A 17X02 

20900 

170. 10 Dec 94 175.10 

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Compiled in- Oar Staff From tMspotdm 

FRANKFURT — Lufth- 
ansa AG said Friday it had re- 
turned to profit in the first half 


Klaus Roepke, a German equi- 
ties' analyst with James Capd & 
Co. “I flunk they have made 
many improvements on the cost 




of 1994 and was confident it side that are now paying off.” 
wouU be able to pay a dividend - But investors appeared unim- 
for the first tone m four years, pressed with the results, send- 
The airline said it earned 105 ing the airline's shares down to 
million Deutsche maxis ($68 214.80DM from 215:50. 
million) in the half, reversing a . Lufthansa sakMts flights 
"J® millicm DM m the -were up 7 5 percent from a year 

lyyjflrsr naff, helped by rising earlier, labor and -fuel costs 
passenger and freight traffic. were down, . andproductivity 
It said revenue from flight was up 11 £ percent after 3,728 

r ations rose 1 1 percent from jobs were eliminated. 

year-earlier period but did The airlines earning s were 
not give specific figures.- lifted' by surprisingly strong 

“These are the first positive growth in freight cargo, which 
results Lufthansa has reported analysts said was- another sign 

iLa ** - *- - _ _■ CivfwnaV f«V\t/oni 


uie year^arber period but did The airliners earnings were 
not give specific figures.- lifted' by surprisingly strong 

“These are the first positive growth in freight cargo, which 
results Lufthansa has reported analysts said was ■ another sign 
for the first six months since of Europe's economic recovery. 
1989,” Germany*® national air- Lufthansa’s freight tonnage 
line said. rose nearly 18 percent in the 

The company has not paid a *coad quarter, to 664,000 met- 
dividend on its preferred shares ric <****(>**% said. Car- 

smcc 1990 and on its ordinary S° 58,68 rose nearly 11 percent 
shares sinpe 1989 a .through June. 

The airline said its promising Passengers 

fust half had led it to revis? CUTU ^ hy Lu { th ^ <^. ou P 


Bloomberg Business News 

FRANKFURT — From the window 
of his plainly furnished high-rise offa*. 
Martin KohBiaussen, chief executive of 
Commerzbank AG, can see the skyscrap- 
ers belonging to his bigger rivals, Deut- 
sche Bank AG and Dresdner Bank AG. 

Mr. KoMhaussan is unperturbed. 

“We’re only interested in profii-orient- 
ed growth,” he said. “We don’t mind if 
we're the third or fourth-teggest bank." 

And that’s fortunate, because over the 
past few years a third competitor, Mu- 
nich-based Bayerisehe Verriosbank AG, 
has ousted Commerzbank from third 
place among Germany’s largest commer- 
cial banks. 

But investors and analysts are not es- 
pecially concerned, because profit, not 
volume, has been the focus of Mr. Kohl- 
haussen’s strategy for Commerzbank 
since he took the helm in May 1991. 

“Kohlhaussen really deserves the 
credit for what has been quite an im- 
provement in underlying profitability,” 
said Bryan Crosslcy, analyst at Hoare 
Govett Ltd. in London. 


Mr. Kohlhaussen has confounded the 
skeptics who said he was the wrong man 
to succeed Walter Seipp, his brash, ex- 
troverted predecessor. 

His career track has been unconven- 
tional 

The chid 1 executives of most big Ger- 
man banks rose through the ranks. But 
Mr. Kohlhaussen is a veritable job-hop- 
per, coming to Commerzbank after 
working at westdeutsche Landesbank. 
GirazcntraJe AG, Lloyds Bank PLC and 
Deutsche Bank. 

Mr. Kohlhaussen, 58, also is the only 
head of a big German bank who has 
lived and worked abroad, in Tokyo and 
New York, and he keeps an unusually 
low profile for such a powerful figure. 

“You hear a lot about Hfimar Kopper 
and other chief executives,” Mr. Crosslcy 
said. “Kohlhaussen is a bit of a dark 
horse. He’s only ever quoted in specific 
references to Commerzbank.” 

Last year, Commerzbank, which has 
assets of 285.4 billion Deutsche marks 
($184 billion), posted net profit of 586.4 
million DM, a 40 perc e nt increase from 


the adjusted figure for 1992. Bayerisehe 
Ver rin shank , by comparison, poked net 
of 5843 milli on DM in 1993 on assets of 
2893 billion DM. 

As with other Gennan banks, earnings 
were lifted by income from own-account 
trading, which soared in buoyant stock 
and band markets last year. Bui analysts 
saw more fundamental improvement. 

“Risk provisions came down, and 
profits moved ahead quite a lot,” said 
lan McEwan, an analyst at Merrill 
Lynch Europe in London. 

But Commerzbank’s half-year results 
disappointed analysts. The bank said op- 
erating profit, which is before taxes but 
includes risk provisions and trading in- 
come, fell 23 percent. 

Analysts said they expected tire full 
year to be betteT. 

“Commerzbank often performs better 
in the second half than the first,” said 
Thomas Fergande, an analyst at Vereins 
& Westbank AG in Hamburg, a unit of 
Bayerisehe Veremsbank. “I could imagine 
an improvement in the next six months.” 



Sources: Reuters, A 




upward its predictions for- the 
whole year. 

“At the start of the year, we 
were talking of breaking even,” 
the' airline said. “In May, the 
prospect of r eport in g positive 


operaring results emerged into 
the realm of possibility ." 

*T think Lufthansa is the big- 
gest turnaround story in the air- 
line industry right now,” said 


rose. 3 percent; to 17.6 million. STOCKHOLM — The op- 
Thc parent carrier, Lufthansa position Social Democratic 
AG, reported a 03 percent in- Party said Friday it would cut 
crease, to 14 million passengers. 61 billion kronor (S 8 bfflion) 
The companv said it had ab- irto to ajunuy’s budget over 
sorbed fTprice erosion in air tonenf oy yro tf itjyon to 
traffic in reomt years by tightly demons schrtpled for SepL l 8 . 
controlling costs and by taking . °fP”» a mjm jfi dec- 

other, unverified “steps inthe 

market and product” markets, winch had been ouBet- 

. ... ed by rumors about the manifes- 

( Bloomberg, AFX, Reuters) to au week. The dollar weakened 


Sweden Relieved at Opposition’s Budget very briefly; 

• French industrial pro 

Compiled by fa Staff Fnm txrpatcha w 7.6814 krona from 7.8431, of the manifesto were leaked agree on any concrete measures —..—* 1 , as demand fell 

STOCKHOLM — The op- and most stock prices rose. throughout the day. to curb the state debt, mostly ^ _ 

oosition Social Democratic n™ cv But the opposition plan is not because of preparations for the • Britain’s trade denci 

Party sSd^Shry ftwonld cut likely to ha^Wtended calm- general elections. Union was smaller than 

Slbfflion kronor ($8 billion) ing effect cm financial markets. The Social Democrats plan m July. 

From the cnuntrv’a budm-t over L^5.95, wMethe SX1 said Darren Cullen, a Scandina- calls for budget cuts of 33.6 • Norsk Hydro AS sai 


ftom the country’s budget over ^ dosed ^ 937 OT o.63 

thenextfomyMisriitwraAe ^c^at^^ButtheAf- 
de^ums scheduled for Sept 1 8. index shooed 0.49 


VE . At ™ analyst with Salomon 
ons scheduled for Sept. 1 8. Brothers Inc. 

dec- “2*frJSfS 1 d * ped 049 The Social Democrats are 

platform relieved frnmrial P® 0 ™ 1 * 10 not doing enough to show fi- 

ets, which had been buffet- Although the Social Demo- nandal markets that the prob- 
rumors about the manifes- crats released their platform af- lem is bring addressed/’ he 
week The dollar weakened ter the markets closed, details said. “This means the turbu- 
lence in bonds could continue 

Up tO tfaff dCCtKin.” 

Sweden’s budget deficit has 

ri__ /*». • ¥TT» m FI I/* been the key political issue since 

Profit m First Half a 

largest insurer, Skandia AB, said 
company and than 90,000 cars this year, compared he would boycott Swedish bonds 

leral Motors with an earlier prediction of 88,000. mug politidans brought debt 

n 1990. In the Saab's break-even level is 83,000 vehi- under control 

189 million cles, Mr. Salzer said. The state debt currently 

percent Sales at the Scania truck division rose stands at about 137 trillion 

tafying," said 35 percent, to 11X12 billion kronor, kronor, and the budget deficit 

nobfle’s vice boosted by a 10 percent rise in the Euro- for the year to June 30, 1995 is 

. “This shows Pea* tnick maiket so far this year. perfected at 160 billion kronor, 
t we made is Scania predicts that between 130,000 The bond boycott caused a 

and 135,000 heavy trucks will be sold in plunge in government bonds 
ie carmaker’s Western Europe this year, compared and the krona. Swedish poll ti- 
ro more than ’with 114,000 last year. dans have since been unable to 


i j Ji nw ov iim iv n*i a 

percent, to 1,894.12. 


Soab-Scama Returned to Profit in First Half 


Ca/fUtd try Our Seff From Dhpmtha 

STOCKHOLM — Saab-Scania AB 
has returned to profitability, the Swedish 
automobile and aircraft maker an- 
nounced Friday. ' 

The company said it had net profit of 
819 nrifiion kronor ($104 million) in the 
first half of this year, reversing a loss of 
'271 milKo n kronor in the first half of 
1993. 

Saab predicted it would have a profit 
far therall year as wriL Last year, it had 
a loss of 531 nriQion kronor. . - 

Group-sales rose 22peroent inihe first 
six months, to 143 bflhcai kronor. 


it became an independent company and 
die LLS. automaker General Motors 
Cap. acquired 50 percent in 1990. In the 
second quarter, it earned 189 million 
kronor, as sales rose 26 percent 

“This is extremely gratifying,” said 
Peter Salzer, Saab Automobile's vice 
president for public affairs. “This shows 
that the very painful effort we made is 
paying off.” -. 

In the past four years, the carmaker’s 
work force has been cat by more than 
half, to just under 8,000. The company 
also cut the number of employee work- 
ing hours needed to buila a car from 


The comp an y’s Saab Automobile AB more than 100 in 1990 to 45 in 1993. 
unit posted its first qoaxtedy profit since Saab predicts it will produce more 


thaw 90,000 cars this year, compared 
with an earlier prediction of 88 , 000 . 
Saab's break-even level is 83,000 vehi- 
cles, Mr. Salzer said. 

Sales at the Scania truck division rose 
35 percent, to 11X12 billion kronor, 
boosted by a 10 percent rise in the Euro- 
pean truck maiket so far this year. 

Scum predicts that between 130,000 
and 135,000 heavy trades will be sold in 
Western Europe this year, compared 
with 114,000 last year. 

. Truck demand in Brazil this year has 
risen 25 percent, and in Argentina it has 
increased 80 percent. Demand also is 
rising in Southeast Asia and Australia. 

(Bloomberg, AFX, Reuters, AFP) 


calls for budget cuts of 33.6 
billion kronor, mostly by elimi- 
nating some welfare benefits, 
and 12.4 billion kronor of tax 
increases. 

“The savings total is good 
news,” Mr. Cullen said. “But 
it’s bad news that it's spread out 
over four years." 

The largest measure in the 
savings plan was a new means 
of financing health insurance, 
projected to increase revenue 
by 15.0 billion kronor. 

The Social Democrats pro- 
posed saving 9 billion kronor by 
increasing payments such as 


• French industrial production fell in June after five months of 
growth, as demand fell for cars and consumer goods. 

■ Britain’s trade deficit with countries outside the European 
Union was smaller than expected, at £418 milli on ($647 million), 
in July. 

• Norsk Hydro AS said it reached an outline agreement with 
Texaco Inc. to merge oil-products marketing companies in Den- 
mark and Norway. 

• Ford-Wake AG, a unit of Ford Motor Ql, said pretax profit 
jumped 158 percent, to 250 million Deutsche marks ($161.3 
million), in the first six months of the year from 97 million DM a 
year earlier. Sales were up 1 12 percent. 

• Compagpie G 6 o£rale des Earn SA said sales rose to 38.1 billion 
French francs ($7 billion) in the second quarter from 372 billion 
francs a year earlier. First-half sales rose 2.3 percent. 

• E u rot u nnel SA sales were 19.38 million French francs in the 
second quarter, the company said The figures relate to revenue 
since the partial start of commercial operations cm May 16. 

• Banco Santander SA confirmed reports in the financial daily 
Expansion that it had sold a 1.47 percent stake in Banco EspafM 
de Cr&fito SA. It did not identify the buyer. 


as is now the case. 

Once the budget deficit falls 
below 100 billion kronor, the 
payments would rise to 80 per- 
cent of inflation. 

(Bloomberg Reuters, AFX) 


• Swiss producer prices rose 0.1 percent in July from June, while 
the import price index rose 0.4 percent. 

• West German industry in June was operating at 82.3 percent of 
capacity, compared with 80.3 percent in March. 

AFP. Rnaen. Knigni-Ridekr. AFX 


KOREA: Foreign Automakers Face Hidden and Not- So-Hidden Barriers 


rmi 


Matt Lam Stock 


Pfy YU PE WOS Hah LamLttatafq 


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the tiostnp on WaH Street and do not reflect 
tate trades elsewhere. Vto The Associated Press 


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Continued from Pte! 7 eliminate restrictions on floor 

, . , .. space at sales outlets and to 
.automobiles in 1993. including permit Western companies lb 
conunermal vehicles; exports advertise their products on tele- 
totaled 639,000, a 40 percent viston during prime time, 
increase from the year before. The South Korean govem- 
With an expKtol jump of ment also took the unusual step 
15.6 percent in 1994, total pro of publicly stating that citizens 
duebon will rise U) 2.37 million w jio buy foreign automobiles 
units makin g South Korea s ^vill not be singled out for tax 
auto industry the world’s fifth au dits — something alleged by 
biggest, trailing only the United f ore ign car companies but de- 
States, Japan, Germany and nied by the government. 
France. . ... . , ... 


with the situation, preferring in- 
stead to have a group of inde- 
pendent dealers that would al- 
low the carmakers to conserve . 

their cash and energies for man- 81 s 5 lou . s consideration, but 
SacSg, ratha^an market- decision coidd take two or 
££ But having invested in the “J .<*^num, 

nJLnrtQ wluciant in ^ Sun saidm 80 mu ?' 


up a similar network in Japan in 
1981. 


networks, they are reluctant to 


cent of the Korean companyTto kwmg ton to « up their °wn 


Analyse say^the South Kore- 


an makers — led by Hyundai were dismissed as inade- 

Motor Co. Kia Motors Corp. ««*■ L 

eori rvi-eurwv Koreans shouldu i buy imports 


and Daewoo Corp- — plan to 
invest billions of dollars to ex- 


Koreans shouldn’t buy imports 
has been reinforced over the 


pand output to 4 million units ycax l m the Korean psyche and 
by 2000 and to develop overseas “ 50 * e *?**“* 

dealer networks. * hal ***** a ^ar 

In response to pressure from doesn t put one at nsk is going 
foreign automakers, who hope ta ^ e a few to sm ^ 
to have 5 percent of the market ™- ^ erome sai °- 
by 2000, Seoul announced a The bigger problem is that 
plan in June to improve West- even if South Korean consum- 
ers companies' access. Japa- ers wanted to buy foreign cars, 
nese car companies, however, there would be few opportuni- 
whose exports of components ties for them to do so now. 
and licensing fees make up the Western carmakers distribute 
biggest share of Seoul's wide their vehicles mostly through 


work to market Ford vehicles, 
including the subcompact Fes- 
tiva built by Kia. Ford, which 
owns 25 percent of Mazda, set 


“Foreign car companies 
would be smart to tie up with 
the chaebol to set up dealer net- 
works,” he added. 


trade deficit with Tokyo, will indc 
continue to be banned, most Sou' 
likely for several years. are : 


South Korea these companies 
are small, each with fewer than 


Seoul agreed to cut the tariff 20 outlets nationwide. 


on foreign autos to 8 per cam 
from 10 percent and to abolish 
a 15 percent tax on luxury cars 


South Korea’s three his car 
urmanies, which operate hun- 
reds of showrooms across the . 


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ENTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, AUGUST 20 - 21, 1994 


Page 11 


Stocks Fall 
♦In India on 
Reliance’s 
Sales Data 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dkspairbes 

NEW DELHI' — Reliance 
Industries Ltd. reported a 25 
percent increase Friday in firsl- 
quarter sales, but tbe result fell 
short of market expectations 
and generally ..pulled down 
slock prices. 

The Bombay Sensitivity In- 
dex, which tracks 30 major 
slocks on the country’s largest 
exchange. Tell 65.55 points to 
close at 4,468.78. 

Reliance, a petrochemical 
and textiles concent that is In- 
dia's largest private-sector com- 
pany, said sales for the period 
had increased to $532 million 
from S425 million. 

Trading was lighter than usu- 
al ahead of a long holiday week- 
end. India's stock markets will 
be closed Monday and Tues- 
day. 

Reliance closed down 6.25 
rupees (2Q cents) at 417.5 on the 
Bombay market. 

Analysts, however, said all of 
Reliance's divisions, particular- 
ly petrochemicals, were strong. 
£ They said another facin' pull- 
ing down stock prices was that 
institutions were selling shares 
to raise money for a rash of 
initial public offerings sched- 
uled for September, and with 
few investors in the market, 
some sellers had to accept lower 
prices. 

The number of new issues 
coining on the Indian market so 
far is 21 percent more than in 
the comparable period last 
year. 

■ Taiwan Share Prices Rise 

The Taiwan market index 
moved up 2.7 percent, while 
most other Asian markets went 
in the other direction, Reuters 
reported from Hong Kong: 

Taiwan's rise was led by the 
financial sector as liquidity in 
the banking system loosened, 
brokers said. 

The Weighted Price Index 
ended 18022 points higher, at 
6,766.38, in heavy trading. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Investors Like Samsung’s Outlook 


' Reuters 

SEOUL — Samsung Electronics Co. is 
..confident a semiconductor sales boom 
that helped send its first-half profit soar- 
ing this year wH continue. Investors are 
eager to share the company’s prospects. 

A spokesman from Samsung Electron- 
ics, South Korea's largest electronics 
maker, said Friday tbe company had 
revised its sales projection for the full 
year to. 11 trillion won (SI 3.7 billion). 

That is up from an earlier forecast of 
10 trillion won and from last year's 8.15 
trilb on won.. -• 

“For now, how much the projection 
will be upwardly, readjusted appears al- 
most meaningless. Samsung's sales will 
be far higher than what the company 
says," Kim Dt-hwan, an analyst at Hyun- 
dai Securities Co^ said. 

“I expect Samsung’s net profit for the 
whole of this year to be around 570 


billion won." be said. In 1993 it was 
154.6 bDlion won. 

Brokers said investor confidence in the 
company was reflected in a sharp gain in 
its share price since it released its Janu- 
ary-.! une results last week. 

The share price soared 3,000 won to a 
record 107,400 in Seoul on Friday, con- 
tinuing a weekloog rally. 

‘This rally will continue for a while, 
and many investors expect Samsung to 
reach 150,000 won soon." said a Seoul 
securities broker. 

Samsung’s net profit leaped to 28 5.64 
billion won in the six months from 56.2 
billion won a year earlier. Its six-month 
sales totaled 5.1 trillion won, compared 
with 3.77 trillion won. 

The company spokesman, Seo Jong 
Gook, said booming sales of semicon- 
ductors and other high value-added 
products were behind the profit jump, as 


sales rose a more modest 35 percent. 

Mr. Seo said Samsung's business for 
the second half of 1994 would continue 
to be led by rising semiconductor sales, 
which are expected to account for 35 
percent of total sales this year, compared 
with 31.8 percent last year. 

‘‘We have steadily increased invest- 
ment both in facilities and research," Mr. 
Seo said, adding that this year's invest- 
ment would total 2.23 trillion won after 
last year’s 2.10 trillion won. 

Hyundai Securities’ Mr. Kim said 
Samsung’s memory chip exports benefit- 
ed trom a high yen. which caused us 
international chip prices to rise. 

The South Korean currency has lost 
1 12 percent of its value against the yen 
this year. Tbe won’s depredation against 
the yen boosts the competitiveness of 
South Korean products in export markets. 


Hong Kong Rents 
Poised to Drop, 
Morgan UnitSays 

Bloomberg Busmen News 

HONG KONG The sky- 
high office prices to Hong Kong 
are likely to fall 45 percent over 
the next three years, and apart- 
ment rentals should decline 20 
percent. Morgan Stanley Aria 
said. 

Peter Churchouse, managing 
director of the Morgan Stanley 
Group Inc. unit, said the colo- 
ny's officeMxiarkeL cycle was 
close to a peak, with prices hav- 
ing risen 225 percent since 

. Based on that, he recom- 
mended investors switch from 
Hong Kong office investment 
companies to real-estate devel- 
opers. which focus on housing 
for salt. 

Mr. Churchouse said there 
had been a slowdown in inqui- 
ries by companies seeking office 
space and resistance to the high 
■rents by prospective tenants. 

Also on Friday, the Hong 
Kong Association of Banks de- 
rided to raise the interest rates 
that local banks pay on deposits 
by a half a percentage point, a 
move that caused most major 
banks to raise their prime lend- 
ing rates. 


Papua Log Deal Casts Wide Shadow 


gave 

Mai 


Reuters 

KUALA LUMPUR — A 
i/ernment-run foundation in 
lalaysia's Sabah state has 
asked Construction & Supplies 
House Bhd. to help run a timber 
concession in Papua New Guin- 
ea. a source close to the deal 
said Friday. 

The proposal could provide 
an important due to the direc- 
tion of limber policy in re- 
source-rich Sabah itself now 
that Prime Minister Mahathir 
bin Mohamad's National Front 
has gained control there. 

This marks the latest in a 
series of sometimes controver- 
sial moves by Southeast Asian 
timber companies to extend op- 
erations. In recent years, large 
logging companies — mostly 
from Malaysia, South Korea 
and Indonesia — have gained 
large forest concessions in the 
Solomon Islands, Papua New 
Guinea and Vanuatu. 

The source said the founda- 
tion received a license to log the 
700.000- acre (283.500-hectare) 
site in 1992 but had some prob- 
lems on its terms that Construc- 
tion & Supplies could eliminate. 
The company would operate 
the concession, provide work- 
ing capital and pay a 5 percent 
royalty to the foundation. 


The source said the compa- 
ny's involvement was a sijpi of a 
new timber policy emerging in 
Sabah. The source estimated 
that the concession would yield 
300,000 cubic meters (1 million 
cubic feet) of logs a year and 
said Construction & Supplies 
would stand to make 60 million 
ringgit ($23 million) in pretax 
profit annually. 

<~nn«trurttnn A Suonlies wcuare - ‘ ne tounuauon and 

shares rose 20 cents lo 9 ringgi, “^tS’S^gS toldS 


Joseph Ambrose Lee, who has 
arranged to have the Indone- 
sian timber tycoon Prajogo 
Pangesoi take over the holding 
company. 

Mr. Lee was a staunch sup- 
porter of Mr. Mahathir’s Na- 
tional Front. The Sabah Foun- 
dation was set up in 1967 to put 
profit from logging into social 
welfare. The foundation and 


Friday in heavy turnover before 
trading was suspended at the 
company’s request pending an 
announcement, expected Mon- 
day. 

Construction & Supplies is 
controlled by a Sabah laywer. 


timber concessions in Sabah. 

Timber analysts said Mr. 
Prajogp appeared to be using 
Construction & Supplies as his 
vehicle for expansion outside 
Indonesia. 


Profits Skid 
At Pioneer 
Electronic 

Compiled h Our Staff Fnm Dijpaidm 

TOKYO — Pioneer Bee- 
ironic Corp- stud Friday that 
consolidated pretax profit for 
rhe second quarter fell by 44 
percent, to 225 billion yen 
(S 22. 5 million), compared with 
the 1993 quarter. 

The maker of audio and vid- 
eo home entertainment prod- 
ucts thus joined the ranks of 
Japanese electronics makers 
that have seen profits slashed 
by the strong yen and the reluc- 
tance of the world's consumers 
to part with their cash. 

Sales Tell 6.6 percent, to 
1 16.35 billion yen. 

“This is a terrible set of re- 
sults." said Masaaki Sono. a 
Pioneer senior managing direc- 
tor and the company's chief fi- 
nancial officer. 

Pioneer's profit has fallen 
from a peak of 33.1 billion yen 
in the year that ended in March 
1992 to only 1.65 billion yen 
last year. 

Pioneer shares closed at 
2.720. down 80 yen. 

For the year ending in March 
1995, the "company forecasts a 
profit of 5.2 billion yen. Mr. 
Sono said there was no reason 
at present to change the fore- 
cast. but analysts said the target 
could be difficult to reach. 

"Pioneer needs to embark on 
a much more severe restructur- 
ing in order to meet its earnings 
forecasts." Hitoshi Kuriyama, 
industry analyst at CS First_ 
Boston (Japan) Ltd., said. 

(Bloomberg, Reuters, AFXf 


South Korea Toughens Bank Rules 


Agent* France- Press e 

SEOUL — Commercial banks in South 
Korea will have to disclose large-scale bad 
loans and financial "incidents" starting next 
month, officials of the Office of Bank Sui 
vision said Friday. 

Under the new rules, banks will have to 
immediately notify the office if nonperform- 
ing or doubtful loans exceed 5 percent of the 
bank’s equity capital or if other so-called 


iper- 


financial incidents equal more than 2 percent 
of equity capital. 

“The rule was designed to ensure responsi- 
ble management by the banks, so that deposi- 
tors and shareholders’ interests can be pro- 
tected." said Seomoon Yong Chae. an official 
of the hank regulatory concern. 

The new rules also require banks to make 
periodic announcements of such indicators as 
capital adequacy ratio. 


Investor’s Asia 


Horig&ong Slridap^qe , v: ; - "'.;:T6Ry<i''''v': ; : 
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: -Nafbnaifi3^x..;« 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 

Iruemalintnl HerakITntwne 

Very briefly: 


• Japan will lift a long-standing ban on imports of U.S. apples 
Monday, despite opposition from local apple growers. 

• Davids Holdings Ltd. bought an 18.5 percent stake in Indepen- 
dent Holdings Ltd. from Footfland Associated Lid.; Davids has 
been trying to take over Independent. 

• Weddel New Zealand Ltd-, one of the country's leading meat 
companies, called in receivers and halted processing operations. 

• Shangri-La Asia Ltd’s controlling shareholders, the Kuok fam- 
ily. sold 3.8 percent of the hotel company's shares Tor 460 million 
Hong Kong dollars ($60 million). 

• Independent Newspapers LhL, which is half-owned by News 
Conx, had an operating profit of 47.02 million New Zealand 
dollars ($28 million) in the first half, up 14 percent from the 1993 
first half, as sales rose 3.3 percent. 

• Rothmans of PaH Mali (Singapore) Pry. a unit of Rothmans 
Industries Ltd-, plans lo open a branch in Ho Chi Minh Gly to 
market Dunhiii cigarettes. 

• Min Xin Holdings Lid, a Chinese state-run banking, real estate 
and insurance company, earned a net 25 million Hong Kong 
dollars in the first half, up 27 percent, as sales doubled. 

• Asia Croft Ltd, the main brokerage and investment bank 
subsidiary of Bangkok Bank PLC, earned a net 237 million baht 
($9 million) in the first half, up 66 percent, helped by a doubling of 
volume on Thailand's stock exchange. 

• Daewoo Motor Coqx, a subsidiary of Daewoo Corp_ has moved 

into the Australian car market and hopes to reach sales of 20.000 
units a year. AFP. Return. Rloundvix. AFX. Knighr-RnUrr 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIELD 


PERSONALS 


MAY TW SACKED KABT OF JBU5 
he adored. gfenW. laved end pro- 
ttrvtd thro ug hout the *w1d, w« a 
torevw. Sacred Heart of Jew. mr 
lor si Saw Jade, worker at toicom. 


ram pray* 

«e»w been known to fat. Pubkcban 
mmi be trowed. A.V. 


MOVING 



A.&S. I . 

A.&S. mussasj 

JLOS. BEKUN 
A-ftS. f 

A.&S. I _ 

A.GJ. PRAGUE! 
A. OS. WARSAV 


40 602040 
81)9617995 
VSMJ 508 
1 421 38 66 
264971 
16360 50 
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: 22) 562 555 


HOMESHB*. MilmfaB 
bo wage. an noddwde. Lrf me 
KwflfaBl IB 81 (near CfceroJ. 


f&INTEjRDEAN 

■ FOB AfltS ESTIMATE CAtL ; 


AMSTERDAM 

A1HHS 

BARCELONA 

«UN 

■am 

W9WI 




CADIZ 

HtANxmn 

GBCVA 

GLASGOW 

LONDON 

MADtD . - 

MANCHESTER 

MUMCH 

PAMS 

VBMA 

VKHttA 

Zurich 


ATLANTA 

WASMNGKM 


211070 
*99324 
9*1 12 12 
•52 31 11 
_ 238 54 00 
49(2241) 99920 

49(01) 170991 
“ 7592285 

•9 57 44 
2001 
343 6530 
742 44 *7 
901 41 41 
471 24 50 
877 51 00 
141 SO 3* 
39 2014 00 
845 47 06 
52 31 *7 
945 04 00 
31 30 30 
497 1337 
4004819 


32 
34 
49 (6 
41 
44 ur 
44 Bl 
34 m 


BOGCAOEl 

BUCHAREST 

BUDAPEST 

MOSCOW 

ItAGUE 

WARSAW 


EAS7BN BtttOK 


If 

7 __ 

SI, 


49 39 94 
211 82*4 
277 28 77 
224 8100 
3017239 
40 81 87 


CM NAME OM COMPANY 


NANNIES & DOMESTICS 


/Monroe^ 

Nannies 

International 



POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


NANNY FOR 2 YEAR Oft. 6 mamfa 
Europe 4 US. USD 1J» ■ ° 

month. Mm. 1 T«g. Wi 49-?l 29-2B8B. 


POSITIONS WANTED 


OCCASIONAL AND HSMANBIT 
NANNY AGENCY ta 
Bnuh Nomses aid Baby Nines fo r 

fat# 71-HMtafc L*. UK SB8K1 


NAN1®SWC0W(«AKD 

'Nflxries tvofpostal tasbuih i 
repmtan oa profesnadaoi - . 
NanctyVatid 1990 
We prom* bate woes. SON bubo.' 
mkhrins. qndM amoks & mhos' 
Was. A8 jaifaMc for Wcra/wn) 
pbcenffi Deemed Naur Agency: 
TeL 071-437-1312- But 07L457-I22& 

Office* -bud**- Pan* JtruxeSe* 


RUntS VALET, 22 YE SWT 

wc in. Able Id wo* 6 raoBhj o year 
m USA Needs responsibiiy & fcwL 
Ued to Heads of Stale. Total (fore- 
ton Prropah oofy requeued. London 
081 318 6824 


MMSIKSpumpNSAQmCY- 
Uwspeaofett far Men, OnriWi, 
Cocrpowxn. Coot/ House w* p en . . 
CoupfaTWtfL Stef. He UK 536)0 
Te$M|71 589 33* 71 5894966 



courts. Bunas, Oo* 

tnnd & expenoKed 
totted. Hmdwnons 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Attention visitors 
from the U.S. ! 



If you enjoy rearing the IHT 
when you travel, why not 
also get it at home ? 
Same-day delivery avtsiaUe 
in key U5. dfies. 

CaQ (1) 800 882 2884 

(in Now Tor* a* 213 792 3*90) 

flmlb^^Eribimc 


BRIOM. It* fimtf hand-node at. 
sefcsStesi n SuM Btrio nd <* 

_ The taxing mai l sore. 

BdxVtahff. 13. Zurich 0T-2H 29 ». 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS _ 
oeetajp Tefc R 
46 la 59 K SOME 478 0320, 

m " 


FEEUNS taWT — btwtajwta 
SOS HHP m BxjbK 3 pja- 
llpjn.TebPaoniiyaeOBO. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


CLAIMS ARE 8SNG BROUGHT 
ogoind o large muta-naond 
u anip m y. rtflhBl Court (wwilf 
demon «i Gentony ora (Aeody 
exdng and a nfMxWond coopBiy 
O nsqored^pOjyi^Mirmum d 

A partner ready to ewefi DEM 25 M. a 
reqwed to enable teaton to proceed 
tatfw. The portw ** iem»e SB, 
at ihe end mdt wtedi wi befcpr 
tree re the dam n being proeeaed 
though a Guernsey ompaiy 

For further eVooBoewi would ntorestad 

rtsSsr.®;'* 

63 Long Acre, londoa WC3E 9IH 
togedcf wafi pro ssf of their *txxji 
dWey. 


TERRITORY SALES SUPERVISOR 

Mo gum e and boat dstnbukx ho 
Ei x opeae based patoom owxtable 
mwil ttii for mawdudi who wotdd 
MfKrww the Canwenys merdxxxfa- 
jng eflorh m retal boobmes and 
base exchange* on U.S. m*H*Y base* 
duoughoat Europe- We ire seebng 
prg f e yJ CtxR eeiiMduati with men 
e«ce m icSai operations, liond re- 
qwed. VVe offer ronpeeiwe kAx«. 
□X alowcnces. tntoesled pottos 
should send resumes so: At Brown, 
Wetorhocaw 5ft 93. 97084 Wuen- 
be»i|, Germany Pro 4 49-931 412510. 


TEXTUE MACHR4ERV 

Tampon Praducftan Machinery 
Colon Swab Fornsng Modww 
Cnnoo Pad Madwe 
K. FaubnidLudwin & Co AG 
Qi8&46 Wageo b. Jana 


Td 155) 28 31 4) D* 875349 EALU CH 
TeWac 55 28 42 40 


CLASS A BANK m tax free venue «eth 
adiuaarabto smea and atdbbhrd 
batang and jrajrrfcn xaxrrs. 15 
550, OW InmedMe nareler. Csfl 


Canada («5« *0-6169 or Tm 
94M179 or Udtxi f 
fAXC7J23l W2& 


071 39* 5157 or 


2ND CITIZEN5HIP AVAILABLE 
through 100% tegd noluafaalKXi. 
Complete (Mton m W days. Iroeil- 
mefft Bom at SWJOO. FiA prctochon 
at yew funds. No payment itaess you 

wane wur doamerti. 5 «b trivew 

NEW 1 CALL BUSTBt BU5»«S home 
Wep hnne axurote. Worldwide ad» 
lequredL Generous coaunssiam Fas 
«T + 27 M 886 0*27. 


FINANCIAL SERVICES 


2nd TRAVEL DOCUMENTS. Dnwg I- 


. GM, 2 PaAhxu. Voutaaniwv. 
Aihsm 1 6W1. Greet*. Fn» 676215? 


OH5HORE COMPANIES Far hee 
btadwe or odvee Tel: London 
44 Bl 7*1 122* Fax:** 81 74B 6658 


BUSINESS TRAVEL 


WBuhmk Ooh Pmwert Trawfcn 
to Onent/ABstraka/Afnca/Na & So. 
Anenoa. Save up to SDL No cou- 


pon. no r 
El 5i*3* 


J. Imperial Cocwcki 

1-7727 fax 5KWJ-7998. 


CAPITAL AVAILABLE 


Uget 2nd Trowel Seg m ent 

• ’ — Attto 


Proneftons, NeiiioWr. T 2. CH 63 
Boor'Zug, SwOz. Fax -*-*143323*3 


HMDS AVARABUE 

FOR 

AU BUSINESS PROJKT5 
OR FOR 

LETTESS Of CREDIT 

Bank guarantees 

OTHER ACCEPTABLE COLLATERAL 

Broker i BMW gurxarfted 

Mertieurl IUPX1 4 Oe 
RNANOAL MStminoN 

Brow*- BELGIUM 

toi or no ii prr by fax 32-2-53* 02 77 
or 32-2-538 47 91 
TELEX 20277 


TO OUR 
READERS 
JN 

LUXEMBOURG 

It's never 
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Just call 
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BELGRAVIA 
ORCHIDS _ 

(0 CARDS WELCOME 

UK 071 589 5237 


ULTIMATE ’10' 

212-888-1666 
New Yotfc Escort Seme® 


MBrnpomaams 

Teh 2l*7&**6 Ne«r fo^ USA 
MjfgOtdaOrtbAaxfAei 


NEW YORK an 


Ekoh SBA*eJ?I21684 , 13Wf’ 
(712) 679-57*5. 7 doy» a -w*- 


MAYFAIR 1NTL 

I wdm bant Service 071 727 4792 


LONDON BRAZILIAN taori 

Service an 72* 5597/91 - oe* cords 


CANNES 4 COIE D’AZUR 


• ■ ZUBCH VIOtET ■■ 

Escort Service. Gedil mi actejMd. 
TeL 077 ' 63 83 32. 


LOS ANG8B - GABBY WPl 
benrt S, Gmde Sennet Bendy Hfc 
Tet Dim 28I-8fflS USA. 


, STOCKHOLM 

.... SBMC 
TEL 06 157821 


STOP. LOOK 

Mrouded m a transaction. Const* uv 
\*fert resoiFces m conbakng hrmaal 
baud Prevention lttorveirtton, Recovwy 
i posstfe. Fax: OHMNET m b»ope 41- 
22-3104917 or U5A 1-80M6675W. 

SERVICED OFFICES 

BRUSSELS - BQfiHJM 

Yoar office A Ml HnicH 

Tel: 32-2-534 85 54 

Roc 32-2-534 02 77 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

AKACHON 1231 

litaufeau-PyJa HMer, 300* horn beach 
m o cram ond resrderYid area. 
Spleidd Barque W* peried cor*«x\ 
1JD0 sqjx. par dens, 300 iqm. krag 
■pace ■* '80 iqm. ouibuAings, 
Askmn price F3 ,^50.000 

Ffauibity <ff cwdnsng 1.000 uia 
extra land, krona soolK 

Fax piawnce* (33) 47 05 42 SO 

FRENCH RIVIERA 

SAINT TROKZ 

ExpoMMy Rratarod loraty V8a 

5 m wdfang distonce from the port 
rot m landscaped gat den 
with superb swmtotjjg pool and 
panoramic «*wi cuff CStidd ad Boy 
5poaous Braa rxd rknt^ room, 

5 betkooms truth baitooonn etHirae. 
For sole h#y hmbtad 

Virvwto by rtoporntmeet. 

Crtl owner rfioct (23)94.97^1 . 

SWITZERLAND 

VOIAKS. preskwra new 2 bed duplex 
opmment, 107 styn. + 2 bafaonci. 
garage, dose to certei and staUts. 
mogwfaern wew. Al one hau> bom 
Geneva 5Ft BOOjOOO. Contact owner 
Mr MariOHr in Vrltors. Tel: 
41.2535.16^5 

USA RESIDENTIAL 

WAianONT OSBIWKH ci 

Contomporay far all MKfiOre Under- 
strted degwee w* mogntont **eer 
rawt 2 eon m on iniwel endave d 
wiprttnnt Greenmch Aopertes wuh roe 
of Dock & Beach. Owner mast lefl the 
weekS Cameqmdt. 

CM Ffatence ah 2l5-3S23*6* USX 


UABONS OF PARK IAME 

LOMX3N ESCORT SBSflCE 

IE: 071 37A 1227 

V«NA*PAW'»W«A‘n*KH . 
EUROCONTACT h*1 Escort + Tim* 
Service. CrA Vienna *-*3-1-310 63 19 

ZURICH -RAMCRKT _ , 

AkCTHYSTE WT Escort /Tra»el Smrae 
CALL SWITZERLAND 089*10 22 59. 

■ ZURICH* SUS AM* 

Escort SenrtB 

Tet- 01 / 381 99 *8 


10ND0N HEATHK3W Escort Service 
081 960 DBM Oe# Cat* Welcome 

HLWWtfH UXN DUSSBDOtf 

al ar«n, Escort Service. 

069-47329* 

MUNICH* WELCOME 

ESC08T & CUBE AG&CY. 

PfiASE CAU 089 - 91 23 14. 

FRANKFURT 8 AREA 

Maro'i Esmri Anercy. 
tWCd 00 3976646. 

••* LONDON BCORT S8TVKX 
•- ■“ KIMBERLEY*** “• 
•»*»*• TBi 071 *86 4*61 — *** 


PAJB5 -SOUTH OF TRAWE-IOWON 
71 39* 5121 


CARIBBEAN ANGH5 OF LONDON 

ESCORT SBMCE AU AREAS 
cm 23370*7 aide aril oeaptod 


AMSK>CATSBCOW«Wa 

3 ShouUnti Sjeet. Umton W1 
Tet 071-258 OOW 


ITALY • PAHS ‘ COT D’AZUR 
fttpdi fcnero bewt 
PdlNl*»W 


IMBiENCE* * - ** 
LOMXJN TCAtraOW Exon Service 
mjPT7a 50» Gedt Catfa 


’FRANKFURT * 

Frwoe* EwjH ond Trove) Semes. 
Please ad MaUe- 0161/26 32 57? 


REAL ESTATE 
TORENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


PROVENCE LARGE DETACHES <4bge 
home w*h ehmooer Steeps 8 Aval- 
nbt week 27 August aba Sqtoaber 
F2,500/wt«k mcluMto. Tel 1331 
q7«3 93 30otfo»p3|g75 0647 

PARIS AREA Ft-IRNISHFB 


74 CHAMPS OVSB 

CLAB1DGE 

FOR 1 WS OR MOW l“gh ctast 
Uudo. 2 O' 3roar* opartaentv FU1Y 
EOUBYB3 IMMBXATESESBMaTIONS 
T«fc )1) 44 13 33 33 


7TH, eVaom, imm uree*. thanang 

bedraam, douWe tamg, tojer/sMly. 
Dorians, ei rnfances, far. FT20M 
liMatTN 14&1SB47. Fan *551*62? 


cone iv. n« juu. mi. 

MONTMARTRE, UD tqjn, bg Wmg 

+ dtang, 3 bedrooms Unque. 

W T aB.Trfai4?23S0 0* 


RUI DU BAt ?/3 raorro. tunny, raw. 

044. oB anrrutos. 5-9 motmv 
)fao Owner (I) 42 22 0/58. 


SPAIN 


LOS £*ON)MOS APART MBITS 
Moreto. 9 ModncL Between ftodo 
MuSfm & fctoo Port- finest ewnple 
of t r odewnol t u nw u re. Do*y ■ WeeWy 
- MonrWy rttoL Reienanons ■ Id. (3*- 
tl 42DP211 Fra (3*11 *29*458 


7 PLAZA DE ESP ANA APARTMENTS 

lo Ihe heed d Modnd. Hgh drr& 
studns to let Daly wtoWy. man*ty 
■too. h*v equipped. Dueci iHeno- 
ton. TeL 3*15*2 B5 B5 Fa<- 
34.TJ4641B0 


PLAZA RA5WCA APARTMB05 27. 
Co iwifaft Zarito Modnd locafed n 
die financial & business area. A warm 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


PUB MANAGB/BS 

far upmOtta Britnh Pub al ir*1 Hold n 
Poland M ci your resurue toe 
Deector Hunan ReumnEs. G*y Hetol 
B5W6 Bydgoszcz, Potond 


JwnAb and 
worldwide. Send 
oft. Acaxa Uxro 


PR Agents surah* 
CV & photo to Ger 
1 4, 001v? ROME. 


GENKRAI. POSITIONS 
WANTED 


SW CAFTAM xehng pouton ® 
WaSei of Luge MOftn W **w 
Yadht US Merdwrt Maime i**mt«d 
Master s Licerae 72 years e^w«em* 
Resume 8 reference* W'Pwt to 
Catiftm Abrehom 34* 56381 12 Soon 
RE5PQNSHE MBA STUDHIT swis 
hotaesitting « Parts start Aug'sept 
W*l kirward documenrv. care for pen. 
oversee workmen, etc Good iefer 
encev CoPhAoUSA 217-477-8M*. 


GERMAN LADY totod map beaukhil 
model 1W0 w«h eicdtan PRnlrfc 
seeks ceugmett as P*/PA •» -ep«e- 
lenftntoW -6*95085 ’06 


EDUCATION AL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKERS needed 
to teach about I* hours per weel 
Mar be EEC *» have rbkd wl 
^rr^&mroreeed monrHy vkry 

own. 57 rue 


phone number » Forma- 
5W *«*. 


. 7SM2 Pam 


AUTO RENTALS 


GM1URY SELF DRIVE 

RENAULT QJO: FF239/ DAY 

/uiwauavE .notodenb[7»5 
bi mofor ones ond wprvts nfionce 
Centd reienrow*' 

TH: (33-1) 30.37^5.24 


AUTO SHIPPING 


SAVE ON CAR SMFftNG. AMESCO, 

Rnbbeslr 2. Antwerp Belgium. To fiom 

US. Afica Beguta 9»B5 toiUg. Free 
hotel. T1 3?Oi73’-4?39 F» 7?2d3S3 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


JRAN5CO BELGIUM 

The largest a» egwr' com pony 
m Europe far ihe past 20 years 
An makes and mooeb 
Export sale*rej«iflrl«i» 
bhppmg- murance 
European. Ahitan 8 U.S wees 

Tronsco. 51 Vosse-schrjnsrr . 
3830 Antwerp, BeVjuti'. _ 
Tel- 03 '5*762.40. fax D3’5*I5S97. 
irter 35307 Tiart B 


ATX WOUDWIX TAX FR ft CARS. 

6fpart + jhrppng 4- leosJranon of 
new & used ears. ATR NV. Ternfflekta 
*0. 2930 Bnmdiacii, Betatn. Phwie- 
Q) 64550W; Tetai: 3JS3 j: Fa»- (3) 
6457109. AT* 


itmnr TAX-fRE used 

AUL IEADMG MANES 

5ome doy regwroten Pontic 
renewable up k> 5 yews 

We oho regswr cars wnh 
[eipxed) lormgri pax-iiee) pfetes 

OKOVTT5 

Alfed Esdter 5treel 10. CH4027 Zunch 
Tet 01/20? 76 10 Telex. 815915. 

Fra. Of T07 76 30 

OCEANWIDE MOTORS 

Smce 197? brokers far Mercedes. BMW. 
fcrvhe. GM 8 Ford Woridwide 
Oetrvtry. regsftolon 4 sfapment 

OCffi-eaMANY 

Ter5teegnrsf 8. D-*0*7* Dueuddort 

Tel 101211 - *3*6*6. Fax 45*2120 

EURO + U.SA. SPECIFICATIONS 

EAC Oven Deynoarweg 1130A. 
2586 BA The Marne. Hofond Teh 

31 70 3559245 Fx Sfiift?* T« 33230 

EUROPE AUTO BRONSS. Inc 

Tet- IWkw) pi) 34Q74**®* FaifiOW* 

BOATS/YACHTS 

SUNSfflCHl CAMARGUE46 - As new. 

200 hours. 2 . 550 GM dad. or 
condrttorvng. Moored m Cams. 
USSmoOO Fo* p3) 93 <3 17 70 

HEALTH/MEDICAL 

SERVICES 

REJUVBBATION COUNSELLING m 
Engtoh & French now vs PAHS EtwkL 
TrfU7 66 00 7*. Fax 1-45 74 &* *& 

LEGAL SERVICES 

IMMIGRATION TO CANADA 

Canodan knngration lowyer will 
prepare Vaa flpfftcanon and conduct 
pb iearch for prcspeceve rantorants. 
Contort Leonard Sxncoe, Bet. H. 1255 
Lwd Hvd, Suite 208. Mount toyd, 
Quebec. Canada H3P 7TI. Fax- {514| 
739-0795 

DIVORCE FAST. J29S0Q. P.O. Box 
80*0. Anahem. CA 92802 Co*' Fax 
(714) 9688*05 U5A 

LOW COST FUGHTS 

WORLDW83G. Speed departure al the 
lowed ever rkscou"*-. economy oufare. 
Getki cods pascUe. TeL Pcxn P| 4? 

89 1081 Fox *2 56 25 B2 


1959. 


WOOD AVIATION - SCHEDULED 
FLIGHTS 1st. business, economy at 
tawetf tares. Tel [FT Pans (J)*70W51 


FRIENDSHIPS 


FRIENDSHIP 


EBMpHnud Worm of S et ftee 

who p osttues beaury/iideAgator/ 

(km'tderaftaauMf n ocUtoa to a 
great warmth and eampBoan In' 
erhers. She exudes grew style « every 
atped of her Eh whether wtamg 
team or a due drets/«ebng a 
loaantre rknmtr hr two or argantmg 
extravogar# hnagl inner partte*. She 
ts fewK t al y indep e ndent- She 1 n 
search of an eftgble Eixopeonr 
Ameneon btaneuuun MO-55) who e 
eetradave, wtA-groomcd. itahroxtoie 
btuer, nftCgert but street anari. 
romantic, wan, compassionate, 
sense of humor, aid faanoaly mde- 
pendenr to haw mi hanesi rektoomhip 
wifc Pfease ml rocem photo & 
phone = to: Box 5*06. WT,850Ttad 
Aw, 8* R. NY, NY 10022 USA. 


BJRQPEAN MARRIAGE 6UIEAU 
G»do«*il|y. Brtsh MonagemenL 
BPLAY MTL Gztelano, 93 
n#a 4 ‘ 20046 Modal 
14 34-1 -556.1 AZ7 ha 555.99 J7 


TAIL 


, SUM, blonde' 


bdy woh sporUng penonakiy°on3 
many mtotrshL wishes to meet 
weaHhy. unufturJmd gem, who <% land 
and generous, has o good sente ol 
hmw. v* a «tw to marnoae TeL 
UK 0850 44429? 


COSMO POUT AN, aristocratic 
bad&ami rah eras and gw* v& 
senafey. 60 age yang, WOO**, 
charnarg. seeb mti nerifemop with 
too sooal oAwd badttraund SAM, 
IfflO We*H Dr,. Import Beach. 
CA yaffle, fae 714/6*2-7111 USA 


AMERICAN SINGLES Se«^."B 

JtyTXWC-roonvjgc. BrodwTO 

knro\ 255* Lnrin. “IIVMDJL 
CA 9E91 USA Phont Qlffl28W'^ 


NUBS: French textile artB*. *2. ongle 
kd, sin, wdl eduared. irodnomf 
vdues. seeks to meet senna Christen 
gentleman. linanoaBy secure «* 
beautiful residence. Write to Bo* 
IMP LH.T F-92521 Nesxfty Cede*. 


PRETTY AMBBCAN WOMAN, toll. 
Am. blonde, tamg m London, seeta 
BXxeuU, sxKere, fanf generous and 
honorable gertfetnan far rnnudK 
lewcvdng fason. CcA London on |44) 
71 


HS® YOUR PERFECT PARDOt in 
McVlftne's woridwide dub lo» smgle 
men & women Ask lor bee brochure. 
McWtae, PO Bo* 907. 96® 3*»to*a 
Denmark. Fax **586 8012 5* 


YOUNG SMGtES WOBDWBE seek 

hcnh/bfemaMs. Free into: Henret. 

Box 1 10660/ E. D- 10634 Berta 


HAVE YOU BS9I SEARCHING fat the 
tod mole dedmy holds far yetf We 
con beta CM far bra mtormchon <n 
full txxrhdenoe. Mary Sanders 817/ 
536-9033 USA. 


fk mamoge. L 
ICE BREAK 05 5*5 OrdtaraRd, 104X3 
For East SuppxigCir. Smgapare 0973 
Tel 65-732® ; S5n> 235 


SOULMATE (The Agfa Owe) Exduuve 
agency far pgdnerv Mease »nra lo- 
Saufmete Suite 501. Im'l House. 223 
Heqent 5i ■ London Wl> SCO England 

ATTRACTIVE YOUNG MODB seeks 
bnonooAy setae petym Able ta 
travel T« Fierce 03) 075*2214 IPor 
»Ue phonej or ('1 *2671962 (Pa^ 


ANIMALS 


TOP 5HOWJUMFMG HORSB exceL 
lent seta faynems breeding foem. 
^•armondbrBarjax^MwejTelJwlWOft 


ARTS 


HUNTINGS (IS) by renora Soviet 
arks' Tojjrul Nonmanbekov. Cotdogue 
rorSomr mduded. Provenance: quex- 
onteed. SSDJDOO US. Tek 508785-2*15. 
Foe.- 50878^03*5 


iUSA 


PSE-COUIMBUkN ART 
GALBBE ALTAACBKA. ScHwcterr 82 

COLLECTIBLES 


DA U WANTED ” 

Parts (Sum d belme I960 HIGHEST 
MBCES! CM 'rax Pomck m US.. 2* hrv 
PK (310) *59-8883. Fax- plO) *51-2090. 


EDUCATION 


INTENSIVE GERMAN COURSES m 
Vienna (Austna) dutmg whefe year. 
AnsnaAmencas Society ft ooapero- 
ton wflfi the Goetfo-ireMuie. A- 1010 
Vang, Shdfeurgatne 2. W +0-1- 
512398?. Fax +T3-1 -51 39123 


COLLEGES & 
UNIVERSITIES 


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INTERNATIONAL 

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IN SATURDAY’S 

INTKNATIONA1. 
HERALD TRIBUNE 
TODAY 
PAGE 6 


FRIENDSHIPS 


00 


SCRIM) 

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SOPHISTICATED INTRODUCTION 
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- - — For responsible people ■ 




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Page 12 


NASDAQ 

Friday's 4 p.m. 

This list compiled by the AP. consists of the 1,000 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value. It is 
updated twice a year. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, AUGUST 20-21, 1994 


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47 26 . 

32% 10%) . .. 

34* 11% flamwa 
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19* IfiaPirlGoos 
36 atoPrtsMort 
30 6%PhnriMltt 
32 laMPMrtn 
Xto iB%PhvC0r 

Wo S3™ 
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J ?*!5BSS£? « 

39% 3*PkASHS 

17* Ttowrc 

29%i4%Pknwn 
69* X to Pwnoft 
» IdtoPHEnSr 

a* AtoPtxRva 

47% 18 Presiek 
auu PrkCsts 
35*29 PrcRflB SA0 

rra * 

17* HUProcyt 
34% i«%praffm 

29* 10 nrotuB 
8% StoProtaon 
iz SHPrwsy 
27% l6toRvBfefh 
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w&t 

17 9 

43*15 Outvcms 
33*I9*QB%0d 


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16 251 Hto 

3A 11. IS 1B% 
= .2945*1 Jto 

_ 49 104 45* 
_ 8 19a 11* 

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3 a 43 X* 

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46% 46* -4* 
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30% 31 — * 

W% 36* +% 



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19% ISto RPM 

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23* 9% Recoins 
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18% 3*Reaervn 
36%29*RasnFn 1J0 
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25%ll*RanafTrt 

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11* 3*RtaOm 
18*13 RicWdS 
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18* UtoRossSfr 
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28% 3 Sapiens 
32 IOViSOVOV 
28% 12 ScnAdc 
33’A 17V, Schnflzr 
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30% 17% Schuler 

28* 31 StNmns 
27* 4*SdOane 
43 16%SdGnvi 
63 25 Sctaied 
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51% 34 secCOP 
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2A *9 630 13* 1^ 55J -*i 


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A n 56 IB 19* 20 -M 

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JO 1.1 a 255 X* 25% Uto - 

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J2 3J 13x1078 19* 18* 19. _ 

- 20 623 S* MS -M 
_ 12 442 15* 15* 15% 

- 818154 26* 24* 25% — % 

- — IQ AVt 4 4* -* 

_ _ 58 47% 47% 47* -* 

_ _ 367. 4% 4* 4* _ 

_ _ 1723 17% 16% 16% — 

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AMEX 

Friday’s Closing 

Tables indude the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not retlec 
Hate trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
HWi Low Stack 


DN YM PE 1081 jW LowLaestOToi 


AIM Sir A2 52 


V,AMI 


“ zT 


1J5 


_ 18 
7.0 _ 
_ 7 

_ 4 


SJ .. 
16 

_ 11 


1A5 I3A _ 

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.15 J 11 


26% 20V. . 

5% *9% ARHhM _ 

a t h w§r* l s. , B i 

75* 61 9, Art Fd 2J19 40 _ 
8* 4 Ac*: Com ~ 

4 AflmPiC 
lTkAdvFin 
17* MtAdrMoo 
3% *AdvMedT 
5* 2 AthrPhOt 
14 to 7% AirWlBf 
4* ltoAlrcoo 
7* StoAtamco 
Uto BViAIboW 
Sto 3to AkH-tOn 

IB*', 16 AHooonn 1A6 
17* 3* AHORyi 
Ilto 7toAltouH 
6to 3, Alpnoln 
11 «*AtainGr 
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r/ u *Am«tn 
14to 9V- VPHP7 
X 1 ., 16* AFS1RT 
25to X’-VABkCT 
X lSUAmBatS 
1»>, ItoAE XBi 
I* to 13* AIM 85 
14to 1 1 to AIM 86 O 
15 IttoAiMMn 
52 31toAlsroot 
18% 1 7* Am List 
Z2to MtoAMzeA 
211, MtoAMaeB 
14to 6% Am Poo n 
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12% 7toARestr 
5* TtoAScJE ^ 

4to VuAmSnrd 
S 3to,ATechC 
13 to 6% Amort 
2V« % Amort w, 

X* 9to Anorea 

6 1% AnoMig 

15to toAnoPor 
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11V. Sto ArfcPjl 
2>/„ ‘Vi, Armtm 
10 6 ArrmhA 

17V« itoArtiytn 
4to 2 Asirare 
Ito %Astrt wt 
17% ThAton 
7% 5 AHontK 
* V.AttSCM 
3"/u 1 Alias wt 
I8to 6toAudwn 
3-'.. v„Audre 
9* 6 AirarEI 
2* 7/uAzcon 



S liS 
2* 2* +* 
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11* 11% - % 

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Vi* S' *■% 

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ilto n* —* 

17* ITto _ 
22to Xto —to 
28% 28% — % 
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I* VB6NMr 
S* 9*B&HO 
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Me 6.0 - 


_ 21 

79*!7*BNFBC AB U 13 
25 19 BocferM TX 12 15 

II 5 Baker ... 

5*3'VuBa»w _. H 

23to UtoBanFd 1.91 e BA 10 
2J%II*BTcv7V,nlX 43 _ 

Hto71toBTcY7to l.X 44 _ 

to VnBanyHI _ _ 

M«14(tBarrL0 _ 31 

71% 5% BarvRG 5 _. X 

21 lOtoBayWd JO IA 29 
5 2'V u Bayau _. 113 

6% 2ViSSHKwr _. _ 

7*3"toBSHK0Wl - -. 

3% 3%BSJPfTWt _ - 

Jto I'/.BSJonpwl - _ 

3S*39*BSMRKn 2J1 5J _ 

2* JUBeordCo _ 6 

3v„ * Bel mac _ ._ 

Mtois oenge ... i? 


8* 6* Ben Eye 
7 ', Borov a 


UOe 12 _. 


104 B 2 , 

15* J to Beta Well 
73* 19 * ara vu 
21*10 &ORA 

Sto toBtaonm 
IS* 11 BIkBIO? 
14MIUBCAIQ 
ia*llV,HNJlQ 

14* 1 1 V, BN via 
48 36toffloirCP 
34%X*Biemw 
47 UtoBtauniA 
42 14 to Blount B 

16V. UtoBoddle 
5* iv,Bowmr _ _ ... 
72 X%Bowwpi3X 7J 
XtoUtoBowrtr J6 1.6 
f* THffrodRE 44 7J 
I7to 8* Brandn Jfl 1.8 
5’.; ItoBrandirw J7oICL6 
td(* 9*Bncng im ia 
j»„ itoButfton 


J7s )J 

1J5 93 
■20 49 
77 46 
.79 44 

2J58 42 
.70 2.0 
20 1J 
AS 1.1 
1J4 48 


_ 3 


1 % 
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21 76* 
16 Xto 

3 

61 6 
131 5* 

72 22* 
96 X 
46 33V, 

905 
48 . 

153 I ' 

S 18% 

96 4* 

63 3* 

45 3* 

110 3* 

34* 

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302 6* 

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9 11* 

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307 39* 

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4 40 
302 92Vi 

154 6* 

X IS* 
73 5* 

IS 14% 

115 I* 



45 

473 

9 


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d Jto VO — Vu 
U3to 3* —to 
2* l* ♦% 
34* 3J* •% 

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90* 91% ‘% 
6% «% * to 
a* a* 

21* Xto 
IV, 1 
11 11 
ii* mi —* 
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45* (Sto , 
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13* 14* _ 

2U7, mtrn -. 
40 40 

X* 29* —to 
8 % 8 % — * 

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14 14 _ 

lVu 1% ■ Vu. 


i to 
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3 


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ll'.iC/BFn J2b 2.1 U 

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J9 CObtWl - -■ 

iv-iCmieAs JO J 7 

l V,, Colton _ 

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leUCombry 30 -9 13 

10 OVtorcfl .78 


66 

127 

IX 


14 18 

I 5% 
7* 
6% 
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17 15* 

15 l'Yu 

49 '9u 

166 X 

1 24* 
11? I'/u 
140 12% 

3 73% 

4 Ilto 


17* 17* —% 
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6% 6* .. 
1% IV,. ■ V, 
15% 15% —to 
1% I* -to 
to ‘Vu _ 
57* 57* -to 
26* 24% „ 

iv„ IVu - 
U* Uto — % 
M% 93% -% 
11* II* ■ * 


12 

HWi Low Stack 


Ov Yld PE 180» HWi bowLKenOttoe 


l Low Stack 


Dhr YU PE lQQi 


ftiftSBS A? 


- - 178 

m M I *1 

iS « 5l 7 * ST ^ 

MtoUtoCreMOA AS 2J 15 17 

36 HtoCraFd 1A0a 70 - 4 

F X 3 if ’I 

ft ttigia, zz £ 
t’sSkss ’U 7 3 : iK 

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Z%i£ 

- 44 9 

- 13 749 

.11 3 io m 

_ _ 1328550 

UOa 4.1 10 J 

P» 1J1 72 Z 25 

--SJ 

.18 15 U 357 
_ 25 49 

- ta 204 

- — 379 

_ _ 51 

JO 32 - sr 

*ac*3 ’? ; a 

- 38 3M 
■MtiaS ff a 

n J4e 3.9 I 50 
_ 471 


18 

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ft I 


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I to tYuDMtad 
4* 2toDRCA 
8* 6 DanIHg 
«s ItoDcfamt 
im 4toDanram 
7% 2’Yuuawstr 
4 l*Oavttwt 
8* 5%Da*or 





11% 

19* .. 

10 3 

9% *DNCam 

!S* lftS^piSd 

20% 14* Donelly 
TO* 7*DryCal 
ilto BtoDrytMu 
11% 8% Duplex 

ftiSW" 




1 1% *V, 

2% 2% * * 
7* 8* -to 
4 4 to, rV u 

Sto 5* *% 
3H 3Wu •* 

1% m - 
6 % 6 % — 
11* 11* —% 


p-5 



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36V) 20* Eton im 

IsP^ 

»to Sto 

XV, 25Vj 
19% 9Ju 
21% 7% 

BSRl._ - 

18%10*gquusil 
sto itoEscnn 

’ft’ftfSSn 

13% StoEM.uA 
lBto dtoEidZav 
I ■ Vm toEwrJonn 
Xto 14* Exert 

39* M Rbrbd 
79* 43% FiW 
ITOMbfinRS 

14* 9toFtAmt 
Ilto 9%FAtnPr 

’ft ItoFJ^on 
22 l6*F1aP0t 
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32 22* Fluke 

15* TOtoFoodnn 
44* 34 Fame A 
52* J9*FortlUj 
% VuFortPtwt 
6* IHForiPei 
3Vu lYuRrumR 
Sto TUFounPws 
6* 4tofrkREtl 
5* 3 Fndeln 
s* itoFrtcSupn 

8* StoFraqli. 
8* StoFrnenws 
4* jtoFrisflm 
15* litoFrtscte 


_ _ 141 1* 

_ _ TO 2* 

_ 37 X 8* 

_ 222 1405 U41A, 

„ „ 153 5* 

_ _ 41 3Wi, 

_ _ 4 Ito 

- II 16% 

?5 liU 6 * 

*55 rto 

ito IVu Ito -to 

Jto* 2% 2* _ 
10% 10* 10* — % 
14% 17 -to 
5* Sto *% 
3 * Vu 

B* Bto —to 
I 11* <■% 
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Saturday-Simduy, 
August 20-2/, 1994 
Page 13 






y . ■ t\i!‘ V* 


L y^I - Cpi-UMii == I International Health Plans Vying for Growing Legion of Expatriates 


By Barbara Wall 


International Health Care 


B E the medium The World Cup, 
The World Clainpioiishm of 
Basketball or The Super Bowl, 
to name just a tew high-profile 
contests, the world’s universal language 
has become that of sport. And sports are 
about nothing, as the current professional 
baseball strike in the United States weB 
demonstrates, if not about money. 

What piques the interest of this column, 
as the strike brings the issue to the fore, is 
just how much money athletes earn today. 
The figures warrant the scrutiny, perhaps 
the wonder, of people who think that a 
salary of ray, $300,000 per year — or even 
of $200,000 or $100,000 — represents an 
extremely fortunate levd of affloeade; 

According to Forbes magazine; 'the 
highest-salaried professional athlete ; of 
1993 in a team sport was Reggie White, a 
defensive lineman for football’s Green 
Bay Packers, whose $9 minion annual 
compensation worked out to $562*500 per 
game during the regular season. In second 
place was Ryae Sandberg of baseball’s 
Chicago Cute, who earned $7.1 million 
for playing second base. Next was Emmitt 
Smith, a running back for football's Dal- 
las Cowboys, who made $7 million, or a 
tidy $437^00 per game. 

These, of course; are just a few major 
stars. Butin the NatiosafBasketbaU Asso- 
ciation, the overage -salary, is. about 513 
million per year, and in U.S. major league 
baseball, about $1.2 million- BasebalTs 
ira-Hian salary is $50QJ)00. 

While it*s difficult to comprehend such 
enormous compensation bong paid for 


expertise at tasks such as shooting a ball 
through a hoop, hitting a ban with a bat, 

existiTbecause theTaws of^supply and 
demand have created it. 


The question, perhaps, is if that says 
anything about the qualities chat present 


society values most and is willing to sup- 
port to such an extraordinary level. Is it 


pure physical strength? Grace? Determi- 
- nation? In-your-face machismo? 

V Whatever the true answer, finding it 
might have a value of its own. P.CL 


T HE growth in the number of both 
tourists and business people 
spending extended periods of 
time outside their country of resi- 
dence has placed new focus on interna- 
• tional health care plans, say experts in the 
f?eld. 

V The reasons to seek a plan which offers 
coverage for accidents or illnesses which 
occur abroad, many add. are evident 
enough: First, policies purchased in one's 
country erf residence frequently limit cov- 
erage to medical expenses incurred while 
in that country. ' 

- Second, and equally important, the cost 
of medical treatment is soaring every- 
where, not just in the United States where 
health care reform is second only to rrim^ 
as a nugor political issue. Indeed, in most 
countries medical inflation continues to 
"outstrip broad indexes of consumer price 
inflation. That means that even a relative- 
ly short stay in a hospital can be financial- 
ly crippling if you are not covered. 

A spokesman for the UJL- based inter- 
national health insurer Medicare - said , for 
example, that a claimant recently spent a 
few weeks in a hospital in Singapore fol- 
lowing a road accident, running up a bill 
of over $15,000. 

. “Costs can assume nightmare propor- 
tions for prolonged Alnesses,** the spokes- 
man said. “Another claimant , who was 
diagnosed as having cancer of the colon 
wiuleworirirg in the United Arab Emir- 
ates has so far received treatment to the 
tune erf $104,000.’* 

' Most hospitals will treat emergency 
cases regardless of whether or not the 
patient can pay immediately. But even 
that can be of small comfort if the hospital 
ispowiy equipped or lacks qualified staff, 
conditions which frequently occur in re- 
mote locations. In extreme cases, emer- 
gency evacuation can be the only alterna- 
tive. If that service is included in one’s 
insurance package, it can often be ar- 
ranged swiftly. 

According to Michael Kelly, president 
of International S.O-S. Assistance in Phil- 
adelphia, which specializes in emergency 
evacuation services, the majority of evacu- 
ations are the result of trauma due to 
accidents. “In Asia, for example, orthope- 
dic trauma-related injuries result in twice 
ns many evacuations as do infectious dis- 
eases. cardiovascular and digestive prob- 
lems," he said. 


Page 15 

HMO shares 

Biotech stocks 

Medcal emergencies abroad 


Assistance rushed a female scuba diver 
suffering from decompression sickness 
from Mexico to Houston, evacuated a 
man with appendicitis from Siberia to 
Helsinki, and speeded a woman suffering 
from a brain hemorrhage from Turkey to 
Boston. 


Most expatriates, of course, recognize 
tire need for some form of health insur- 
ance while overseas, but some analysts say 
that a surprising number have inadequate 
ooverage. “People tend to view insurance 
as something which can be stinted on, 
because the likelihood is that it will not be 
needed,” said David Pryor, director of 
ExpaCare, another UJL-based global 
health insurer, echoing a view expressed 


by physicians and independent observers 
as well “As far as health is concerned, it is 


as weu. “As far as health is concerned, it is 
not worth cutting corners." 

if one is living in a country where the 
cost of health care is amoog the highest, it 
is worth considering paying a higher pre- 
mium to get the requisite level of cover, 
analysts say. Indeed, if one resides in 
Singapore or Hong Kong, for example, 
which are notoriously expensive locales 
for medical treatment, a policy which lim- 
its the maYimnm annual cover to. around 
$100,000 could prove quite insufficient 


Those researching which international 
policy might best suit them are also ad- 
vised to examine geographic restrictions. 
Many providers offer staggered premium 
structures with relatively low fees for cov- 


erage that excludes expenses incurred in 
the United States, Canada and the Carib- 
bean. and much higher fees for truly glob- 
al coverage. 


In a recent week which was fairly typi- 
cal, Mr. Kelly said. International S.O.S. 


One benefit of the growing number of 
people traveling and working abroad. 


Executive Benefits Shrinking as Care Costs Rise 


By Afine Stiffly an 


F AT SALARIES and generous 
perks used to be de rigueur tor the 
expatriate executive. Employers 
believed that they could post, 
their best people abroad only by offering 
irresistible packages, including compre- 
hensive medical coverage. - 

But chose days are oyer, say employee- 
benefits consultants. For one thing, com- 
panies acre finding that executives can be 
convinced to relocate abroad more easily, 
with far fewer enticements. At tbe same 
time, freezing or cutting medical insur- 
ance benefits is proving a valuable way for 
companies to cut costs. 

.. “Expatriate executives used to get the 
best of everytinng” said Bob Hertzman, 
director of international benefits and 
compensation consulting for auditing firm 
Erast & Young in New York. “That has 
become less true in recent years. Compa- 
nies are trying to cut down on costs by 
getting their employees into the local 
health systems as fast as possible." 

For the executive, that may not be such 
a bad thing. In many European countries, 
the national health care systems offer 
benefits superior to the scope of the aver- 
age private insurance policy. Most major 
surgery analysts say, is paidforby pubfic- 


compre- 


Arranging the appropriate health care 
policy can be an onerous task for both the 
executives and their employers. Coverage 
will depend not only on the employee’s 
destination, but also on his or her nation- 
ality and on the amount of travel expected 
during tbe duration of tbe policy. 

Satisfying these requirements isn’t 
cheap, particularly at the level appropriate 
for the so-called executive polices. Soaring 
insurance premiums have encouraged 
many multinational companies to under- 
write their own health insurance policies 
for expatriate employees. Insurance com- 
panics are engaged only as policy adminis- 
trators. ’ 

“Most companies in the U.S. with a lot 
erf expatriate workers are providing their 
own medical insurance;" said Mr. Heitz- 
man. “Tbw only purchase special interna- 
tional medical policies if the employee is 
going to a country where the local health 
facilities are not satisfactory." 

In such cases, the in-house cover is 


ties with companies such as International 
S.O.S. Assistance in Philadelphia and In- 
ternational Health Insurance m Denmark. 
Both companies offer a wide range of 
medical, and emergency assistance aimed 
at expatriate executives and tourists re- 
maining abroad for extended periods of 
tune. 


prescription costs, home nursing and out- 
patient treatment. 

“This level of cover can be very com- 
forting for expatriates, ’’ said Paul 
O'Grady, marketing m a n age r at Private 
Patients Plan, the second largest private 
health insurer in Britain after British 
United Plrovident Association. “It is also a 
very individual choice. We are finding that 
more and more people are choosing the 
health care products they warn and are 
getting reimbursed by their companies." 

Others aren’t so lucky. Increasingly, ex- 
patriate executives can find themselves 
paying substantial sums out of their own 
pockets for a high level of care for them- 
selves and their spouses and children. 

A recent survey by ihe benefits consul- 
tancy arm erf the auditing firm Price Wa- 
terhouse revealed that 32 percent of the 
200 multinationals questioned required 
employees to participate in the cost of 
their own medical insurance while abroad. 

“Companies are trying to cut costs and 
many will use local facilities wherever pos- 
sible." said Mari Simpson or Price Water- 
house's expatriate compensation and 


benefits consultancy. “Another option is 
for companies to limit the level or cover- 


for companies to limit the level of cover- 
age -they provide and allow employees to 


contribute to any extra. It is all part of a 
trend to cutting back on expatriate bene- 


screenmgs ana otner care. Many execu- 
tives returning home after a stint in Eu- 
rope are surprised to discover that they 
never needed their private insurance. . 

Nevertheless, most executives expect 
more from their employers. The prospect 
of waiting hours in the waiting room of a 
European public health clinic or months 
for a non-essential operation does little to 
sooth executive stress. And relying on the 
local health care systems in the developing 
world — or forgoing private insurance in 
North America, for that matter — is tan- 
tamount to madness in the eyes of many 
expatriates. 


Other, smaller companies often cover 
their executives with expatriate or third- 
country national polices from multina- 
tional insurance pools such as American 
International Group, Swiss life, John 
Hancock or Aetna Generali. 

-So, -what are the perks of executive 
status? Health insurance policies geared 
to expatriate executives typically include 
higher levels of overall coverage than stan- 
dard policies, often over $1 million. 

Also on offer are disability insurance 
and benefits like dental and optical treat- 
ment. Travel and emergency transport in- 
surance, excluded from many employee 
heal th care policies, are often attached to 
executive policies. Other perks include 


trend to cutting back on expatriate bene- 
fits." 

That trend is even more noticeable 
among companies sending their employ- 
ees to the United States, where the premi- 
ums charged by foreign insurers for expa- 
triate medical expenses insurance reflect 
the high cost of health care. 

In the long term, say analysts, substan- 
tial cuts in the costs of health care benefits 
for expatriate executives based in North 
America or the developing world won’t be 
possible for most companies unless signif- 
icant changes are made in the health care 
systems of these countries. 

In Europe, observers add, further cost 
cuts are more feasible, so the waiting 
rooms of Europe’s public health clinics 
may become even more crowded over tbe 
shortterm. 


Service in Demand: Finding English-Speaking Doctors 

F ™>WO - ^S Cy ' VaC ° adOfliS “ t0 “ ati ' 

physician for Americans, ant- cany covereo, Matthew l^wis. a sal 

ons and other-native English So far this year, American Expresshas at u.S. Assist 

speakers afflicted with medical received over 700 inquiries to medical E • 


F INDING an English-speaking 
physician for Americans, Brit- 
ons and ■ other 1 native E nglis h 
speakers afflicted with medical 
problems in foreign lands was once very 
much a hit-or-miss proposition. Now,' 
high demand from consumers has 
spawned referral services which make 
such an endeavor much easier. 

Perhaps best-known among such ser- 
viraTihat offered byAmwican&- 
prS- Under its Global Assisi program. 
American Express provides its card- 
holders with referrals to English-speak- 
ing doctors throughout much of the 
world, and will help arrange emergency 
evacuation if necessary. If a pattern is 
not traveling with sufficient fundsjo 
cover medical costs, ihe comply wffl 
also arrange for an advance. For holders 
of the company's platinum card, the cost 


of an emergency evacuation is automati- 
cally covered. 

So far tins year, American Express has 
received over 700 inquiries for medical 
referrals and assistance, according to 
SaUyann Colonna, vice president of the 
company’s platinum card division, al- 
though Jess than 5 percent of those cases 
required an evacuation. 

American Express contracts the medi- 
cal assistance it offers cardholders from 
US. Assist, a Bethesda. Maryland-based 
concern which, in addition to providing 
English-speaking worldwide medical 
and legal referrals, mil also replace lost 
medication and provide up to $100,000 
for evacuation costs as part of a policy 
costing $95 annually. 

Indeed, due to poor hospital fatalities 
in some international locales, evacuation 
is chosen as the best way to serve the 
patient, even if an English-speaking doc- 


tor is at hand. “There are some locations 
where well evacuate you if you break 
your arm," says Matthew Lewis, a sales 
representative at U.S. Assist 

A free booklet of English-speaking 
doctors in hundreds erf global destina- 
tions is available through the non-profit, 
Lewiston, New York-based Internation- 
al Association for Medical Assistance to 
Travelers, or 1AMAT. A copy of the 72- 
page, pocket-sized edition will be sent to 
anyone who requests it. 

“We check to be sure the doctors we 
list have been educated in the US Can- 
ada or Europe,” said Helen Joyce, a 
spokesperson. “Out doctors have also 
agreed upon a pre-set fee of $45 per visit 
buL obviously, if hospitalization is re- 
quired, you’ll have to pay more.” 

To contuci IAMAT, cat! it 116) 75-4.4883. 


To contuci IAMAT, cali f 1.716) 75-4.4883. 

•—Bale Netzer 



International Healtti Care Plans 

Premiums and coverage for sp&d$oct:aQa brackets, converted to U.S. dollars at 
Gurrentmtes. :. v . 

' Maximum Ag 

British United ‘ - Ww*»«Hb ■ . WwWwkta coverage brae 

smisfj united • cova»a^{«<cspl Coroage 

Provident Association v&ano cy»da> • . 

"Essential V ■' ■^■-S48A ' .••$ 1,675 ■ $ 750,000 ■ 30 - 


I ,.v- I 

c. 


Age 

bracket 


Odd ' 


**L 'I $?26V 


■••$ 1 , 67,5 

$ 2,094 

$ 2,512 


$ 750,000 
No Lint# 
No limit 


30-39 

30-39 

30-39 


Private Patients Plan, an international 
health concern based in the United King- 
dom, deals with about tour or five emer- 
gency evacuation cases a month. “While* 
this sounds like a fairly small number, it is 
a vital service for the people involved," 
commented Philip Healey, head of the 
company's marketing and sales opera- 
tions. PPP also offers a compassionate 
travel facility which pays for a relative or 
friend to travel with the patient at all 
times. 






ExpaCare 
Essential , 

Complete 

Medicare . 

frdemafiorial ■■■ " 

Executive International 

Private Patients Plan 

Basic ’ 


V* • ?. 

) 

b i 


$1,681 
$&l 815 


$308,006 

$7704500 


30-44 

30-44 


$ 1,598 ■ $ 1 , 540,000 


$1>54O0OO 


40-44 

40-44 


■ £18,480 


40-44 






Intemational Mesficai Roro$654to. $1,024 based on. oooooo 39-39 

/yy . Group ' ’• de&jd&fa • * <*1^ 

£ 1 * r— ; 


international o W 

S.O.S. Assistance : -f* 


. x fitfaryieraeftty evacuation 
*••• and repatriation. Annual 
; T..plwaiumfe93rf0: • 


S '-rf1)Alsoe«*K*e6a»£^i3be»». 

• TetephOtt Nwr«»« J»A. - (fcUi). 353.8212; 

• £xp«care -(44:4831 740090: Iterffcam- ifi4.fi > 81&2G08; PJ».P. - <44-882; 515167, UML - (1} 212.263.5488. 
215544.150a j • 


IntciTLilKniJ Hcrikl Tnhvne 


however, is that health insurance policies 
are becoming increasingly sophisticated 
and price sensitive. Nowadays, coverage is 
available for just about anything — in- 
cluding injuries sustained in war zones — 
and it needn't cost a fortune. 


Standard products which offer coverage 
for hospital services, emergency evacua- 
tion and local ambulance services start at 
around $400 per year. “There is little point 


in opting for an elaborate policy if you are 
based somewhere like Nigeria, where 


based somewhere like Nigeria, where 
medical facilities are pretty basic, " said 
Mr. Pryor. “You will need to ensure that 
the policy covers you for medical evacua- 
tion." 


Most of the so-called “executive” insur- 
ance packages offer outpatient coverage. 
This may include dental treatment, optical 
expenses and genera] practitioner costs, or 
could just be limited to outpatient hospi- 
tal services. Make sure to check the fine 
print Many policies ask the insured to pay 
an extra charge for outpatient treatment 
and other add-ons, but such coverage may 
still be worth having, analysts say, if it 
covers medical expenses for one’s children 
as well. 


plunge, experts say. As well as comparing 
benefits and prices, check the method of 
reimbursement. And do not assume that 
the insurer will pay the doctor or hospital 
directly. Costs may have to be paid out of 
pocket before an insurance claim can be 
filled out and processed. 


Finding the right policy can be time 
consuming, but it is worth researching the 
market thoroughly before taking the 


If fees must be paid up front, and that is' 
frequent particularly with relatively small 
claims, analysis suggest asking if reim- 
bursement can be made in the currency of 
one’s choice. Depending on exchange raie 
fluctuations, it might be advantageous to 
receive reimbursement in sterling or U.S. 
dollars rather than in the country where 
the expenses are incurred. 



W hat would happen if you or 
your family needed medical 



international 


v V your family needed medical 
treatment whilst living abroad? 

Are the local health care facilities 
accessible and adequate? 

If not, is private medical 
treatment affordable - probably not! 

Membership of the International 
Health Plan from Private Patients 
Plan (PPP), the UK’s second latest 
medical insurer is the solution. 

It ensures financial peace of mind 
and provides access to the best 
medical facilities for you and your 
family. 

There is a wide range of options 
from which to choose, so you’ll be 
able to select a scheme that’s just 
right for your needs and budget. 

For full details return the coupon 
by fax to (44) 892 515167 or by 
post to: 

PPP International, 

PPP House, Tunbridge Wells, 

Kent, TNI 1BJ United Kingdom 

Alternatively, and if you require 
immediate cover, telephone any time. 


HEALTHPLAN 


PPP Imrmatbiaal ffcaNh Plan e. ipccific-slb deigned far wpairtiies. Non«xpurav:s mav 
appli Kibjiv i hi Jnt jppluablr gcitrainf; bivt « com rot rrtaibdurct 



! 

TITLE: Mr fj Mrs G Miss ZH Ms □ Dr. •!} Other i I 

SURNAME: 

FORENAME: 

ADDRESS; 



COUNTRY: 

TEL NO: 

FAX NO: 


niRRENT SCHEME: 


RENEWAL DATE: 








Page 14 


INTE RNATIONAL HERA LD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY^SUNDAY, AUGUST 2G-21, 1994 






ASIA AND THE PACIFIC 1994: 
MERGING BUSINESS AND THE ENVIRONMENT 



The Regent Bangkok, Thailand - December 7-8, 1994 

spied to promote dialogue between For further information please contact: 


CONFERENCE 

ORGANIZERS 




.An international environment forum, designed to promote dialogue between 
government ministers, leaders of business and industry and leading environmentalists 
worldwide, with a view to harmonizing economic growth and sustainable development 
with environmental responsibilities. 


ror zurtner imormauon please contact: 

Vivien Peters, Asia-Pacific Conference Office, 
International Herald Tribune, Hong Kong 
Tel: (852) 9222 1163 Fax:(852)9222 1190 


Tfc * a *-<f ftnirauuni hadtau rren 




JJ LS* \ j S jO 































































































■ T . ” t ~ ?*; Vji«V' r • - ■ 


\ 


BVTERKATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 20-21, 1994 


Page 15 




THE MONEY REPORT 


Source: Bkiomborg 


Outlook Is Guarded on Biotech Stocks 


By fain Jenite 


I MAGINE bring able to buy a stake : 
in a single oflwefl, in which invesr 
tors are funding the exploration. be- 
fore the drilling has even started. If 
oil is found, investors could make a for-' 
tune overmgbJL But if only mudccroes up, 
everything would be lost: Such a game 
would be perilous indeed. • 

Yet that is what in vestmg in hio technol- 
ogy is like, according to 11m Willis, bio- 
tech analyst at the New York: i 
Hambrecbi & Quist. If one of. the 
publicly quoted biotech companies gets a 
drug to the market, hcaobe Kke stnking 
oil for those who invest hrit.:, 

Biotech is clearly not an investment for 
the faint-hearted, as the experience of the 
past two years has shown: The sector has 
halved in value since its peak in early 
January 1992, amidastrmgQfpoorresults 
from mandatory dinjnii trials, 

Jeremy Cu mock-Cook, fund, manager . 
of (he $182 million London-based Bio- 
technology Investments limited, which is 
ran by the asset management firm NJM. 
Rothschild, says; “Share prices are found- 
ed not on commercial results, but on hope. ' 
When you take away the hope, the result 
can be frightening” 

Syncrgen Inc. was once ahigh-flying 
biotech company with a drug designed to 
cure septic shock. The company's -Share- 
rose steadily in the second halt of 1991, 

' ig at $73.50 cm January 8, 1992. 
lit was discovered that the new “won- 
der drug” didn’t weak® wefl'as expected. 
Today, the stock is languishing at around 
S4. 

The few funds investing in the biotech 
sector have also suffered. Oppenheimer 
Management Corp. decided- to throw in 
the towel on its biotech fund after its share 
price plunged from a high of $30 in Janu- 
ary 1992 to about $17 recently. Oppenhei- 
roer now plans to merge this $200 million 
fund into into a new “global emerging 
growth” fund. 

“Our shareholders were thrilled when 
the fund was up 121 percent,** said Robert 
Doll, chief equity strategist at Oppcnhei- 
mer in Chicago “But the last three yews 
haven’t been modi fmL The problem with 
bong a sector-fund in bioteal is the vola- 


riKty. You can’t step aside when yon want 
to be out of the market” .. 

Despite these setbacks, biotech seems 
to hold a fascination for' investors, say 
analysts. Like penny shares or the roll ex- 
coaster emerging markets, it offers huge 
riches if the investor can pick the right 
stodcr And after over two years in the 
doldrums, it is showing signs of life again. 

*Tn 1991 everyone loved biotech,” said 
"Mr. Wiffis at Hambrecht & Quist. “That 
’ meant itwas time to sell the sector. Today 
• everyone hated it, which means it is tune to 
buy the hell out Of the sector. Biotech will 
- be back soon.” 

Anyone who bought Amgen Inc. when 
its shares were trading at about $5 in 
'• January 1989 enjoyed quite a ride. The 
stock: reached a high of nearly $80 in 
December 1992 on ihe back of two drugs 
which, respectively, promoted the produc- 
tion of. red and white blood cells. The 
shares have since fallen off to about $53. 
Genentech Inc. had a similar bull run. 

But anyone expecting spectacular re- 
turns from biotech stocks may well be in 
for a disappointment One of the key 
problems faring the industry is that it is 
-getting more and more difficult for bio- 
tech companies to develop new products. 
Only about 10 percent of new biotech 
(bugs receive approval, say market ob- 
. . servers, and the climate is now more com- 
petitive than when Genentech and Amgen 
burst 'onto ihe scene. 

: “Many companies come to the market 
on far too optimistic forecasts," said An- 
-thony Milford, fond manager of the $15 
wiittinm ftamtington Health Bund, which 
has 25 percent of its assets in biotech 
shares. *Now, there are far too many com- 
panies, many of which need cash. There 
are going to be a kit of deaths along the 
(m«c pfDaiwinian principles.’' 

. In the short term, a boost could come 
from from a spate of mergers. Analysts 
say that some of; the bigger pharmaceuti- 
cal companies are fikdy to realize that 
they can get their hands on good technol- 
ogy for rode bottom prices, which could 
Ignite the Sector. 

Rut a sound recovery will have to be 
bared on positive dimeal trials from a 
number of drugs. A current test case way 
be Griisia Ihc^ whose new drag Protara, 



cau- 


deagned to prevent heart attacks in 
pie undergoing bypass surgery, has ' 
the shtgect of much speculation. 

In July, Genaa’s shares fe& from $10J25 
to $7.25 on sentiment that the drug, which 
was in clinical trials, would be ineffective. 
The shares recovered slowly to $9.50 on 
August 12, then leaped 29 percent to 
S1Z25 cm August 15 based on news that 
trials of Protara had been halted. The 
stoppage was interpreted by some ana- 
lysts as an indication that the trials had 
proved the drug effective. Final results 
won’t be available, however, for another 9 
weeks. 

Mr. Cumock-Cook, of NJM. Roth- 
schild, says: “Recovery could start with 
Gensia. It then has to build up to consis- 
tently successful clinical trials from other 
companies if confidence is to be restored. 
Over recent years confidence has been 
badly dented. There is always the possibil- 
ity that someone will stub their toe again." 

For the investor, the question is which 
companies will get their drugs to the mar- 
ket Mr. Milford, at Fr 
lions: “The investor : 
rise. There are going to 1 
winners but also a lot of losers.” 

Mr. Milford said that Centocor Inc., 
which develops cardiac, arthritis and can- 
cer drugs is a “screaming buy.” Since July 
1992, its shares have plunged from a peak 
of $45.75 to around $13 mis week. 

Other analysts recommend Cocensys 
Inc:, which develops drugs to treat disor- 
ders of the central nervous system. Its 
shares were trading at around the $4 level 
this week. Genetic Therapy Inc-, which is 
using gene therapy to tackle brain cancer, 
is alio on a number of analysts’ “buy” 
lists. Its shares have surged in recent 
weeks, and are now trading at around $9. 

For many investor, the gamble associ- 
ated with individual biotech stocks is too 
much. They may prefer investing in one of 
the few remaining biotech funds, such as 
Fidelity’s Select Biotechnology in the 
United States, or the Rothschild fund in 
Britain. By investing in a fund the risk is 
spread. 

In a sense, analysts say, investing in a 
biotech firm is like investing in a tradi- 
tional pharmaceutical company which has 
a number of drugs in the pipeline, only a 
few of which ever make it to the market 


moreexper- 
a number of big 


NighfniJttr% Scenario *Be Prepared 9 Is the Motto 


By Michael D. McNtdde 

N ORMA Beecroft, a 
Canadian resident 
who was studying 
musical composition 
in Rome, bad a severe head- 
ache. She sought help [ram lo- 
cal doctors for a suspected mi- 
graine condition. 

With the best of intentions, a 
local physician prescribed a pain 
killer that worked well for most 
of his Italian patients. The prob- 
lem, which she soon found out: 
The same medication destroyed 
white blood cells in many people 
of Anglo-Saxon descent A week 
later she was teetering between 
life and death. 

The Canadian Consulate 
called in Dr. Vincenzo Marco- 
longo, a prominent Rome phy- 
sician who received his medical 
training in Canada. Miss Bee- 
croft said the doctor almost im- 
mediately suspected the medi- 
cine. He ordered blood 
transfusions, stopped the inedir 
cation, andJviiss Beecroft made 
$ rapid recovery. 

Such scenarios are typical, say 
analysts, of the kind of catastro- 
phes which can befall people liv- 
ing or traveling abroad who 
don't take the time to assess thdr 
health before departing, or who 
fail to think, m advance; of 


whoe they might turn in case of 
a medical emergency. 

Miss Beccroffs experience, 
which occurred about 30 years 
ago,' made such an impression 
on Dr. Marcolangp that he 
founded the International As- 
sociation for Medical Assis- 
tance to Travelers, or IAMAT, 
to help provide better care for 
people traveling overseas, 

“The biggest mistake people 
make is that they go unpre- 
pared,” said Asstmta Uffex- 
Maicolongo, IAMATs presi- 
dent, who has ran the group 
since Dr. Marcolongo, her hus- 
band, passed away in 1988. 
“They think it’s Hke at home, 
and that’s a big mistake;” 

David L. Karos of Landis- 
bnrgi Pennsylvania would 
probably agree. Mr. Karns. a 
62-year-old owner of a drain of 
snpennafkets; was on the be- 
ginning of a six-week vacation 
in Grenada with his wife when 
trouble strode. 

“I got cold and dammy,” he 
said. “There was pressure on 
my chest and pain down my left 
arm. It was just like somebody 
was standing on my chest I 
mean, just a classic heart at- 
tack.” 

Mr. Karns said a local doctor 
confirmed that he was.baving a 
heart attack and gave him a 
shot of morphine for pain. Un- 


Alliances Offer Coverage 


E xpatriates m 
search of medical 
insurance have 
been turning in in- 
creasing numbers to self- 
belp aJhances that combine 
an understanding of tbebr 
members’ needs with the 
clout to . obtain attractive 
policy terms from under- 
writers. . 

.Among the best-known 
of these is the Federated 
League of Americans 
around the Globe, or 
FLAGG, which is based m 
Washington D.C Member- 
ship costs $25 per year and 

allows expatriates access to 
the group's health rnsur- 
i4 ance plan. 

1 The FLAGG plan, which 
is underwritten by Bnash 
insurer Norwich Union, 
provides up to £500^00 
($750,000) worth of cover- 
age for medical and hospi- 
tal expenses- . ' ‘ 

Insured people based w 
countries where medical fa- 
cilities are commonly sub- 
standard are also provided 
with emergency °ftispcat 
to the nearest adequate 


hospitals. In Africa, for ex- 
ample, patients are moved 
to Europe. Those in the Car 
ribbean are returned to the 
United States. 

The FLAGG policy 
costs £513 annually for ex- 
patriates based in Europe 
and most other developed 
regions. • 

Information on other 
services . for expatriates can 
be gleaned from other alli- 
ances such as the Associa- 
tion of Americans Resident 
Overseas, in Paris, and Fo- 
cus Information Services in 
London. 

The FoBomng Telephone 
and Fax Numbers May Be 
Useful to Readers: 

FLAGG.fi 302) 628. 
5488. Fax : (1.202) 628. 
5485. 

Focus Information Ser- 
vices: (44.71) 937.0050. 
Fax: (44.71) 937.9482. 

Association of Americans 

Resident Overseas: (33.1) 
42.04.09J8 Fax: (33.1) 41 
04. 09. 12. 

— Afine SidfivaD 


fortunately, there was no other 
treatment available. 

“I was taken to a hospital,” 
Mr. Katns continued, ‘Vhich 
was quite unusual to our stan- 
dards. I mean, I was laying in 
the emergency room, and there 
were blood stains on the ced- 
ing.” The local doctor rave Mr. 
Karns some good medical ad- 
vice — to get off the island. 

Luckily, Mr. Karos had spent 
$90 to buy a 90-day policy with 
International S.O.S. Assistance 
in Philadelphia, a company that 
specializes in emergency medi- 
cal evacuations of Americans 
abroad. S.OJS- sent a Lear jet, 
doctor and nurse along with so- 
phisticated equipment and look 
Mr. Kams and his wife from 
Grenada to a hospital in West 
Palm Beach, Florida. 

Dr. Norman Brachfeld, 
S-O-S.’s medical director and a 
professor of medicine at Cor- 
nell University, remembered 
another nightmare scenario. It 
involved the president of a ma- 
jorU-S. brokerage firm who de- 
veloped severe chest pains at a 
European airport on the way to 
catch a plane back home. 

Dr. Brachfeld said the execu- 
tive could easily- have had a 
massive coronary on the seven- 
hour ride back to the United 
States. No medical care, of 
course, would have been avail- 
able on the flight 

“When 1 asked him why he 
didn’t just alarm someone and 
have mem get an ambulance 
and hospitalize him in the for- 
eign country —which had good 
medical care available — he 
said be didn’t want anybody 
dse to look after him. Dr. 
Brachfeld said. 

“But the real reason was be- 
cause he didn't want his family 
to be conc e rned about him be- 


ing iB abroad. Now, that’s a 
totally irrational sort of thing. 
But it’s the kind of thing (hat 
occurs, not infrequently, when 
people arc very far away.” 

Jet-lag and fatigue can also 
contribute to coronary prob- 
lems. and for fast-paced inter- 
national executives, Dr. Brack- 
feld said, there is sometimes a 
tendency to minimize the po- 
tential dangers. “You’re talking 
about an international execu- 
tive who is under a good deal of 
stress and strain because of the 
titive nature of what he 


or sue does. These are the clas- 
sic denyers who refuse to accept 
the fact that they’re vulnera- 
ble.” 

But cutting down risks can be 
relatively simple. Dr. Brachfeld 
said that traveling executives 
should consult with their own 
physicians before departing, 
ana should take ample supplies 
of any current medications with 
them. “People frequently will 
find that they can’t replace 
(medications) abroad if they 
run out," he said. “And they 
should also keep with them 
some record of any medical ab- 
normalities.” 

Other physicians note that 
electrocardiogranis and other 
vital records can now be shrunk 
down to wallet size, and that 
such records can save lives 
when emergencies occur. 


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HMO Shares Get a Healthy Prognosis 


By Conrad de AenHe 


U NCERTAINTY is supposed to 
be the worst thing for financial 
markets. And if there is one 
thing that has recurred with a 
fair degree of certainty since Bill Clinton 
was elected president and began thrashing 
out the issues of ihe day with the U.S. 
Congress, it is uncertainty. It is surprising, 
therefore, that shares of U.S. health care 
providers are performing extremely well, 
even as the debate on reform becomes ever 
more muddled. 

Standard & Poor’s index of health care 
companies' shares has risen about 17 per- 
cent this year. That is considerably better 
than the broad-based S&P 500, which has 
barely beat able to muster a 2 percent 
increase. 

The health index took somewhat of a 
roundabout journey, however, to achieve 
that strong return. It rose 17 percent from 
last August until early January, lost back 
the entire gain and a bit more by early 
April, when the entire market slid, then 
made it all back in the following three 
months. 

While such skiitishness reflects doubt 
about Congress's ability to satisfactorily 
legislate changes in the financing of health 
care, the net positive bias shows a growing 
faith by the investing public that the na- 
tion's leaders will reach a successful con- 
clusion to the matter — in other words, 
that they will end up doing little or noth- 
ing to affect the fortunes of companies 
providing health care, say analysts who 
follow the industry. 

“The conventional wisdom is that if 
President Bill Clinton can't get a crime bill 
through, how is he going to get through a 
bill that affects 14 percent of gross nation- 
al product,” said Brian Stansky, an ana- 
lyst at the T. Rowe Price fund manage* 
ment company. “You’ve gone from early 
’93, with people going into panic mode 
because they had no idea what was going 
on, to feeling that reform will not be as 
fast or as sweeping as had been feared.” 
Thomas Gallagher, the political analyst 



Source: Bloomberg 


Immwn tonal Herald Trihonr 


membership fee that entitles them to visit 
doctors approved by (he organization. 

“Managed care is the baric investment 
theme forhealth care stocks of the kind of 
bill we expect.” Mr. Gallagher wrote in a 
report. “Health care stocks generally get a 
boost from expanded coverage, and mar- 
ket reforms should induce greater enroll- 
ment in HMOs. That is especially true if 
some kind of tax measures encourages 
purchase of low-cos L plans.” 

Mr. Stansky agreed that HMDs stand 
to gain the most as the American health 
care industry evolves. HMOs, he ob- 
served. are in the coveted first position in 
the health care “food chain.” Meaning, he 
said: “The HMO is the first to get paid.” 

The companies, moreover, are doing all 
they can to make sure they get their hands 
on as much of the money spent on medical 
care as possible by offering more services. 
“HMOs are moving from bring classic 
middlemen to being more risk taxers and 
care providers," Mr. Stansky said. 

Their principal way of doing that is to 
employ more doctors, so that if you want 
medical care, you've got to go to them. 
“You want to own and control the prima- 
ry care." Mr. Stansky explained. “It's pri- 
mary care lhai influences 80 cents of every 
health care expense dollar. If you control 
it at that poinu you control it the rest of 
the way down the food chain.” 

Mr. Stansky also likes the industry be- 
cause it is finally shedding its image of 


Margot Durow. who follows HMOs for 
the brokerage Punk, Ziegel & Knoell. is 
positive on the sector as well: “I like the 
group very much. They're better compa- 
nies than they were five years ago. They 
have more experienced management 
teams, they're generating lots of cash, they 
have strong balance sheets with no debt, 
and they're cutting costs.” 

Miss Durow added that the industry 
has spent a Jot of money improving its 
information technology and is “just begin- 
ning to see cost savings from that invest- 
ment” 

The companies she recommends buying 
include PacifiCare, which she described as 
“a very well-managed, large HMO with 
product diversity and geographic diversi- 
ty. It really has it all, a very well-thought- 
out strategy, an excellent reputation.” 

Two smaller companies she said were 
worth a look are Vencor and Physician 
Health Services, and she also likes United 
Healthcare, which she said is “excellent, 
with a superb management, arguably the 
best in the industry and the standard by 
which other HMOs are measured.” 

Mr. Stansky is also inclined to wax 
rhapsodic about United: “There are just a 
number of things going its way. It’s very 
forward thinking in terms of now health 
care is delivered, and in terms of bringing 
together costs and quality. It's the biggest 
company with one of the fastest growth 
rates.” 

Not everyone is as confident of the- 
industry’s prospects. Some brokerage 
firms have downgraded the group. Shares 
of many sector companies, including 
United, have lagged those of othei health 
care businesses lately. 

“There is some negative sentiment that 
wasn’t around a few months ago,” Miss 
Durow said. “And we’re at the end of the 
health reform debate. A few souls out 
there are waiting to see what comes out of 
Washington.” 

In the end, though, she believes that 
“HMOs are going to be fine. To get from 
here to there, you’ve got to have HMOs. 
They’ve got the technology, the experi- 
ence. They’ve led the way all along.” 


a bill wifi be enacted. Hie biggest beoefi- gument against HMOs is they skimp on 
daries in the health care industry, he said, quality,” ne said, but lately “they have 
are likely to be health maintenance arga- discovered that quality is free and lowers 
nizations, or HMOs, in which clients pay a costs and brings better results.” 

The Money Report is edited by 
Martin Baker 


1 , i ■! f-s-s-gB - : ■ : - j = = ^ 

City Of London Opons don, England SE5 8RD. For further 

Rwanda Relief Drive Haro in London 

The City of London has launched an ^ ^ ' * _. 

appeal to raise £1 million ($13 million) to Gold Demand Rises 
go toward disaster relief in Rwanda. In lf>S- and Japan 

Checks payable to COLERA may be Second-quarter gold demand in devd- 

sent to the appeal at the following ad- oped markets (consisting of Western Eu~ 
dress: Secretariat Office, Disasters Emer- ropean nations, the United States and 
geacy Committee, 17 Grove Lane, Lon- Japan), rose 3 percent to 192 metric tons 

compared with the like period last year, 
according to the World Gold Council. 

Next week in the Money Report: A look 
at chemical and waste management, 
stocks ; an update on ecological funds and 
the ethical investment community. 



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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY»SUNDAY, AUGUST 20-21,-1994- 


SPORTS 




Baseball Talks 
To Resume With 
Owners at Table 


By Mark Maske 

Washington Pn\i Srnrcr 

WASHINGTON — Major 
league owners will join the play* 
ers. the negotiators and federal 
mediators at the suddenly 
crowded bargaining table when 
baseball's labor talks resume 
next week. 

The players’ strike reached 
the one-week mark Thursday, 
and some progress was finally 
made. John Calhoun Wells, the 
head of the Federal Mediation 
and Conciliation Service, met 
with the representatives for the 
owners and players in separate 
sessions in New York, and af- 
terward announced that the two 
sides would resume negotia- 
tions next week. 


There will be a meeting on 
Monday in New York to set the 
schedule for the week, and the 
two sides plan to be back at the 
bargaining table on Tuesday or 
Wednesday. 


The most significant develop- 
ment was that both sides agreed 
to have five or six representa- 
tives join their negotiators in 


Impasse 
Remains 
In NHL 


The Aunautnl Pres* 

TORONTO — Contract 
talks between the National 
Hockey League and its 
players went nowhere, but 
players say training camps 
will open in less than three 
weeks despite their differ- 
ences. 

A six-man delegation led 
by Gary Betiman, the NHL 
commissioner, met for 
three hours with members 
of the NHL Players Associ- 
ation bargaining commit- 
tee. led by executive direc- 
tor Bob Goodenow. Both 
sides emerged from their 
first collective bargaining 
meeting in five months to 
say nothing of substance 
was accomplished. 

“We did not make as 
much progress as I would 
have hoped,” Bettman said. 
“It was a very small step in 
terms of the substance. 

The players, who have 
been without a contract 
since last September, are 
unhappy with Bettman’s 
threatening $20 million in 
contract rollbacks, in such 
things as medical insur- 
ance. paying their way to 
training camp and elimi- 
nating the $54 per diem al- 
lowance for training camp 
and the regular season. 


participating in the stalled talks. 

The players have attended 
negotiating sessions throughout 
the process, but the union has 
been frustrated by the absence 
of the owners from the bargain- 
ing table. There has been con- 
stant friction between the own- 
ers' negotiator, Richard 
Ravitch. and union officials — 
and even more friction between 
Ravitch and the players — as 
management tries to install a 
salary cap and the players vehe- 
mently oppose one. 

Ravitch said he did not know 
which owners would be at the 
bargaining table. But sources 
close to the situation said that 
the Milwaukee Brewers' owner 
and interim commissioner. Bud 
Selig. would probably not be 
among the participants. Selig 
declined to comment on his 
possible participation. 

Donald Fehr. the Players As- 
sociation' chief, said: “When 
the owners are present you 
have the possibility of actually 
having dialogue with the people 
who know how their businesses 
are run . . . and have the au- 
thority to make decisions. 

“But it does not indicate in 
and of itself a change in sub- 
stance. What we have to see is ir 
the substantive positions of the 
parties change. I do not have 
any reason to believe that any 
of this indicates their position 
has changed.” 

Wells said the groups of own- 
ers and players would include a 
mix of representatives from 
small- . middle- and large-mar- 
ket teams. The players will ap- 
parently draw their participants 
from the union's 12-member 
bargaining committee, and 
sources said the preference of 
those involved in the delibera- 
tions would be to keep the par- 
ticipants the same from meeting 
to meeting rather than rotating 
them. 

Peter Angelos, the Baltimore 
Orioles' general partner, who 
has criticized the owners' al> 
sence from the bargaining table, 
praised the development. 
“That's a step forward. Ange- 
los said. “Very definitely, that’s 
a positive development.” 

Angelos indicated that he 
would gladly sit at the bargain- 
ing table if asked. But he has 
made many enemies in the own- 
ership ranks with his recent 
candidness, and he conceded 
that he almost certainly will not 
be asked. 

The progress came just when 
matters seemed to have reached 
a low point. The Montreal Ex- 
pos become the first team to 
announce strike-related layoffs, 
and the New York Yankees 
sent more than half their staff 
on vacation. The Florida Mar- 
lins plan to ask an undeter- 
mined number of their 90 em- 
ployees to take their vacations 
beginning Sept. 1. 



Jack Sharkey, 91, 


ion. 








LimUjiil Hnico 


OOOOOOOF! — Rastislav Novak lies sprawled on the velodrome floor as his Slovak teammate Peter Bazafik is 
helped by a trainer. They collided with Italian cyclists during a qualifying round for the tandem sprint at the World 
Cycling Championships in Palermo, Sicily. The race was run again (twice again, actually) and die Indians won. 


Saratoga August Classic Pits Bull vs. Cat 


By Joseph Durso 

.Vnr York Timet Semite 

SARATOGA SPRINGS. 
New York — “The only one 
missing.” Jimmy Croll said as 
the 3-year-old colts gathered for 
the return match, “is Go for 
Gin.” 

He was right. Go for Gin. 
who won the Kentucky Derby 
three months ago. will duck the 
stars and skip the distance on 
Saturday, and will wait four 
days to sprint seven furlongs in 
the Forego Handicap. 

But six other colts were en- 
tered on Thursday in the 125th 
Travers Stakes, with a purse of 
$750,000 and championship 
status for the winner. And by 
the luck of the draw, the two 
archrivals for the season's hon- 
ors will start from adjoining 
gales on the inside: Holy Bull in 
the No. 1 slot. Tabasco Cat in 
No. 2. 

Nobody sensed any major 
advantage or disadvantage in 
the draw, especially since the 
small size of the field meant less 
chance of a traffic jam or any 
rush toward the inside. Holy 
Bull, who has taken the lead 
and held it almost every step of 
the way while winning 10 of his 


the Jim Dandy Stakes here 
three weeks ago. third in the 
odds at 5-1: Concern, winner of 
the Arkansas Derby, next at 12- 
1 : and Copper Mount the long 
shot, at 15-1. with a strong 
chance that he would not even 
go to the post. 

The sixth horse in the field 
was the “rabbit.” Commanche 
Trail, the stablemate of Tabas- 
co Cat who drew the No. 6 slot 
on the outside, and he may not 
go to the post, either. Wayne 
Lukas, who trains both horses, 
said again that the “rabbit” 
might not serve any great role 
because Holy Bull and Tabasco 
Cat both can run faster and 
farther. 

Commanche Trail has won 
two races in nine starts in his 
career, both at six furlongs. But 


Lukas held open the option of 
running the “rabbit” to push 
Holy Bull into a fast pace so 
that he would have less steam in 
reserve when Tabasco Cat 
makes his move. 

“We're getting an outside 
post with Commanche Trail 
and I'm not sure he can get a 
lead on Holy Bull from there.” 
Lukas said. “We might run turn, 
and we might not run him. 

“Actually. Tabasco Cat has a 
pretty good turn of foot. We’ve 
got kick when we need it- We 
spent all spring getting him to 
be a stalking horse, and when 
you get to the Super Bowl with 
a passing attack, you'd better 
throw the ball.” 

Pat Day, who will ride the. 
Cat from California, said. “I 
think Tabasco Cat is capable of 


putting pressure on Holy Boil 
and hanging in there to the fin- 


and hanging in there 
ish.” 


But Mike Smith, who rides 
Holy Bull insisted that he. had 


no qualms about the weather, 
which was wet on Thursday, 
nor the challenge of Tabasco 
Cat in a crucial rape of a mile 
and one-quarter around two 
tight turns. He also discounted 
the fact that Holy Bull ran 12th 
in the Kentucky Derby on a 
muddy track in a rough tangle 
of horses. 


“There were a lot of reasons 
he ran badly in the Derby,” 
Smith said, “and 1 don't believe 
a mile and a quarter was one of 
them. I've had him draw away 
at a mile and an eighth without 
even asking him.” . 


*■’ ; ; - By Robert McG.-. 

- Thomas Jr. 

' ■’ New York Times Service 

Jade Shaikey, the bantering, 
cocksure boxer who captured 
the world heavyweight champi- 
onship in an unlikely victory 
over Max Sdimding fa 1932 
and reHnqinshed it a year and 
‘ right days later in an even less 
Hkely loss to Primo Camera, 
died Wednesday in Beverly, 
'Massachusetts. He was 91 years 
old and had been the oldest 
former heavyweight champion. 
; His family said 'the camc -of 
death was respiratory arrest. 

Feu- all the ^ory of his year- 
long reign as champion. Shar- 
keys entire- 13-year career was 
studded with footnotes to the 
Golden Age of Boxing. - 
‘ Partly because he had 
" changed his Lithuanian name 
to win acceptance in the Irish- 
dominated boxing , world of 
Boston and partly because he 
was a bit better at boasting than 
he was at boxing. Sharkey was 
as. hated as Jack. Dempsey was 
beloved when the two faced 
each other at Yankee Stadium 
on July 21, 1927, .,. 

Through the first six rounds, 
the resounding boos that had 
greeted . Sharkey’s introduction 
were largely, stifled as it became 
painfully obvious that the 32- 
year-old ..Dempsey. who had 
lest the championship to Gene 
Tunncy the ' previous Septem- 
ber. was no match for the 2Ar 
year-old Sharkey. 

. Then in the seventh. Demp- 
sey. swinging furiously* landed 
a low right arid Sharkey., clutch- 
ing his mi drift. turned to the 
referee to complain. While he 
was looking away.. Dempsey 
landed a haymaker that 
knocked him into the middle of 
the previous morning. 

■ ’ ForDempsey, who retired af- 
ter losing the rematch with 
Tunncy two months later, the 
knockout was the last victory of 
hiscareer, and hedidnot apolo- 
gize for it. :.>•• • -i 

When asked why he had hit'a 
marvwho wasn't looking, Demp- 


sey replied, “Whai was 1 sup- 
posed to do. mail him a letter” 
- Sharkey’s first title fight also 
featured a famous }ow blow, 
and his last produced an even 
more famous complaint. ■ . 


On June 12. 1930. fighting 
■hmelina for the title, which 


Schmeling for the title, which 
had been vacant since Tunney’s 
retirement two years earlier. 
Sharkey landed a . low blow in 
the fourth round, knocking 
Schmeling out but giving the 
German the title by foul. 

Two years later, after fighting 
Mickey Walker to a draw and 
winning a decision over Car- 
nera in 1931. Sharkey fought 
SchfaeUng again, on June 21, 

. 1932. He won die title in a con- 
troversial split decision that 
drew boos from the crowd and a 
legendary lament from Schme- 
ling’s manager, Joe Jacobs, who 
shouted into the .radio micro- 
phone. “Wc wuz robbed .” 

. Sharkey did not defend his title 
until a year later, when the giant v 


Camera landed a stunning right- 
hand uDDcrcut that knocked nim 


hand uppercut that knocked him 
put fa tte sixth round. 

' .After two more losses, Shar- 
key retired, but be made a 
comeback in late 1935 that last- 
ed untU Aug. 18,1936. when he 
faced a young boxer named Joe 
Louis, who had been knocked 
'oul. by; Schmeling just two 
months earlier. Sharkey lasted 
three rounds, and he said later 
that Louis had been the fiercest 
opponent he had ever faced. J 

Joseph-Paid Cukoschay was 
born in Binghamton. New 
Yorfc.-on Oct^ '26, 1902, and as a 
child in ' an irnrhigrarit' hons£- 
hoid he grew tip speaking Lith- 
uanian. It was when he was get- 
ting a start as.a boxer in, Boston 
that he was persuaded to 
change his name. He chose Jack 
Sharkey in hdoor of two boxers 
he admired. Jack Dempsey and 
Tom Shaikey. 

He retired with a record of 38 
victories. 13 defeats. 3 draws 
andl no-decision. ’ 

-• He was inducted into the Jn- 
tefta at tonal Boxing "Hall of 
Fame efflrlier this yeari -' - **- 


BASEBALL 


IARD 


Japanese Leagues 


NFL Preseason 


Central Laogoe 


12 races, can shoot straight 
ahead and never look back. Ta- 


ahead and never look back. Ta- 
basco Cat. who won the Preak- 
ness and Belmont Stakes stalk- 
ing the leader, can stay right on 
his heels and wait to strike. 

The linemaker at Saratoga 
Race Course cut it appropriate- 
ly close. He made Holy Bull the 
favorite at 4-5. Tabasco Cat 
next at 6-5. Even in the early 
odds, the Cat was stalking the 
Bull. Then came Unaccounted 
For. who outran Tabasco Cat in 



w 

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GB 

Yomluri 

5* 

42 

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Chum chi 

57 

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300 

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Hiroshi mo 

48 

51 

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10 

Yokohomo 

45 

53 

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ABt 

12Vi 

Yokutt 

44 53 a 

Friday* Resalts 

AS* 

13 


Tim nhi >*3 Oomti 
New England 17, W aJ ilm t oii T7 
Son Franrtsco 3d Son Diego 21 


SAN DIEGO— Fired Reggie Woller, asste- 
tont general m a nager. 


BASKETBALL 


CFL Standings 


Vomlurl a, Hiroshima 3 
Honshln 4, Onmktil 3 


Pgcltie league 
W L T 
Selbu St, 42 0 

Orta ■ S3 43 2 

Kintetsu S3 44 3 

DoM 54 44 I 

Lotte 41 59 0 

Nippon Ham 38 40 3 


PCt SB 

371 — 

344 ZVj 

345 2W 

340 3 

-410 It 

391 IB 


Winnipeg 

Baltimore 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Shreveport 


Friday's Remits 
Seitai 7. Orli 5 
DoM U Kintetsu I 
Lotte 4. Nippon Horn 3 


BrU-Cotumbki 
Ca leery 
Edmonton 
Las Vegas 
Saskatchewan 


W L T PF PA Pts 
5 3 0 *7 725 18 

4 7 0 M4 173 B 

7 4 0 m 725 4 

7 5 0 201 2S0 4 

ISO 134 HI 2 

0 4 0 104 734 0 

•stero Division 

5 1 0 344 174 10 

5 1 0 738 114 10 

S 2 0 701 150 10 

3 3 0 186 1M 4 

330 14T 154 6 


MINNESOTA H omed Kevin McHokr- as- 
sistant general m an ager and Chris Palmer 
hood t r ainer. Promoted Web Babcodc to May- 
er personnel director. • 

NEW JERSEY— Shm ed YV Uco Dare, cen- 
ter. Io o multiyear contract. Nomad Jen r 
Eaves assistant coach. 

l_A. LAKERS— Named Hurt Rambts spe- 
cktf Bsstatartl cdkK 

SACRAMENTO KINGS Re s i ded OUBI 
Potyntca, center. 


Dovld > HoiUcr defensive -tedder and Shane.- 

GREEN BAY-WoSfidKurtMtamer. nuar- 
terbock; Charles Arbudde. tWH end; Adam 
WO Bar, running hack,- Daryl Frazier, wide 
receiver: and Jt*m Fisher, ender. Claimed 
Lance Zeno, center, oH waivers from the At- 
lanta Frtcons. ■ 

INDIANAPOLIS— Waived RuM CampbeJL 
tlgN andl .’ . v. - 

AUAMl— Waived Robert Dovfs^omerbacfc. 

N.V GIANTS— Waived John brand's, tight 
ind-- • ’ " : 

■ M.Y. JETS — Waived Jefl CooKe. defensive 
tackle: Paul Yoh m ni l. def e nsive end , - jock, 
to Otn tackle; Ounmoev H agan, wide re- 
ceiver; Dan Schmidt, center; and Crts Shale. 


CALGARY— 51 good TtteverKldd.vortlend- 
1 ifrrtt t ji y; pqntrnet * fj 1 
HA RT FORCH-Signed Sfeven Rtae. right 
wing, to a itnrtttycor contact. 

WASH tNGTOW— Agreed to ' teem ■ with 
Randv BurrWeAleft vdng. and Rao Pearson, 
on 1 -rear contracts. . . 
COLLEGE 

" ARIZONA-STATE— Named Pot Morphy 


ARIZON A - W aived Alex Smith, fuHbocfc. 
BUFFALO— Waived Brian Duvts. comer- 


PITTSBURGH— Signed. David Treadwell. 

ptocefc better. •• 

SAN DIEGO— Signed Jrfm Kidd, punter. 
Waived Kent Sullivan< ganler. 

SAN FRANCISCO— Waived Jerone Davt- 
■OAfuBbodL aad RodMoore, wide receiver.. 

TAMPA BAY— Oaimed Scott Sfma,Uck- . 
er, oft miivera front nnr Enptaad. . 


into 3 4 t 13* 216 « 

Thursday's Game 
Edmonton 44. Sacramento 15 


CHICA G O w ai ved Plied* C— lii.sfty; 
Doran Alcorn klcxerpunler; Reggie Givens 
UnabocAer: Mika Hlgtimuer, runnlni-toack; 


HOCKEY . 

. National Hecker; Leagee ■ 
BOSTON— Signed ‘Evgeni RyabdiBew, 
gaatie, foZ-year contract. 


CLEMSON— Named Steve Nrtsan .asso- 
‘ date athletic director. 

. - OEPAUL-Named David Whetart women's 
leant* coach; Jell VtorisoHcraive tine coach; 
■ and Kevta Perkkn ortenslve tine coach. 

FLORIDA STATE— Aitnounced hie mid- 
nation of Kenny WlllWmsan, men's artistall 
badcelban coach, sa he can take the same 
position at Seten HoO. 

FURMA N N amed Aaron Stulls assistant 
baseball coach. 

HOLY CROSS-EIU BeOeroM, ttockev eooch, 
resigned. Named Paul Pearl, hockey coach. 

MAINE MARITIM E Named Mike Hodg- 
son toditwu CDocti and Scan Fty defensive 
coordinatgr. 

NORTHEAST LOUISIANA— Nomad Car- 
ton Ftmchess raesrs asstotani baskattMli 
coach. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



OKAY, UTTLE BROTHER, RUN 
OUT TO THE KITCHEN. ANP GET 
ME A GLASS OF WATER. 


WHY 1 
SH0ULP 
17 y 


TO KEEP FROM 
GETTING PDUNPED 
ON THE HEAP! , 


BROTHER HARASSMENT!/ 





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interhatiohal herald TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 20-21, 1994 


Page 17 






# * . 

* 


\ 


For Lendl Becomes 
Sound of Silence 


By RobinHnn 

ffew Ton fc Times Sanee 

NEW HAVEN, Connecticut 
— The strains of “Penny Lane,” 
Ivan LendFs chosen theme song 
at the failed musical experiment 
this Volvo International tennis 
event has become, won’t be 
heard again. 

Nostalgia isn’t one of the 34- 
y ear-old LeadTs strong suits — 
be selected the song out of ser- 
endipity rather than sentiment 
over his 12th and possibly last 
visit at the event. 

Bat he seemed genuinely re- 
al after No. 7-seeded Marc 
set’s unbreakable serve sent 
the Swiss player into the quar- 
terfinals and sent Lendl home 
to nearby Goshen for a week- 
end of golf. 

Lendl, a three-time U.S. 

. Open champion, said he wasn't 
certain whether he would play 
here, there or anywhere next 
year and dismissed as illogical 
the notion of his capturing a 
ninth career Grand Slam title at 
Flushing Meadows next month. 

“I don't have the level of con- 
fidence Pd like to have at this 
stage,” said LendL “I haven’t 
made plans for next year yeti I 
don’t know even if I want to 
play.” 

Lendl, whose ranking has 
dropped to 29th in the course of 
a two-year slide complicated by 
hand and back surgery, con- 
verted none of die six break 
points he earned against Ros- 
set's cannonball serve and de- 
parted the Volvo a 6-7 (6-&), 6- 
4, 6-4 third-round loser. 

“Even if you get a second 
serve, it’s still a big serve,** 


Lendl said of the ample axtfflery 
- - m 


mph (215 kph) delivery rates 
hnn second on the ATP Tour in 
that specialty.' 

Rossst now holds aX) edge 
in tbeir career rivalry and said, 
with Lesdtesqpm indifference, 
that he wasn’t sony about doling 
out disappcrntmenltothe player 
who once commanded the No. ] 
spotfor a' record 270 weeks. 

“Maybe three years ago when 
I beat him here, that was 
strange,” said Rosset, who was 
more concerned -tins afternoon 
with making sure . Lendl didn’t 
sneak back into centred of their 
2-hour, 26-mhmte match. “I 
was surprised becaosehe fought 
until the last point. I had a lot of 
Srst serves but he was returning 
unbelievable.” / 

LcndFs backhand volley, a 
shot he turned to in order to 
prevent Rosset from “pushing 
him around” fr om the back- 
coart, was likewise effective. 
The tournament’s top-seeded 
r, Michael Stich, put in a 
shift on the stadium 
court and emegged with a pair of 
victories that gave him a quarter- 
final-round assignation with 
Patrick Rafter of Australia. 

In a match that was halfway 
complete before being washed 
out by Wednesday night’s 
showers, Stich gave MarceQo 
Rios, last year’s top-ranked ju- 
nior, a 6-3, 7-5 dressing-down. 

And just before an early eve- 
ning drizzle settled in, Stich 
turned in an even more persua- 
sive performance against Dan- 
id Vacek far a 6-2, 6-2 victory 
that was briefly interrupted in 



Christie Wins — What’s the Issue? 


Michael Stich 
Daniel Vacek; Si 


ttktad Mei/Tbe Anodjaed Pick 

to his knees to avoid a shot from 
i won for Iris second victosy of the day. 


the second set when the toddler 
son of the doubles player Cyril 
Suk yanked a fire alarm in the 
players’ lounge. 

Stick later joined the lengthy 
list of players riding the coat- 
tails of tlie departed and dis- 
gusted Andre Agassi on what 
has become the real bone of 
contention in the fan-friendly 
innovations package the ATP 
Tour introduced here. 

“The game is not going to 
improve by playing music dur- 
ing the changeovers,” said 
Such, who uses the non-duJcet 


tones of Aerosmith’s “Crazy” 
for his intro music. 

While Agassi viewed the mu- 
sic as a hucksterish intrusion 
that further estranged fans 
from the players, the German’s 
chief complaint was that the 
tour didn't give its players the 
option of refusing the change- 
over serenades. 

“We're supposed to be repre- 
sented by the ATP, not just 
fools that can be kicked around 
by them,” said Stich, who like 
Agassi, asked that the music be 
silenced. “It’s going to hurt the 
game.” 


By Ian Thomsen 

Intmaamal Herald Tribute 

BRUSSELS — The sprinter 
Dennis Mitchell was permitted 
to go on earning his living here 
Friday at the expense of his 
Nigenan rival, who according 
to witnesses was kicked in the 
head by Mitchell while brawl- 
ing early Thursday monring 
with the American and Ms 
brother. 

Mitchell showed up for work 
here in a fluorescent outfit the 
color of a spotlight. He had lit- 
tle trouble finishing second in 
10.12 seconds to Linford Chris- 
tie, the winner of the Grand 
Prix Memorial Van Damme in 
10.03. 

It might have been tougher if 
not for the absence of Olapade 
Adezukeo, who had gone home 
to Austin. Texas, with two 
stitches over his eye and a mild 
concussion. On Wednesday 
night in Zurich, four hours be- 
fore suffering those injuries, he 
had beaten Mitchell to third 
place by one one-hundredth of 
a second in the season’s most 
crucial sprint. 

Mitchell, whose best time of 
9.94 is second only to Leroy 
Barren's wo rid record of 9.85 
this year, was declining to give 
his side of the story Friday on 
advice of his attorney, accord- 
ing to Coach John Smith. 

If two athletes can fight in 
front of 40 or SO colleagues in 
the official hotel lobby of the 
world’s largest Grand nix meet 
— and one goes on to race the 
next day against a weakened 
fidd without fear of punish- 
ment — then what’s to stop it 
from happening again? 

Christie was asked about 
Adeniken’s injuries and he said, 
“I'm glad it wasn’t me." 

It was the first brawl in mem- 
inYolving two world-class 
letic rivals. 


Adeniken’s agent, Mark 
Block, said that although he 
might have recovered enough to 
compete here, Adeniken had 
flown home in order to defuse 
the situation. “He’s been run- 
ning so well lately, we didn’t 
want to take any chances," 
Block said. 

Adeniken and Mitchell face 
able suspensions from the 
jtomationa] Athletics Federa- 
tion (1AAF) for brining the 
sport into disrepute. 

“I will investigate what hap- 
pened that evening," said San- 
dro Giovanefli, director of com- 
petitions for the IAAF, “but I 
consider it a persona! matter, a 
private matter, between the two 
individuals involved. In these 
cases it’s up to the meet orga- 
nizers to take action.” 

He will look into it, he was 
saying, but he couldn’t care less. 
The Brussels meet director. 
WHfried Meert, whose event 
was robbed of a 9.95-second 
sprinter because he had been 
beaten up by a rival dan. ad- 
mitted Thursday that he was 
powerless to take action against 
MitchdL 

“It has nothing to do with 
what people do in their private 
lives,” Giovandli said. ^Wbat 
concerns us is only what they do 
or fail to do in the stadiums.” 

According to several witness- 
es, the fight started after Mitch- 
ell approached Adeniken in the 
lobby of the Hotd Nova Park at 
2 AJVL Thursday to demand an 
apology. Adeniken asked. why, 
and Mitchell reminded him of 
their tiff a few days earlier at 
the airport in North Carolina, 
after Mitchell's 100-meters vic- 
tory over Adeniken at the Pan 
Africa-USA meet 

At the airport, the two sprint- 
ers allegedly had to be separat- 
ed after MitdreQ accused Aden- 
iken of speaking badly to 


Top Swimmers Start the Action at Commonwealth Games 


The Associated Press 

VICTORIA, British Colombia — 
With the biggest track stars still com- 
peting in Europe, some of the weald’s 
top swimmers will start the action at 
the XV Commonwealth Games. 

- Hay ley Lewis, who won five golds 
for Australia four years ago at Auck- 
land, New Zealand, aims to add two 
more to her collection on Friday in 
the 400- ureter ■mdrvrdnal'medley and 
the 800 Freestyle relay. 

Her countryman, Phil Rogers, the 
short course world record-holder, will 
go against the 200-meter champion, 
.Jon Cleveland of Canada, and Nick 
Gillingham of England in the 100 
breaststroke. 

Another Australian, Kierea Per- 
kins, who holds the world record at 
800 and 1,500 meters, goes in the 200- 
meter freestyle. 

Some 3,300 competitors from a re- 


cord 64 nations are at the 10-day 
Games, which feature 10 sports. 

The Sooth Africans have returned 
to the Games for the first time since 
1958. They were banned in 1961 be- 
cause of opposition to the govern- 
ment’s apartheid policies. 

They now have a new flag and, at 
Thursday’s opening ceremonies, He- 
zdfciel Sepeng. 2 blade. 800-meter run- 
ner, was the first to cany it at a major 
multisports event. The South Afri- 
cans got a long standing ovation from 
the 33,000 spectators in Centennial 
Stadium. 

ELana Meyer, a 10,000-meter run- 
ner who won a silver medal at the 
1992 Olympics, is South Africa’s big 
hope on the track, while a contender 
in the boxing ring is light flyweight 
Hawk Makepula, one of seven black 
competitors on the team 

le South Africa returns, anoth- 


er will say farewell to the Games. 
Hong Kong ceases to be a Common- 
wealth nation when it reverts to Chi- 
na a year before the next Games at 
Kuala Lumpur, in 1998. 

Although swimming events started 
Friday with finals of the women’s 
1 00-meter freestyle, men’s 100 breast- 
stroke, women's 400 individual med- 
ley and women’s 800 freestyle relay, 
the first medals went to cyclists in the 
men's team time trial. 

Badmin ton, boxing, gymnastics, 
lawn bowls, wrestling and shooting 
also began Friday. Track begins 
Monday and weightlifting on Tues- 
day. 

England has a powerful track team 
led by the world and Olympic cham- 
pions Linford Christie and Sally 
Gunnell, who still are competing at 
Europe meets. 

Christie’s main rivals in the 100 


meters will be Frankie Fredericks of 
Namibia, double Olympic silver med- 
alist and 200-meter titlist at the 1993 
World Championships, and Nigeria’s 
Olapade Adeniken, who finished 
third to Christie in Zurich on 
Wednesday. 

Gunnell, who also is world record- 
holder, should have no trouble de- 
fending her 400-ineier hurdles title. 
Her main rivals don't compete for 
Commonwealth nations. 

Colin Jackson, world champion 
and record-holder in the 110-meter 
hurdles, competes for Wales. His 
main rival will be England's Tony 
Jarrelt, runnerap to the Welshman at 
the world championships. 

In the absence of Jamaician star 
Merlene Ottey, the women’s sprint 
races appear wide open. 


In 1986. Canada produced a super- 
heavyweight fighter who went on to 
win at the Olympics, then became a 
pro. That was Lennox Lewis, current- 
ly World Boxing Council heavy- 
weight titlisL Shane Hinton is Cana- 
da’s super-heavyweight hope this 
time. 

The leading members of Australia's 
weightlifting team were born in Bul- 
garia or Romania and are former 
world or Olympic champions. All have 
obtained Australian citizenship and 
this is their first Commonwealth 
Games. The Romanian, Nicu Vlad, 
won an Olympic title 10 years ago. 
Bulgarians are Kiri] Kounev, Scvdalin 
Marrnov and Stefan Botev. Botev, who 
competes in the 108-kilogram catego- 
ry, served notice on his rivals that he is 
in form by lifting in training what 
would have been a world record if it 
had been in competition. 


NESTLINGS By Ted Fulton 


ACROSS 

I Pane hen 

{spiritual 

leader) 

5 Overload 

10 Fail to mention 

14 Short end of the 
stick 

18 Spirit 

19 Locked 
passageway 

20 Mr. Ague*’ 

21 Diminish 

22 Which came 
first, the 
chicken or the 
egg? 

24 Subject of 
1962’s Best 
Picture 

26 Lowered 

17 Bird hunter’s 
shelter 

29 Intensify 

30 generis 

3t Writer 

OTaolain et al. 

32 “Sony, I can’t 
come 1 ’ 

33 Spicy cuisine 

38 Experiences 


39 Grow 
accustomed 

40 Noted war 
story 

41 Pet rocks, once 

42 Extinct bird 

45 Warship of old 

46 Property may 
have these 

47 Lawn care 
product 

48 Curse 

4? Out of favor 

53 End of a fitting 
phrase 

55 Hash 

56 More cowlike? 

57 Convenient 

59 Provoked 

60 Persisted 

63 Castigates 

65 Overhead 

68 Some parties 

70 Crusades 
combatant 

74 Sir Freddie of 
Skytnm 

75 Kudzu,e.g. 

76 Zap 


\ 



78 Open slightly 

79 Third man 
81 Golfer Calvin 

83 Northernmost 
city of ancient 
Palestine 

84 Right to decide 

85 ——tectonics 

86 Record 

87 “Kiss an Angel 
Good Momin'" 
country singer 

89 Enjoys, with 
"in" 

90 Takes 'to heart 
92 —Springs, 

Cola. 

95 Histrion 

96 — — — o'-shantcr 

97 Click beetle 

98 Geometrical . 
solid 

99 Emulate 
Voltaire 

104 Gainsay 
106 Flabbergasted 

108 It needs to be 

- broken 

109 Polite refusal 
HO Some cheeses 

111 Miracle site 

112 Distantly 
IZ3 Flowering 

shrub 

114 Coup 

115 Scout’s 
handiwork 

DOWN 

1 Impart 

2 Ship’s direction 

3 Impair 

4 Kicks in, 
initially 

5 Suitable for a 
postcard 

6 Safe item 

7 It was riven by 
Sl Nicholas 

8 Staff, in a way 

9 Common 

10 Bids one club 

11 Temperate 

12 A Gershwin 

13 Allergy victim's 
fate 

14 Asseverates 

15 "La plume dc 
ma— — * 

16 Intact 

17 Page noises 
20 Absc am, for 

one 

23 Frequent 
■25 Groove for a 
sliding door 
28 Orbiting 
photographer 
31 Onrwhoectsa 
lift? 


1 

2 

3 

PI 

11 



□ 

22 




W 




r 

■ 

M 


X 

t 






© New York 1W E&ed by WW Storfc 


32 Clear of debris 

33 Antilles native 

34 "A Bell for 

W 

35 House supports 

36 Crude container 

37 Melange 

38 One response 
to s challenge 

41 Scrub 

42 Flash Gordon’s 
foe 

43 Previously 

44 Canceled 
48 Puzrietype 

50 Letter closing 

51 Nostalgic film 
of 1982 

52 Multivolume 
ref. 

54 Tommy 

Dorsey's “ 

is ft" 

55 Transport to 
ihcTuilcries 

57 Gulf of 

58 Make out 

61 Fixes firmly 

62 Baby Doc 
Duval irr, c.g. 


64 DcSotoor 
Hudson 

65 Sadly 

66 Californian's 
vacation spot, 
informally 

67 Approve 

69 Hunks better of 

71 Port NW of 
Gibraltar 

72 Get dear of 

73 Barcelona 
babies 

76 Foot pattern? 

77 Passage 

79 Losers 

80 Kasparov's 
birthplace 

-82 Holed up. in a 
way 

85 Dad 

87 Black Watch, 
for one 

88 Canyon’s edge 

89 Acrimonious 

90 More slippery 

91 Corroborate 

92 Hajj objective 


93 Cool 

94 Devi 

/second-hit 
peak in India) 

95 Football 

HaJI-of-Famer 

Hcrbcr 

98 Coin of 
Chihuahua 

99 Kind of team 


100 Heroine of 
Tennessee 
Williams's 
"Summer and 
Smoke" 

101 Mr. Lendl 

102 Paradoxical 
philosopher 

103 Pan of Q.E.D. 
105 TV knob abbr. 
107 Joroon wrote 

one to himself 


Sobitiou to Parade of Aug. 13-24 



International 

Classified 

Marketplace 

• Monday 

international Conferences and Semmars 

• Tuesday 
Education Directory 

• Wednesday 

Business Message Center 

• Thursday 

intern atio nal Recruitment 

• Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Hobdays and Travel 

• Saturday 

Arts and Antiques 

Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 
For further information, contact Philip Oma In Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 37 94 74 - Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 

Iteral b^^teSrib une 


On September 6th, the IHT will publish a 
Sponsored Section on 

The Shipping 
Industry 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ Poesfoteaiance among four of the 
world's largest shipping companies. 

■ An analysis of technological advances. 

■ Effects of GATT on the shipping industry. 

■ Focus on the luxury cruise market 

■ Financing -the development of off-shore 

shipping funds. 

:of this section wiB be distributed at the 
Machinery & Marina Technology Exhdilton 

and Conference in Hamburg 
from September 27-Qctober 1. 

For further information, please contact BBMehder 
n Pans at (33-1) 46 37 93 78, fax: (33-1)46 37 50 44. 


CVrERNATIUNAL 



Mitchell’s mother and girl- 
friend while in line at the check- 
in counter. Adeniken has de- 
nied criticizing them. 

Now, in the hotd lobby, 
Mitchell was arguing with the 
huger Adeniken, who is a mas- 
ter of karate. With Mitchell 
were his brother Tony and his 
masseuse. 

The eyewitness accounts are 
condensed to the following ver- 
sion: 

Adeniken turned his back to 
walk away, and Mitchell report- 
edly pushed him down. Several 
people jumped in to break up 
the fight, with Adeniken head- 
butting Tony Mitchell, opening 
a cut in Mitchell’s head. Even- 
tually the powerful American 
hurdler Roger Kingdom, acting 
as peacemaker, pinned Adeni- 
ken to the ground. 

A hotel security guard had 
subdued Mitchell’s masseuse 
with a choke hold when the 
American sprinter Jon Drum- 
mond, who trains with Mitch- 
ell, pulled the security guard 
away. It is possible that Drum- 
mond didn’t realize the man 
was a security guard. 

Then Mitchell broke free, ran 
around the pile of squirming 
bodies, and reportedly kicked 
Adeniken in the head. 

The rest was like a martial 
arts movie. Adeniken. woozy 
and bleeding down his face, was 
allowed to stand up. With three 
karate kicks he tome out Mitch- 
efl’s brother, the masseuse — 
who crashed against the wall 
with a kick to the chest — and 
Dennis Mitchell, who left the 
lobby bleeding from the nose or 
mouth. Adeniken was then tak- 
en to the hospital. 


Mitchell has been known for 
his short temper. He appeared 
to be reaching his peak tins 
summer — only to have the 
spotlight turned upon his fellow 
American when Burrell broke 
the world record six weeks ago 
in Lausanne. Burrell has told 
friends that the next time he 
raced against Mitchell in Lille, 
France, Mitchell tried to pick a 
fight with him. 

After Burrell bad won in 
Lille, Mitchell reportedly con- 
fronted him, saying, “This is 
not a boxing match.” He ac- 
cused Burrell of hitting him. 
Burrell denied it but Mitchell 
persisted, saying, “You hit me. 
bitch.” Burrell says he turned 
away, saying, “You aren’t any- 
thing,” or words to that effect 

Block was denying rumors 
Friday that Adeniken would 
seek legal action. 

The two sprinters had been 
brought together Thursday by 
the Zurich meet director and, in 
effect were made to shake 
hands like a couple of school- 
boys after a recess brawl. 

In the meantime, Adeniken's 
fellow Nigerian sprinters — 
Davidson Ezinwa and Daniel 
Effiong. both having run under 
10 seconds this year — were 
said to be seeking revenge 
against Mitchell. 

“Dennis had better watch his 
back,” one world-class sprinter 
said. “Contrary to appearances, 
there are a lot of little things 
that can be done to hurt some- 
one in the sprints — a little 
bumping, a little shove. Maybe 
it would happen in the World 
Championships or Olympics.” 

But then, it is only a personal 
matter. 


9 Bidders for Olympics 

The Associated Press 

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — The list of biddm for the 
2002 Winter Olympics was reduced to nine on Friday after 
the withdrawal of Alma-Ata, Kazakhstan. 

Alma-Ata, considered a long-shot at best, failed to submit 
official bidding documents to the International Olympic 
Committee by Friday’s deadline. 

The other candidates, including front-runner Salt Lake 
City, Utah, are Graz, Austria: Jaca, Spain; Ostersund, Swe- 
den; Poprad-Tatry, Slovakia; Quebec; Zion, Switzerland: 
Sochi, Russia; and Tarvisio. Italy. 

Representatives of the nine bidders will appear before the 
IOC executive board in Paris on Aug. 27. Between mid- 
September and mid-November, the IOC evaluation commis- 
sion will visit each site. 


AUGUST 22-27 

19 4 4 

THE LIBERATION OF PARIS 

Following the success of the 
Normandy landings in early June 1944, 

Allied troops continued fighting throughout 
the summer across the north of France, 
finally reaching the outskirts of Paris. 

In the last days of August, as the 
Allies approached the city, the unarmed 
population of Paris - reinforced by a small 
number of armed resistance fighters - rose 
against the occupying German forces. In 
four days of street battles and general 
insurrection, Paris was liberated. 

To commemorate these dramatic 
days, we will reproduce the six front pages 
from the New York Herald Tribune chronicl- 
ing the week of August 22 through 27. 

Events covered in that same 
extraordinary week include the liberation of 
Marseille, Grenoble, Le Havre and Rouen, 
plus an exclusive report following the 
liberation of Florence. You’ll follow the 
reports day-by-day from the Herald 
Tribune’s award-winning team of war 
correspondents. 

Don’t miss the International Herald 
Tribune’s special commemorative series 
starting Monday, August 22nd. 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 20-21, 1994 


DAVE BARRY 


Speaking of Syntax 


Euphoria and Dyspepsia About Home and Abroad 


Initmatiml Herald Tribune 


M IAMI — U’s lime now for 
Mister Language Persoa 


1VA Mister Language Persoa 
the expert who answers fre- 
quently asked questions about 
grammar and syntax despite 
having no idea what “syntax” 
means. Today’s first frequently 
asked question comes from 
Mick Philip of Raleigh. North 
Carolina who writes: 

“1 recently bought a micro- 
phone from the Shure Micro- 
phone Co. The brochure says 
that it is ’often called the unsur- 
passed choice of professional 
performers.' My question is, 
should I avoid deodorants that 
contain alcohol?" 


“OUie Ollie Olsen free.” “Ollie 
Ollie oxen free” and “Red 
Rover ” Ultimately, it will be up 
to the Supreme Court to decide. 

Q. Who is “Ollie”? 

A. He is the artist formerly 
known as “Wayne Newton." 

Q. I’m writing an operating 
manual for a nuclear power 
plant in a major urban area; I 
wish to know which is the cor- 
rect term: “Whoqps-a-daisy” or 
“Whoopsy-daisy. 

A. The Association of Associ- 


P ARIS —While thousands stream to beach- 
es with creams of exponentially increasing 
SPFs and volumes of Proust which, they swear, 
will finally be read this summer, others stay at 
home with a well-thumbed copy of Peter 
Yapp's “The Traveller's Dictionary of Quota- 
tion: Who Said What About Where?” 

At 1.002 pages it is nearly as long as Proust 
who is cited only once: “When I went to Ven- 


who is cited only once: “When I went to Ven- 


MARY BLUME 


ated Atomic Nuclear Plant Engi- 
neers recommends: “UH-oh." 


A. Well, you should probably 
DRINKING them. 


stop DKINKIN 
Q. Speaking of what things 
ore called, I have noticed that 
when media people refer to the 
rock musician who changed his 
name from “Prince" to an un- 


pronounceable symbol, they call 
him “the artist formerly known 


os Prince “ My question is. what 
do his friends call him in casual 


settings? Do they say, “Hey, the 
Artist Formerly Known as 


Artist Formerly Known as 
Prince, is there any more bean 
dip?" 

A. No. in casual settings they 
shorten it: “Hey. Twit.” 


Q. According to a transcript 
published in the Feb. 4, 1994, 
issue of the Newnan (Georgia) 
Times Herald (sent in by will 
Davis), what exchange took 
place between a police emer- 
gency operator and a roan 
named Bill Eidson, who called 
91 1 when his wife started hav- 
ing sharp abdominal pains? 

A. The exchange was as fol- 
lows: 

EIDSON: Uh. ma’am, there 
is something coming out! There 
is a baby coming out! 

OPERATOR: O. K-. she was 


pregnant 

Q. Has former Miami Dol- 
phin football player Joe Rose, 
who is now a sports-talk person 
on radio station WQAM in Mi- 
ami. made any good statements 
on the air? 

A. Yes. Speaking about Indi- 
anapolis Colts quarterback Jeff 
George. Joe said: “He’s the 
kind of guy who doesn’t like it 
when anything out of the ab- 
normal happens.” Also, refer- 
ring to baseball star Barry 
Bonds, Joe asked: “Does he 
think he walks on water differ- 
ently than anybody else?” 

□ 


Q. Please explain the gram- 
matical difference between 
“you’re” and “your." 

' A. Certainly. “You’re” is a 
perennial invective that is used 
in declamative sentences in- 
volving property damage. 

EXAMPLE: “You’re stupid 
dog ate our wading pool.” 

Whereas “your" is a dispa ra- 
tive injunction that is used in 
writing to cable TV companies. 

EXAMPLE: "Your going to 
fry in hell." 

Q. In a game of Hide and 
Seek, what phrase should the 
person who is “it” yell to let the 
other players know that they 
may safely return to home base? 

A. When he was little Mister 
Language Boy. Mister Language 
Person yeUed. "Ollie Ollie in 
come free.” However, various 
professional journalists who 
were asked about this claimed 


ice.” he wrote to Madame Strauss, “my dream 
became my address.” 

Other quotations, less upbeat are as balm to 
the stay-at-home. Champion in the dyspepsia 
stakes is probably Evelyn Waugh who slurs 
sites from Addis Ababa to York (“There are 
more harlots in York than I ever saw else- 
where"). although other famous writers are no 
slouches at casting aspersions. 

There is John Donne on the “spongie hy- 
droptique Dutch” and Mark Twain on the 
German language: “Whenever the literary Ger- 
man dives into a sentence, that is the last you 
are going to see of him till he emerges on the 
other side of the Atlantic with his verb in his 
mouth.” As for the Atlantic itself, there is of 
course Oscar Wilde’s one-word summary: 
“Disappointing.” 

Why do the wrong people travel, asked Noel 
Coward. Why does anyone travel. London's 
Sunday Express in effect asked at the start of 
the August vacations in a story headlined 
"Wish You Weren’t Here?” 

Uncharacteristically unmindful of its travel 
industry advertisers, the tabloid listed "holiday 
hotspots where British tourists risk more than 
just sunburn.” Ten tourists murdered in Flori- 
da in 12 months: in Greece the number of 
British women assaulted has doubled in a year; 



whole universe" (Horace Walpole). “Kyoto is 
as good as Glasgow for excursions, wrote 
Douglas Sladen in “Queer Things About Ja- 
pan” (1903). 

Ini fairness, the British are as hard on Home 
as'ihey are on Abroad. Alexander Pope has 


as Paris. Rome and Vienna) Dennis Potter 


poignantly described Heathrow: “I did not 
fully understand the dread term Terminal ill- 
ness’ until l saw Heathrow for myself-" Horace 
Walpoielound Oxforti a “nursery of nonsense 
and bigotry" but James Joyce said it is where 
they makethc best shirts. Mild Utile Newhaven 
is. says Virginia Woolf, “spot and rash and 
pimple and blister." 

Travel means a search for the impossible. 
W. H. Auden, for example, stud, “I don’t like 
sunshine. I would like a Mediterranean life in 
a northern dimate.” Lord Kitchener dis- 
missal rite Egyptians on the reasonable 
grounds that "I can’t think much of a people 
who drew cats the -same for. four thousand 


years." but Ronald Firbank suggested a more 
tem Derate view in his novel. "The Eccentrici- 


temperate view in his novel, 
ties of Cardinal Pirelli:” 


" T have never travelled.’ Dona Consolation 
blandly confessed, ‘but I dare say. dear, that 
you can't -judge Egypt by Aida.' " 

Some at die quotations are just plain funny. 
Fred Allen on Boston in a letter to Groucho 
Marx; “1 have just returned from Boston. It is 


the only thing to do. if you find yourself up 
there." Bette Midler "When it’s three o’clock 


in Egypt gun and bomb attacks “have devastat- 
ed the holiday industry.” 


that they ydled. among other 
things. "Ollie Ollie outs in free.” Knight- Ridder Newspapers 


WRITING TIP FOR 
NEWSPAPER REPORTERS: 
To ensure total objectivity, al- 
ways be sure to present “both 
sides of the story.” 

WRONG: “OJ. definitely 
did iL” 

RIGHT: “OJ. definitely did 
it, but we presume he is inno- 
cent” 


ed the holiday industry.” 

In Turkey, the Kurdistan Workers Party is 
on the move. In Kenya, avoid the northeastern, 
eastern and coast provinces and do not roam 
Nairobi alone at night. In Russia, "muggings, 
theft and pickpocketing are increasing in all 
major cities ” In France, "there are warnings of 
armed gangs ambushing motorists." For heav- 
en's sake, put down that holiday brochure and 
pick up Peter Yapp. 

There are more than 10.000 quotations in his 
book, which ranges from the 15th century to 
the 1970s in time, from Aachen to Zurich 
alphabetically and includes such spots as the 
sun and moon and Kunduz in Afghanistan, 
about which in 1937 Robert Byron quoted an 
ancient proverb: "A visit to Kunduz is tanta- 
mount to suicide.” 

Byron is one of the noted travel writers cited, 
along with Patrick Leigh Fermor. Paul Ther- 
oux. Jan Morris and Norman Lewis who says 


that one of the striking features of Belize "is the 
mysterious absence of anything that might 
come under the heading of having a good 
time.” 


As expected, there is Graham Greene on 
Liberia. D. H. Lawrence on Mexico. Karen 
Blixen on the Ngong Hills; from Athens. 
Greece, to Athens. Georgia, no part of the 
globe is neglected. Many of the comments are 
lyric but the observations of the footsore and 
overheated are more comforting, as are those of 
the merely disappointed. The chapter in Nils 
Hone bow’s “The Natural History of Iceland" 
called "Concerning the Owl” has only one line: 
"There are no owls of any kind on the whole 
island.” 


Emily Dickinson may never have seen a fiord 
but still she wrote. "November always seemed 
to me the Norway of the year.” Edward Marsh 
thought majestic Kilimanjaro resembled "a 
vast celestial mould of Christinas pudding 
streaked with frozen rivers of brandy butter.” 


To Atdous Huxley, Florence "is the home of 
those who cultivate with an equal ardour mah- 
jongg and a passion for Fra Angelico.” while 
Ruskin of course admired Venice but said that 
"Sl Peter's is fit for nothing but a ballroom and 
it is a little too gaudy even for that” and 
thought Siena’s cathedral even worse: “over- 
cul over-striped, over-crockeied, over-gabled, 
a piece of costly confectionary, and faithless 
vanity.” 

Most of the quotations come from British 
writers and may betray the native suspicion of 
Abroad. Henry James is more tender to Flor- 
ence — "everything about Florence seems to be 
colored with a mild violet, like diluted wine" — 
and is more sympathetic to a common travel- 
er’s plaint: “All southern countries look a little 
false under the ground glass of Incipient bad 
weather.” 


Some of the travelers' descriptions are aston? 
ishing: “Melbourne is very Parisian” (Lord 
Nortncliffe). "Paris is the ugliest town in the 


in New York, it’s still 1938 in London ” P. G. 
Wodehouse in his 1948 novel. "Uncle Dyna- 
mite:” 

“My dear wife is taking a trip to the West 
Indies. 

: “Jamaica?" 

"No. die went of her own volition.” 

Some observations are prescient, as Waller 
Lippmann's shortly before he died in 1974 
when asked what he thought the worst catastro- 
phe that could befall the world: "China, on the 
loose.” he" replied. “It is the destiny of the 
people of Haiti to suffer.” Papa Doc Duvalier 
complacently predicted. 

Others are way off base. Rudyard Kipling 
said, “The Japanese should have no concern 
with business.” Cedi Rhodes said of what is 
now Zimbabwe, “They can't take it away from 
me. can they? You never heard of a country's 
name being changed.” In 1940, Rwanda was 
described as “that African Switzerland.” 

The book’s last quotation is about paradise. 
Theone just before, by S. J. Per Cl man, is even 
more pleasing;: •' 

“I suggested she make a trip around the 
world. ‘Oh. 1 know,’ returned the lady, yawning 
with ennui, ‘but there’s so many other places I 
want to see first.’" 


WEATHER 


PEOPLE 


Europe 


Forecast for Sunday through Tuesday, as provided by Accu-Wealher. 


Today 

A Low W 


Hgb Iw W 

OF CJF 

AJgwa 20 IB 4 IBM ■ 

Aimtoidun 21/70 16*1 pc 

Ankara 29/84 12153 ■ 

Athens H «1 22/71 i 

Barcelona 31/88 23/73 pc 

Btfgmfa 28*2 16*1 pc 

Borin 21/70 11/52 c 

B naseta 24775 1 J /57 pc 

Biotope* 2 vn 13m c 

Copcnhagai 2 DJB 8 12*3 c 

Costa Dei So) 32*8 23/73 pc 

DiMi 16/01 sh 

EMuyh ISAS 12/53 rfi 

Rorance 32*9 19*8 ■ 

FmnWiat 21/70 11/52 c 

Goat 28*2 17*2 ■ 

HctaHd 18*4 11*2 i 

hxuftul 30*9 19*9 • 

LaaPskran 26/79 21/70 * 
Lisbon 27*3 17*2 ■ 

London 20*8 13*5 pc 

IlkM 37*6 19*8 pc 

Mfen 31*8 19*9 ■ 

Moscow 19*6 13*5 I 

Mudch 20/73 13*5 pc 

ttea 28*4 19*8 s 

Oslo 18/69 13*5 sh 

Pakno 31*8 24/75 pc 

Paris 27*0 17*2 » 

PogiM 22/71 10*0 C 

Roybal* 12*3 11*2 > 

Bums 30 *9 21/70 s 

St. Nantong 19*8 11/52 * 1 * 

StockMkn 18*4 12*3 pc 

SWSouy 28/79 14*7 p: 

Tefcm 18*4 11*2 • 

Vanin 29/84 21/70 » 

VhHvm 22/71 13*5 pc 

Wana* 19*8 11*2 1 

Ziafcri 27*0 18*1 « 


StnAwy 

Tefcm 

Vanin 


Tamaras 
Mgh Law W 
OF OF 
27*0 20*8 pc 
21/70 15*9 pc 
31*8 14*7 pc 
34*3 23/73 a 
31*6 23/73 9 
31*6 19*6 a 
23/73 1102 pc 
24/75 13*5 pc 
26*2 17*2 a 
20*8 10*0 pc 
31*8 24/75 a 
18*4 10*0 pe 
16*1 12/53 pc 
33*1 20*8 • 

am 12*3 pc 

29*4 17*2 4 
19*8 12*3 pc 
31*0 19*6 9 
27*0 22/71 1 
20/76 18*4 pc 
21/70 12*3 pc 
34*3 19*6 » 
32*9 21/70 * 
22/71 13*6 sK 
27*0 14*7 9 
30*6 21/70 * 
20*6 10*0 ah 
31*6 25/77 * 
27*0 14*7 pc 
26/79 13*5 9 
14*7 8 <46 pc 
33*1 21/70 a 
21/70 11*2 ah 
19*6 1««2 sh 
29*4 14*7 a 
19*6 13*5 pe 
31/88 22/71 a 
S /77 18*1 a 
23/73 1 1*2 pc 
29*4 18*1 ■ 



Today 

Wgb Low 
OF OF 


Beijng 

HngKano 


32*6 24/75 
32/89 24/75 
32/86 27*0 
29*4 24/76 
32*9 26 *2 
33*1 26/79 
32*6 24/75 
32*9 23/73 
32*6 26/79 
2 B/B 22/71 




lUraaasnraMy 
I Co* 


Itaaaatnbly 

Hoi 


North America 

High host will bate Ihe 
Rocky Mountain stales and 
western High Plains Into 
early next week. Thunder- 
storms will erupt over Ihe 
Eastern U.S. by Sunday, 
then dry and pleasant weaitv 
er will settle into the North- 
east by Tuesday. The South- 
eastern states will be quite 


Europe 

London through Parts writ be 
dr/ and pteasam Sunday. A 
lew showers are possible 
early ne* week. Very hot 
weather will continue into 
early next week from sotflh- 
easiem Spam through Italy 
lo western Turkey. Damp, 
cool weather wil be centered 
over Moscow early next 
week. 


Asia 

Typhoon Fred will bring 
heavy rams and gusty winds 
into east-central China Sun- 
day. Heavy rains wii (lowly 
push westward inlo central 
China early next week as 
Fred dissipates. Bei]lng 
through Seoul will be very 
wann Sunday into Tuesday. 
Tokyo wS be warm, but the 
extreme heat has ended 


Moon 
Cop* Toon 


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Eurowoodsiock got off lo a 
wei start but that didn’t stop 
fans. “We’re not going to go 
home just because of a little 
rain.” said a teenager who gave 
her name as Szflvi the Meatball 
as she and three friends shiv- 
ered in the rain at Hungary’s 
Woodstock reunion festival in * 
Budapest. Several of the origi- 
nal Woodstock performers, in- 
cluding Jetteo TuH Alvin Lee 
and the Jefferson Starship, are 
lo perform. 

□ 

Prince Charles and Princess 
Diana will battle it out in the WARM 
bookstores in November, with Gmtqn 
fresh accounts from opposite 
sides of their fractured marriage. London 
tabloid papers reported Friday that Diana 
is the subject of a new book by Andrew 
Morton, author of a previous one that gave 
her side of the story. Michael O’ Mara 
Books said it will publish "Diana: Her 
New Life” on Nov. 8, just five days after 
publication of Jonathan Dimbteby’s biog- 
raphy. “The Prince of Wales.” Dimbleby. 
it will be remembered, got Charles to ad- 



WARMUP — Rocker Roger Ctinton, brother of BiB 
Clinton, rehearsing for a two-night stand in Washington. 


mil that he had not always been faithful to 
Diana. . . . Prince PbiUp will become the 
first member of the British royal family to 
visit Israel when he accepts the Righteous 
Gentile award for his mother. Princess 
Alice of Greece. 

□ 

Sydney theater audiences may be wait- 


ing a long time for an ail-female produc- 
tion of Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Go- Tuesday. 


dot" to start. The Sydney 
Wayside Theatre’s production 
of the {Hay was abandoned af- 
ter English representatives of . 
Beckett’s estate, following his /• 
wishes, revoked its production 
rights to protest women play- 
ing the characters. 

Q 

Singer Bobby Brown is facing 
foreclosure on his Atlanta man- 
- sion for the second time. Brown 
. is uuarreaxs on an $850,000 
mortgage he took out to halt a 
foredosure lasl summer. There 
R.w.9. is also a second mortgage, origi- 
of .BiB . nally for $950,000, and the IRS 
ngtoa. has two tax liens against the 
property totaling more than 
$ 1 3 million. Maybe his wife, pop star Whit- 
ney Houston, wfl] help out. 

■ □ 

BBty Joel isn’t flattered that people are 
paying $200 for front-row seats to see him. 

So he’s arranged for some $75 seats up front 
to be given free to fans who were in the 
“nose-bleed” sections far from the stage. He 

..rokL nj V-I ■ r* - ^ a - 


‘Oh. 




plays with Elton John in San Antonio on 
Tuesday. 


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ABET Access Numbers 
How to can around the world 

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COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


Anstralla 
China, PRO— 

Guam 
Hong Kong 
India* 


ASIA Italy* 

1 - 800 - 881-011 UrchterMtehT 

10811 IUhnaate* 

018-872 Luxembourg 


172*1011 Brazil 
155-00-11 C Me 

8*196 Columbia 
0-800-0111 Costa Rica** 


800-1111 M acedo n ia, F.YJL of 9»80O4288 " Ecuador*- 


000-117 Mato* ■■ 
001-801-10 Monaco* 


Japan’ 

Korea 

Korea** 
Mahyahr 
New Zealand 
Philipp ine s*' 


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Sri Lanka 

Taiwan* 

Thailand* 


EUROPE 


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Armenia?* 

A us t ria *** 

npl gfu w i * 

Bulgaria 

Croatia** 

QeefeRep 

Denmark* 

Wntotofr 

France 

/^i-niany 

Greece” 


Iceland”* ' 
Ireland 


0039-111 Netherlands* 
009-11 Norway 

IT Poland***” 

800-0012 . Portugal” 

000-91 1 Romania 

105-11 RrgajgTMosccrcV) 

235-2872 Slovakia 
800-0111-111 . Spain* 

430-60 Sweden* 

0060-10288-0 Sw i tzerla n d* 

0019-991-1111 UJL 

E Ukraine* 

8*14111 jfflDDL 

jggggSgll Bahrain 

0800-100-10 Cyprus” 

00 - 1800-0010 farad 
99-380011 Kuwait 

0042000101 Lebanon (Beirut) 
8001-0010 Qatar 
9800-100-10 Saudi Arabia 
lg*jWll- Turkey* 

0130-0010 UAL” 

00-800-1311 AMEH 

WkjDMgm ' Argggjra* 

999-001 Belize* 
1-800-550000 Baftvta* 


900-99-00-11 Uruguay 

020-79 5-611 Venezuela 

155-00-11 

0500-89 3)011 Bahama* 

8*100-11 Bermuda* 

LEEAST British V.I. 


Brazil 000-8010 

Qtflc QQa-0312 

Columbia 980-11-0010 

Costa Rtca*a ~ fl 4 

Etuado* 17 : Jig 

0800*890-110 HSaftadof - 190 

19*-0011 Guatemala* jjO 

06-022 -9111 Guyana*** ' jgj 

800-190-u Honduras** . 12 3 

0*010480-0111 Mexico*** 95-800462 -4240 

05017*1-288 ' Nicaragua (Managua) 

01-800 4288 Panamas ‘ 

135-5042 - Peru* ioT 

00*420-0 0101 Suriname 

UfU S u »y 00-0410 

80-011-120 

CARIBBEAN 

Bahamas l-80O872-7flgi 




imuusEAST British vx 

- 800-001 Cayman Islands 

080-90010 Grenada* 

177-100 -2727 f£5F 

800-28 8 lama try* * 

fciraO 42 £801 .Vcth. Antfl 

- 0800-011-7 7 " St HnVNevis 

1-800 -10 : jj 

- - - °0~800-12277 Eppt”CC«lr^ 

800-12 1 . Gabon* 

AMERICAS farokk. 

001-800-200-111 1 Kenya* 

555 Liberia 

; 0*800-1112 Sooth Africa - 


1-800-872-2881 
1-800-672-2881 
l-800-g72-288T 
1-800-872-2881 
001-800972-2883 
0-800-872-2881 
001-800-872-2881 
~ 1-800-872-2881 


AFRICA 

(C«lro) 


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S1Q-0200 
0Q*-001 
■ 00111 
0800-10 
797*797 
0-800-99-0123 


AT&T 


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0 1994 AST 


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